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LETTERS

May this storm we’re in now move us toward something greater

A protest march on June 22 in honor of Rayshard Brooks, sponsored by Black Lives Matter Boston and Violence in Boston Inc., started at the Reggie Lewis Center in Roxbury and ended in front of the State House. A man holds two young children as they listen to a speaker.
A protest march on June 22 in honor of Rayshard Brooks, sponsored by Black Lives Matter Boston and Violence in Boston Inc., started at the Reggie Lewis Center in Roxbury and ended in front of the State House. A man holds two young children as they listen to a speaker.Jim Davis/Globe Staff

In regard to the question from the Globe about how we in the Black community are coping and our thoughts during this time: Well, I’m a Black father and grandfather of young grown men, so of course I’m extremely concerned and troubled about the vicious and inhumane criminal justice (“just us”) system and the absolutely brutal and destructive law enforcement system in this country.

I‘m very proud of the courageous young people in our community and those of other communities who have the spirit and fortitude to step out on faith, thereby giving us older generations renewed hope for their future. We must absolutely support them in the best way possible, as a community, for ours is a generational struggle.

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All of these events are somehow intertwined into what seems like a perfect storm, hopefully moving us all toward something greater once we’ve come through it. If those in the white community are truly sincere and continue to really listen to us and support us, then we can start to elect new people who are willing to take on the challenge to truly change and, if necessary, dismantle these inhumane and immoral post-slavery systems.

The most profound lesson about the coronavirus pandemic is that we have had to learn to trust and treat others the way we would want to be treated, as respectful human beings.

Dannie Morris

Dorchester