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LETTERS

Parking lots across the state present a big opportunity for solar

Solar panels surround the Learning Courtyard at the King Open/Cambridge Street Upper Schools & Community Complex in Cambridge.
Solar panels surround the Learning Courtyard at the King Open/Cambridge Street Upper Schools & Community Complex in Cambridge.Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

In reading “Rays, objections: State prepares rules that would limit clearing of forests to build solar farms” (Page A1, July), I think again about the wonderful use Roxbury Community College made of its parking lot space. The lot has been turned into an overhead solar array.

The benefits of such an array are manyfold: clean energy use for the college; removal of the heat-attracting properties of the black tar, thus cooling the cars below; and protection of cars in rain and snow.

What could it look like if municipalities, shopping malls, and institutions across the city of Boston and the Commonwealth did the same, turning parking lots into community shared solar enterprises for everyone’s benefit? There are miles and miles of open, black-tar parking lots; one prime example is the shopping center along Morrissey Boulevard across from the Dorchester Shores Reservation.

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There is a parking lot across from where I live, in Jamaica Plain, in the South Street Development that, if given a solar array, could help alleviate the energy burden for residents’ bills.

These are just some examples. I know that Western and Central Massachusetts have tons of open lots as well. Let’s make use of them for all our benefit and save some trees.

Sara Driscoll

Jamaica Plain