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A swan is rescued, and a stolen scooter is recovered

Mike Brammer, a field services agent with the Animal Rescue League of Boston, helped capture this injured swan in Woburn on June 17.
Mike Brammer, a field services agent with the Animal Rescue League of Boston, helped capture this injured swan in Woburn on June 17.Animal Rescue League of Boston

Every day, police officers respond to reports of all sorts of events and nonevents, most of which never make the news. Here is a sampling of lesser-known — but no less noteworthy — incidents from police log books (a.k.a. blotters) in our suburbs.

SWAN RESCUE

On June 17, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s Field Services Department helped Woburn Animal Control capture an injured swan at Horn Pond. Officials at the Animal Rescue League said the male swan had a small fish hook caught in his right foot and had been suffering for several days. To regular visitors of the pond, the swan and his mate are something of a celebrity couple. The rescue was especially challenging because the swans are raising offspring, and they are very protective of their young and leery of humans. A number of bystanders watched as ARL field services agent Mike Brammer gently snared the swan with a net and pulled him to shore, and, with the help of the animal control officer and “a bystander who has an affinity for the swan family,” carefully placed the swan into a crate. The swan was then taken to New England Wildlife Center in Weymouth where the hook was removed and he was treated with antibiotics and pain medication. The swan was returned to Horn Pond and reunited with his family just a few hours later.

SCOOT PURSUIT

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At 2:27 p.m. May 7, a police officer monitoring traffic at the intersection of Main and Cross streets in Watertown spotted a Vespa-style scooter going approximately 50 miles per hour on the wrong side of the road. Watertown Police said when the officer tried to stop the scooter, a chase ensued. The scooter ran through red lights in Watertown Square and continued on Charles River Road before coming to a stop at Wheeler Lane. When the officer got out of the cruiser the man tried to make a U-turn and get away, but the officer was able to subdue him before he could escape. Police soon learned that the scooter had been stolen. The operator, a 26-year-old Waltham man, was arrested and charged with several offenses, including speeding, two red light violations, failing to stop for a police officer, operating without a helmet and eyewear, resisting arrest, and receiving stolen property over $1,200.

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TEMPER TANTRUMS

At 10:42 a.m. June 12, a woman called Wilmington police and said a man got angry with her and kicked a shopping cart into her vehicle in the CVS parking lot. Later that same day, at 12:25 p.m., police in Saugus received a 911 call from a manager at Burger King who said a customer was “not happy with the fact his credit card did not work” and smashed the windows in the front of the store. At 9:39 p.m. Wilmington police responded to a report that a man climbed into the drive-through window at Simard’s Super Roast Beef and threatened the staff there. According to the log entry, police located the man on foot in front of Golden Ginger, and the staff ultimately did not wish to press charges.

NAUGHTY NOTE

At 8:33 p.m. June 14, Saugus police received a call from a woman on Hamilton Street who said she found a note under her door “requesting an indecent proposal for a sum of money,” and it was addressed from another unit in the building. Officer Vincent Johnston was dispatched to the scene and reported that “after speaking with the elderly female who resides” in that unit, he was “confident that she was not the person who sent the note.”

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LATE NIGHT VISIT

At 11:15 p.m. June 15, Peabody police received a call from someone who saw a few people with flashlights in Maple Hill Cemetery off Sabino Farm Road. According to the log entry, an officer went to the cemetery and spoke to a man who said he was there “visiting his aunt’s headstone,” and otherwise everything was in order.



Emily Sweeney can be reached at emily.sweeney@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @emilysweeney.