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LETTERS

Councilor Michelle Wu has drawn a bright line on police accountability

Boston City Councilor Michelle Wu spoke last year at a press conference of the Union of Concerned Scientists in Chinatown.
Boston City Councilor Michelle Wu spoke last year at a press conference of the Union of Concerned Scientists in Chinatown.Jonathan Wiggs/Globe Staff

One name keeps popping up in this week’s coverage of Boston City Hall.

Michelle Wu was among the city councilors proposing that Boston respond to 911 calls involving mental health, homelessness, substance use, and traffic crashes with public health professionals rather than law enforcement officers.

Wu released documents related to the Boston Police Department’s purchase of military-style equipment and data on the department’s internal investigations into use of force and on racial disparities in no-knock warrants.

Wu, along with Councilor Ricardo Arroyo, led the way on barring the city from using facial recognition technology, given concerns about racial discrimination and the violation of privacy rights.

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Wu pushed for a “no” vote on the city budget so that more funding could be reallocated from police to social services and community organizations, as residents have demanded in recent weeks.

For anyone who’s been paying careful attention recently, it’s pretty clear who’s providing progressive, responsive leadership in Boston.

Garrett Casey

Cambridge