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What you need to know about this week’s reopening

Massachusetts is still in the first stage of relaxing restrictions aimed at limiting the scope of COVID-19 infections, and the coming week will bring a few initial liberties ranging from haircuts to recreational marijuana.
Massachusetts is still in the first stage of relaxing restrictions aimed at limiting the scope of COVID-19 infections, and the coming week will bring a few initial liberties ranging from haircuts to recreational marijuana.John Tlumacki/Globe Staff

Massachusetts is still in the first stage of relaxing restrictions aimed at limiting the scope of COVID-19 infections, and the coming week will bring a few initial liberties ranging from haircuts to recreational marijuana. The four-stage plan will slowly allow an increase in the size of gatherings and a return inside businesses like restaurants and institutions like art museums. Each stage is expected to last at least three weeks — longer if health trends make delays necessary.

Here’s a list of what Governor Charlie Baker’s plan allows to open starting Monday.

Polishing Up: Hair salons and barbers can open by appointment only. Pet grooming services can open with appointments and curbside pet drop-off and pickup. Car washes can open.

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Buying: Retail stores and recreational marijuana dispensaries can launch curbside pickup.

Working: Office buildings and labs outside Boston can reopen, limited to 25 percent capacity. (Boston offices and labs, subject to the same limitations, will be allowed to reopen on June 1.)

Getting Out: Beaches, parks, drive-in theaters, zoos, and other outdoor areas like gardens, reserves, and public installations can reopen with social distancing limitations in place; some parking facilities may be reopened. Recreational boating facilities like yacht and boat clubs can reopen and activities such as charter fishing and white water rafting can begin, though no more than 10 people are allowed on a boat at a time. Outdoor adventure and education businesses that offer things like horseback riding, zip lines, mountain biking, and archery can start up again with distancing required unless participants live together.

The Department of Conservation and Recreation said Monday that some athletic fields and courts are now open for noncontact sports like tennis. Visitor centers and fitness areas will remain closed, as will most bathrooms, officials said. Playgrounds will remain closed until phase two of the state’s reopening plan. Baker’s order allows campsites to reopen, but DCR is keeping its campgrounds closed through June 7. The agency said it is considering reopening campgrounds at a reduced capacity at a later date.

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Getting There: The T will continue to run the same Saturday-level service it has since mid-March with all riders required to wear masks.


Lucas Phillips can be reached at lucas.phillips@globe.com.