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CHEFS AT HOME

Recipe: Beijing Bolognese at the Dumpling Daughter restaurants is a highly seasoned ground pork sauce

Dumpling Daughter's Beijing Bolognese
Dumpling Daughter's Beijing BologneseJoanne Rathe/Globe Staff

Serves 6

The Chinese version of Bolognese, called Zhajiangmian in Mandarin, explains Dumpling Daughter owner Nadia Liu Spellman, is a ground pork meat sauce. This home version is made with a lot of onion, a jar of hoisin sauce, and tofu; spoon it over spaghetti with a garnish of cucumber matchsticks, scallions, or bean sprouts. During the coronavirus, the Dumpling Daughter Weston location, which offers curbside pick-up, is selling the sauce by the pint. At home, Spellman lets her 3-year-old son, Julian, pick out the pasta he likes (often rotelle, the wheel shape).

cup canola or vegetable oil, or more if needed
1 Spanish or other large onion, finely chopped
1pound ground pork
1jar (8 or 9 ounces) hoisin sauce
2tablespoons bean paste (optional)
1package (14 ounces) firm tofu, drained and cut into small dice
Cucumber matchsticks, sliced scallions, or fresh bean sprouts (for garnish)

1. In a large skillet over medium heat, add the 1/3 cup oil with enough additional oil to make a thin layer in the pan. When it is hot, add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8 minutes, or until softened.

2. Add the pork, turn up the heat, and use a metal spoon to break up the meat. When the pork is crumbly, add the hoisin sauce and bean paste, if using. Turn the heat to medium-low and cook, stirring often, for 10 minutes.

3. Add the tofu and cook, stirring often, for 5 minutes, or until the tofu is broken up. Ladle over spaghetti or another pasta shape, and garnish with cucumber, scallions, or bean sprouts.

Adapted from Dumpling Daughter

Serves 6

The Chinese version of Bolognese, called Zhajiangmian in Mandarin, explains Dumpling Daughter owner Nadia Liu Spellman, is a ground pork meat sauce. This home version is made with a lot of onion, a jar of hoisin sauce, and tofu; spoon it over spaghetti with a garnish of cucumber matchsticks, scallions, or bean sprouts. During the coronavirus, the Dumpling Daughter Weston location, which offers curbside pick-up, is selling the sauce by the pint. At home, Spellman lets her 3-year-old son, Julian, pick out the pasta he likes (often rotelle, the wheel shape).

cup canola or vegetable oil, or more if needed
1 Spanish or other large onion, finely chopped
1pound ground pork
1jar (8 or 9 ounces) hoisin sauce
2tablespoons bean paste (optional)
1package (14 ounces) firm tofu, drained and cut into small dice
Cucumber matchsticks, sliced scallions, or fresh bean sprouts (for garnish)

1. In a large skillet over medium heat, add the 1/3 cup oil with enough additional oil to make a thin layer in the pan. When it is hot, add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8 minutes, or until softened.

2. Add the pork, turn up the heat, and use a metal spoon to break up the meat. When the pork is crumbly, add the hoisin sauce and bean paste, if using. Turn the heat to medium-low and cook, stirring often, for 10 minutes.

3. Add the tofu and cook, stirring often, for 5 minutes, or until the tofu is broken up. Ladle over spaghetti or another pasta shape, and garnish with cucumber, scallions, or bean sprouts.Adapted from Dumpling Daughter