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LETTERS

The Democratic primary: and then there was one

Democratic presidential candidates Senator Bernie Sanders and former vice president Joe Biden speak during a break at the Democratic presidential primary debate on Feb. 25 in Charleston, S.C. Sanders dropped out of the race Wednesday.
Democratic presidential candidates Senator Bernie Sanders and former vice president Joe Biden speak during a break at the Democratic presidential primary debate on Feb. 25 in Charleston, S.C. Sanders dropped out of the race Wednesday.Win McNamee/Photographer: Win McNamee/Getty

Media have handed the nomination to Biden

The media have handed the Democratic presidential nomination to Joe Biden. Over the past few weeks, all we have heard on the news is information about the COVID-19 pandemic. With polls closed across the country, apparently there has been no need to report on the 2020 presidential race. It is on hold.

However, whenever the major news outlets, such as CNN, have wanted an alternative sound bite to counter Donald Trump’s ignorant, pretentious rhetoric, they have featured Biden. This has essentially made him the Democratic nominee by creating a public mind-set that no amount of campaign donation money can buy. Before he dropped out of the race on Wednesday, Bernie Sanders was behind Biden in the delegate count, but not by that much. The competition was still healthy.

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Not anymore. The media has forestalled our choice.

Sanders dropped out because the media have given Biden prime air time amid a global pandemic, when fear and anxiety have the masses reaching for a genuine, substantial leader.

Unfortunately, we no longer have one.

John Tamilio III

Beverly


Let’s hope Sanders can rally round the party pick this time

Re “Sanders drops out, clearing way for Biden” (Page A1, April 9): Finally. This is such good and encouraging news, but it would have been better, and more hopeful, had Bernie Sanders been able to overcome his self-centeredness and taken his name off future ballots. Many of his progressive ideas have gained traction, especially with the onset of the COVID-19 crisis. They might have become more mainstream earlier if Sanders had been an effective team player during his long career, which consists more of bluster than accomplishment.

We will see what he is truly made of shortly. My hope is that he will take a note from his fellow progressives’ playbooks, such as Representative Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, who told supporters not to even think about voting for Donald Trump.

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Bernie’s message during the Clinton campaign was woefully weak, and his voters made the difference. We wait now for Elizabeth Warren, an effective team player, to make a convincing Biden endorsement.

Elizabeth Bjorkman

Lexington


Once-crowded field now should reunite — in unity

Now that Bernie Sanders has suspended his campaign, Joe Biden is the presumptive nominee. It’s been a long political season, with more than 20 candidates winnowed down to one. In the midst of a pandemic, what could get our attention? What if all the Democratic presidential candidates put aside their differences and got together to put Joe Biden in the White House? There were a lot of good ideas put out by the candidates over the past year. Why not put those ideas together?

Candidates from across the country and diverse economic backgrounds offered perspectives and solutions that speak to the needs of their constituents. Unity would be something new. Instead of attacking the policies of fellow Democrats, why not show that we can unite as a party to construct a way out of our dysfunctional political environment?

Imagine all of the Democratic hopefuls back together, only this time in a show of unity instead of competition — because it might take all of them to bring voters together to return us to a trustworthy, functioning federal government.

Andrea Golden

Arlington