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PASSOVER RECIPE

Recipe: This flourless almond Passover cake is adaptable to what you have on hand

Flourless Almond Cake
Flourless Almond CakeKaroline Boehm Goodnick for The Boston Globe

Makes one 9-inch cake

Passover may not look the same this year as it has in years past -- families will have to gather around the Seder table virtually and menus may be missing some traditional favorites -- but cooks will scour their own cabinets and supermarket websites to find a few ingredients to make things feel as normal as possible. This flourless cake is very adaptable to what you have on hand. If you have almond flour (pure ground almonds) in the cupboard, use it here and skip the process of grinding almonds. Add it to the recipe when the almonds go in with the full amount of sugar called for. You can use skinned or blanched almonds or a combination; cobble together what you have as long as it equals 2 1/2 cups. And if you can't find sliced almonds for the garnish, skip them. To flavor the cake, use orange or lemon rind; add the spices or leave them out. The fat here is olive oil, but canola is fine, too. The only rule to cooking during isolation is that exceptions are the rule. Next year's dessert can be a masterpiece; this year's will be homey and delicious.

Vegetable oil (for the pan)
cups slivered or whole blanched or unblanced (raw) almonds
¾cup sugar
3 eggs, separated
cup olive oil
Grated rind of 1 orange
¼teaspoon ground cinnamon
Pinch of ground nutmeg
½teaspoon salt
cup sliced almonds (for garnish)

1. Set the oven at 350 degrees. Oil a 9-inch cake pan, line the bottom with a round of parchment paper cut to fit it, and oil the paper.

2. In a food processor, pulse the almonds with 1/4 cup of the sugar until it resembles a very fine meal or flour; do not over process.

3. In a large bowl, whisk the egg yolks, olive oil, and orange rind to blend them. With a rubber spatula, stir in the ground almonds (or almond flour, if using), cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt.

4. In an electric mixer with a whisk attachment, beat the egg whites on medium speed. When they are frothy, slowly beat in the remaining 1/2 cup sugar. When all of the sugar has been added, and the whites form stiff peaks, remove the bowl from the mixer stand.

5. Add a large spoonful of egg whites to the almond batter and stir to lighten it. Working in batches, gently fold the almond mixture into the egg whites, taking care not to deflate the whites too much.

6. Transfer the batter to the cake pan and smooth the top. Sprinkle with sliced almonds. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes, or until the cake is golden brown and the center is set.

7. Set the cake on a metal rack and leave to cool for 10 minutes. Gently run a small metal spatula around the edge of the cake to loosen it from the sides of the pan. Carefully invert the cake onto a flat plate or board. Remove and discard the parchment paper. Set a serving platter upside down on the cake and invert them together so the cake is sitting right side up on the platter. Leave to cool completely.

Karoline Boehm Goodnick

Makes one 9-inch cake

Passover may not look the same this year as it has in years past -- families will have to gather around the Seder table virtually and menus may be missing some traditional favorites -- but cooks will scour their own cabinets and supermarket websites to find a few ingredients to make things feel as normal as possible. This flourless cake is very adaptable to what you have on hand. If you have almond flour (pure ground almonds) in the cupboard, use it here and skip the process of grinding almonds. Add it to the recipe when the almonds go in with the full amount of sugar called for. You can use skinned or blanched almonds or a combination; cobble together what you have as long as it equals 2 1/2 cups. And if you can't find sliced almonds for the garnish, skip them. To flavor the cake, use orange or lemon rind; add the spices or leave them out. The fat here is olive oil, but canola is fine, too. The only rule to cooking during isolation is that exceptions are the rule. Next year's dessert can be a masterpiece; this year's will be homey and delicious.

Vegetable oil (for the pan)
cups slivered or whole blanched or unblanced (raw) almonds
¾cup sugar
3 eggs, separated
cup olive oil
Grated rind of 1 orange
¼teaspoon ground cinnamon
Pinch of ground nutmeg
½teaspoon salt
cup sliced almonds (for garnish)

1. Set the oven at 350 degrees. Oil a 9-inch cake pan, line the bottom with a round of parchment paper cut to fit it, and oil the paper.

2. In a food processor, pulse the almonds with 1/4 cup of the sugar until it resembles a very fine meal or flour; do not over process.

3. In a large bowl, whisk the egg yolks, olive oil, and orange rind to blend them. With a rubber spatula, stir in the ground almonds (or almond flour, if using), cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt.

4. In an electric mixer with a whisk attachment, beat the egg whites on medium speed. When they are frothy, slowly beat in the remaining 1/2 cup sugar. When all of the sugar has been added, and the whites form stiff peaks, remove the bowl from the mixer stand.

5. Add a large spoonful of egg whites to the almond batter and stir to lighten it. Working in batches, gently fold the almond mixture into the egg whites, taking care not to deflate the whites too much.

6. Transfer the batter to the cake pan and smooth the top. Sprinkle with sliced almonds. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes, or until the cake is golden brown and the center is set.

7. Set the cake on a metal rack and leave to cool for 10 minutes. Gently run a small metal spatula around the edge of the cake to loosen it from the sides of the pan. Carefully invert the cake onto a flat plate or board. Remove and discard the parchment paper. Set a serving platter upside down on the cake and invert them together so the cake is sitting right side up on the platter. Leave to cool completely.Karoline Boehm Goodnick