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LETTERS

For the love of the game

Cy Young Award-winning pitcher Blake Snell (right), of the Tampa Bay Rays, hands the ball to manager Kevin Cash as he is taken out of a game against the Boston Red Sox during the second inning a game on Sept. 23, 2019, in St. Petersburg, Fla.
Cy Young Award-winning pitcher Blake Snell (right), of the Tampa Bay Rays, hands the ball to manager Kevin Cash as he is taken out of a game against the Boston Red Sox during the second inning a game on Sept. 23, 2019, in St. Petersburg, Fla.Chris O'Meara/Associated Press

After reading Friday’s lead article in the sports section, I was left wondering how we might best address the concerns of poor Blake Snell, the multimillionaire pitcher who seems unmotivated to forward the more mundane interests of baseball in these difficult times (“Snell: ‘I’m not playing unless I get mine’”). Could we just let him be and play without him?

Like many, I was encouraged to hear talk of salvaging a half-season of baseball. For most of us, living through the pandemic and our own personal issues has been a real challenge fraught with bad news and disappointment. Wouldn’t baseball provide a wonderful distraction for the second half of the summer? Wouldn’t we rather watch a cleanly turned double play than another update of coronavirus deaths? I know that baseball is more a business than a sport, but I’d like to believe that there are still a good number of players who respect the sanctity of the game and would like to contribute their skills to affirming the value of play and help us cope with the harsher realities of life. Let’s identify those players who love the game and want to play. Leave behind those players whose only interest is financial gain. I’d rather watch the games knowing that Blake Snell wasn’t playing. I would welcome a half-season of baseball played by those who truly love it.

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Brent A. Wilkes

Gloucester