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LETTERS

Asian-American statement of solidarity divides

Members of the Asian American Commission demonstrated on the steps of the State House in March to condemn racism toward the Asian-American community because of coronavirus.
Members of the Asian American Commission demonstrated on the steps of the State House in March to condemn racism toward the Asian-American community because of coronavirus.John Tlumacki/Globe Staff

Mass. commission’s statement has the right intent

As a longtime Asian-American activist who has worked in active solidarity with Black communities for decades, I want to express support for the intent of the Massachusetts Asian American Commission in releasing its “Statement in Support of Black Lives Matter” in this moment that cries out for justice (“Asian-American panel at odds over statement,” Metro, June 14).

I don’t agree 100 percent with the commission’s choice of words, such as “historic proximity to white privilege,” particularly as a blanket characterization for what remains a racialized and socioeconomically bipolar community. But for a few, more conservative Asian-American figureheads to focus their attack on one portion of the commission’s statement of solidarity is a distraction from the central issues: the criminalization of Black, brown, and immigrant communities and the broad, popular call for police accountability.

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Like the Asian American Commission, hundreds of Asian-American organizations across the country have joined this call because we know that the road to equality and justice for Asian-Americans is the road that Black communities have been traveling for 400 years.

Lydia Lowe

Director

Chinatown Community Land Trust

Boston


Asian-Americans can stand in support and still examine their own biases

I am writing in response to “Asian-American panel at odds over statement.” While the Asian American Commission statement may have been poorly worded at times, in particular the phrase suggesting Asian-Americans’ “proximity to white privilege,” my organization supports the general positions of the commission’s statement, which calls for Asian-Americans to stand in solidarity with Black Americans, and for Asian-Americans to examine anti-Blackness within our community.

Asian-Americans have long endured the “model minority” myth, which is used as a cudgel against Black Americans and other people of color, blaming them for conditions created by systemic racism by pointing out the supposed success of Asian-Americans.

We also dispute the notion that calling out anti-Blackness within our community is divisive. We can support Black Lives Matter, do the hard work of self-reflection on our own biases, and honor the experiences of our immigrant parents and grandparents. We do not have to choose any one of these actions over another.

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Angie Liou

Executive director

Asian Community Development Corp.

Boston