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Recipe: Giblet gravy used to grace many Thanksgiving tables (just ask your grandmother) and it’s coming back

Giblet Gravy
Giblet GravyKaroline Boehm Goodnick for The Boston Globe

Makes 3 to 4 cups or enough to serve 8

Giblet gravy used to grace many Thanksgiving tables (just ask your grandmother), but fell out of favor. It's coming back, mostly because nose-to-tail eating eliminates food waste and gives your food serious flavor. So don't toss that bag of giblets tucked inside your turkey (some in the vent end and often more in the neck end). It's OK if you don't have the exact giblets for this gravy; simply use what you have. If your bird doesn't contain a liver or you're worried about its strong taste, omitting it is perfectly fine. While the gravy must be completed after the turkey comes out of the oven, save yourself hassle on Thanksgiving Day by making the stock in advance. When the bird is done and resting, mix the stock with the turkey pan drippings, thicken them with a flour and butter roux, and stir in the finely chopped giblets, lemon juice, and fresh sage.

STOCK

2tablespoons canola oil
1 each turkey neck, heart, and gizzard
1 onion, coarsely chopped
1 carrot, coarsely chopped
1 rib celery, coarsely chopped
6cups water
2teaspoons salt

1. In a stockpot over high heat, heat the oil. Add the turkey neck, heart, and gizzard. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring once, or until they are browned. Add the onion, carrot, and celery. Cook, stirring often, for 5 minutes, or until they are browned and beginning to soften.

2. Add the water and salt. Bring the liquid to a boil, lower the heat, and simmer, uncovered, for 60 to 90 minutes or until the neck meat pulls away easily from the bone.

3. Set a strainer over a bowl. Strain the stock, pressing firmly on the vegetables to get out all of the liquid. Remove the giblets from the strainer; reserve them with the stock. Discard the vegetables. If there are less than 4 cups of stock, add enough water to make 4 cups.

4. When the giblets are cool enough to handle, remove the meat from the neck bones. Finely chop the neck meat, gizzard, and heart. Refrigerate the giblets and stock separately.

GRAVY

Turkey roasting pan with juices
½cup white wine
1cup water
1 turkey liver
Salt and pepper, to taste
4tablespoons butter
6tablespoons flour
1tablespoon cornstarch mixed with 1 tablespoon cold water (optional)
2tablespoons chopped fresh sage
Juice of 1/2 lemon

1. When the turkey is done, transfer it to a cutting board or platter; cover loosely with foil and set the turkey in a warm place to rest. Pour the pan juices into a container or bowl. Let them sit for a minute to let the fat separate from the juices; the fat will float to the top. Skim off the fat. Return the juices to the roasting pan, and set it over 2 burners, if possible. Heat the roasting pan over medium heat.

2. Add the wine and water to the pan, and scrape the bottom to dislodge any sediment. Cook, stirring, until the mixture comes to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Turn off the heat.

3. Season the turkey liver with salt and pepper. In a saucepan over medium-high heat, melt the butter. When the butter is frothy, add the liver. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes on a side, or until brown. Transfer the liver to a cutting board; chop finely.

4. Add the flour to the saucepan and stir well. Cook, stirring often, for 3 to 5 minutes or until the mixture is golden and bubbly. Pour in the stock and the juices from the roasting pan. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Lower the heat and simmer the gravy for 10 to 15 minutes, or until it has thickened and reduced to just under 4 cups. If you prefer a thicker gravy, stir in the cornstarch mixture and whisk well. Return the liquid to a boil to activate the cornstarch. Lower the heat.

5. Add the neck meat, gizzard, heart, and liver to the pan. Simmer for 2 minutes, or until the giblets are warmed through. Add the sage and lemon juice. Taste for seasoning, and add more salt and pepper, if you like. Keep warm until serving.

Karoline Boehm Goodnick

Makes 3 to 4 cups or enough to serve 8

Giblet gravy used to grace many Thanksgiving tables (just ask your grandmother), but fell out of favor. It's coming back, mostly because nose-to-tail eating eliminates food waste and gives your food serious flavor. So don't toss that bag of giblets tucked inside your turkey (some in the vent end and often more in the neck end). It's OK if you don't have the exact giblets for this gravy; simply use what you have. If your bird doesn't contain a liver or you're worried about its strong taste, omitting it is perfectly fine. While the gravy must be completed after the turkey comes out of the oven, save yourself hassle on Thanksgiving Day by making the stock in advance. When the bird is done and resting, mix the stock with the turkey pan drippings, thicken them with a flour and butter roux, and stir in the finely chopped giblets, lemon juice, and fresh sage.

STOCK

2tablespoons canola oil
1 each turkey neck, heart, and gizzard
1 onion, coarsely chopped
1 carrot, coarsely chopped
1 rib celery, coarsely chopped
6cups water
2teaspoons salt

1. In a stockpot over high heat, heat the oil. Add the turkey neck, heart, and gizzard. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring once, or until they are browned. Add the onion, carrot, and celery. Cook, stirring often, for 5 minutes, or until they are browned and beginning to soften.

2. Add the water and salt. Bring the liquid to a boil, lower the heat, and simmer, uncovered, for 60 to 90 minutes or until the neck meat pulls away easily from the bone.

3. Set a strainer over a bowl. Strain the stock, pressing firmly on the vegetables to get out all of the liquid. Remove the giblets from the strainer; reserve them with the stock. Discard the vegetables. If there are less than 4 cups of stock, add enough water to make 4 cups.

4. When the giblets are cool enough to handle, remove the meat from the neck bones. Finely chop the neck meat, gizzard, and heart. Refrigerate the giblets and stock separately.

GRAVY

Turkey roasting pan with juices
½cup white wine
1cup water
1 turkey liver
Salt and pepper, to taste
4tablespoons butter
6tablespoons flour
1tablespoon cornstarch mixed with 1 tablespoon cold water (optional)
2tablespoons chopped fresh sage
Juice of 1/2 lemon

1. When the turkey is done, transfer it to a cutting board or platter; cover loosely with foil and set the turkey in a warm place to rest. Pour the pan juices into a container or bowl. Let them sit for a minute to let the fat separate from the juices; the fat will float to the top. Skim off the fat. Return the juices to the roasting pan, and set it over 2 burners, if possible. Heat the roasting pan over medium heat.

2. Add the wine and water to the pan, and scrape the bottom to dislodge any sediment. Cook, stirring, until the mixture comes to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Turn off the heat.

3. Season the turkey liver with salt and pepper. In a saucepan over medium-high heat, melt the butter. When the butter is frothy, add the liver. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes on a side, or until brown. Transfer the liver to a cutting board; chop finely.

4. Add the flour to the saucepan and stir well. Cook, stirring often, for 3 to 5 minutes or until the mixture is golden and bubbly. Pour in the stock and the juices from the roasting pan. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Lower the heat and simmer the gravy for 10 to 15 minutes, or until it has thickened and reduced to just under 4 cups. If you prefer a thicker gravy, stir in the cornstarch mixture and whisk well. Return the liquid to a boil to activate the cornstarch. Lower the heat.

5. Add the neck meat, gizzard, heart, and liver to the pan. Simmer for 2 minutes, or until the giblets are warmed through. Add the sage and lemon juice. Taste for seasoning, and add more salt and pepper, if you like. Keep warm until serving.Karoline Boehm Goodnick