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Sports Flashback: What is your favorite home run in Red Sox history?

Carlton Fisk waved his famous home run fair in Game 6 of the 1975 World Series.
Carlton Fisk waved his famous home run fair in Game 6 of the 1975 World Series.Harry Cabluck/Associated Press

The Boston Globe and The Sports Museum have teamed up to provide occasional looks back at the good old days of Boston sports, featuring the responses to prompts posted on the museum’s Facebook page from Rusty Sullivan, the museum’s executive director.

The question

On June 9, 1946, Ted Williams hit a mammoth home run into the Fenway bleachers, landing way up in Section 42 and breaking the straw hat of one Mr. Joseph Boucher. The blast continues to be celebrated today with the famous red seat. It was a vintage Ted moment and a great home run, for sure. What are some of your favorite home runs in Boston Red Sox history — and why?

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The responses

▪ Tony C on two Opening Days. A home run in his first Fenway Park at-bat in 1964 and a home run in Baltimore in his comeback season in 1969. Both were remarkable.

▪ Who could forget Pudge Fisk’s walkoff home run in Game 6 against the Reds in the 1975 World Series?

▪ Fisk, Game 6, 1975 World Series; Don Baylor and Dave Henderson, Game 5, 1986 ALCS.

Dave Henderson celebrates after his homer in the ninth inning of Game 5 of the 1986 ALCS.
Dave Henderson celebrates after his homer in the ninth inning of Game 5 of the 1986 ALCS.Tlumacki, John Globe Staff

▪ Fisk Game 6, Ortiz ’04, Mookie’s 13-pitch grand slam.

▪ Of those I’ve seen live, five stand out: Bernie Carbo and Carlton Fisk vs. the Reds in ’75 World Series, Trot Nixon vs. Oakland in 2003 ALDS; J.D. Drew (grand slam) vs. Cleveland in 2007 ALCS; and David Ortiz (grand slam) vs. Detroit in 2013 ALCS. Honorable mention: Saw Mark McGwire hit one onto the roof at Tiger Stadium.

▪ Watching Jim Rice’s home runs that cleared the Green Monster screen or his moon shots over the CF wall. Mark McGwire during the Home Run Derby in ’99 was also memorable. But the most amazing home run I saw was in 1977 when Dave Kingman, who had just been acquired by the Yankees, hit a ball off of Reggie Cleveland that went over the left-field light tower into the night.

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The red seat marks the spot where Ted Williams's mammoth home run in 1946 landed.
The red seat marks the spot where Ted Williams's mammoth home run in 1946 landed.CHIN, BARRY/GLOBE STAFF PHOTO

▪ In terms of the longest I’ve seen, I’ve been at two three-home run games at Fenway, Rice in 1977 and McGwire in 1995. Each of them hit titanic shots. Rice’s second home run was a line drive that was still rising when it barely cleared the top of the screen in left-center. McGwire’s third landed at the back of the parking deck across the street. That one was probably the longest I’ve seen.

As for most important, though, I witnessed Mark Bellhorn’s game-winner off the foul pole in Game 1 of the 2004 World Series. I also feel privileged to have seen Hank Aaron (of the Brewers) homer against the Yankees in Shea Stadium in 1975, even though I was sitting in the top deck.

Mark Bellhorn watches his two-run homer in the eighth inning of Game 1 of the 2004 World Series.
Mark Bellhorn watches his two-run homer in the eighth inning of Game 1 of the 2004 World Series.Davis, Jim Globe Staff

▪ How about the shot Bo Jackson hit? It hit the bricks in the bleachers above the seat a bit left of center.

▪ Fenway was fun before the wind was suppressed by the .406 Club. Now it’s more a doubles or triples park.

▪ Who else (as a lifelong Dodgers fan) — Gibby!! By the way, my season tickets to the Sox were in Section 42 (Row 25) and I would marvel at that red seat every time I went to a game.

▪ The greatest hitter of all time .406.

▪ Ted Williams . . . The best that ever was.

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