fb-pixel;
LETTERS

On Markey, it’s the whys and wherefores that matter, not the where

Representative Joseph P. Kennedy III and Senator Edward J. Markey debated on July 26. Kennedy has raised questions over how much time Markey spends in his home state.
Representative Joseph P. Kennedy III and Senator Edward J. Markey debated on July 26. Kennedy has raised questions over how much time Markey spends in his home state.NBC10 Boston

Counting his Mass. slumbers is no way to measure US senator’s worth

Counting the number of days a member of Congress comes back to his or her home state rather than staying in Washington, D.C., is a shallow way to judge a candidate’s worth (”Markey was least likely legislator to be in Mass.,” Page A1, July 28). Although the article does report that Senator Edward J. Markey’s wife has a professional practice in Washington, which would account for a couple’s wishing to spend time together during work respites, it fails to note as well that Senator Elizabeth Warren has a husband who resides in Massachusetts. Warren would want to be with her spouse for similar reasons, and that would account for the fact that she spends more days in Massachusetts than Markey.

Advertisement



Meanwhile, Markey has been promoting progressive views since his opponent, Representative Joseph P. Kennedy III, was still wet behind his ears. More important is that Markey has successfully introduced or sponsored legislation that directly benefits our state.

Should the Democrats be fortunate enough to become the majority party in the Senate, Markey’s seniority would place him in a position to lead, especially in preserving Social Security, expanding health care, and passing measures that protect our climate and environment.

Barbara L. Cullen

Watertown


Globe’s endorsement of Markey underscores his value

In this age of a raging coronavirus marked by threats to the economy, education, socialization, and equitably distributed health and employment opportunities, we should ask ourselves: What is newsworthy? I do not believe that the front-page article “Markey was least likely legislator to be in Mass.” meets this standard. Its headline and much of its content imply, whether intended or not, that Edward J. Markey has been remiss in meeting his senatorial obligations.

Such an impression runs contrary to the Globe editorial board’s endorsement of Markey in the Senate primary (“Send Ed Markey back to the Senate,” July 28). Any reader of this editorial and the many reasons it gives should readily conclude that Markey has done an outstanding job regardless of where he sleeps.

Advertisement



We elect US senators primarily to represent the best interests of the nation. This is best accomplished by their advocating for and writing legislation in Washington, D.C., on worthy causes — not by counting the number of sleepovers in their home states. Our other elected legislators might learn from Markey’s example.

David Maxwell

Duxbury