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LETTERS

Protesters have witnessed this officer’s rough ways

Boston Police Captain John Danilecki pepper sprays the crowd during the Straight Pride march and rally and counterprotests outside City Hall Plaza on Aug. 31, 2019.
Boston Police Captain John Danilecki pepper sprays the crowd during the Straight Pride march and rally and counterprotests outside City Hall Plaza on Aug. 31, 2019.Matthew J. Lee/Globe Staff/The Boston Globe

Police captain has long been a concern

I was glad to see “A captain at the crossroads with activists” on the front page of the June 25 edition. The violence meted out by Captain John “Jack” Danilecki warrants investigation by the Boston Police Department and Mayor Martin Walsh.

Following the police riot at the Straight Pride event last August, I wrote to Mayor Walsh about the excessive use of force by police against counterprotesters. I brought to the mayor’s attention Captain Danilecki, Helmet #8947, no badge visible, who provoked and punished protesters by using pepper spray without restraint.

From my letter to the mayor: “I fervently hope and pray that I never meet [Danilecki] in the streets because he is a frightening man in a Boston Police Department uniform.” I received no response from Mayor Walsh nor anyone in his administration.

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I am appalled that, according to your story, Danilecki received a commendation from the BPD 10 days after his violence against the counterprotesters. I have no faith that “Pepper Jack,” as he is known, will ever be held accountable for his actions, given the blue wall of silence that protects him and others.

Sue Hyde

Cambridge


Slap on the wrist is not accountability

Much of what is wrong with police administration in Boston is embodied by a small detail in your article about police Captain John Danilecki, who in 2004 was investigated by the Boston Police Department after the Globe in 2004 identified “17 instances of so-called ‘double-dipping’ — collecting pay while working private details in different locations simultaneously.” The charges were sustained, and the sanction? A “verbal reprimand.”

In the real world, such conduct would be something for which ordinary people get terminated forthwith.

This is yet another clear illustration of the ongoing moral bankruptcy of the BPD. Ignoring this kind of blatant economic abuse by the department’s officers has been an open secret for decades.

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Daniel Solomon

Boston