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Vigil planned for Eurie Stamps Sr., who was shot by Framingham police in 2011

Malik Harding, 7, is flanked by his parents, LaRoy, left, and Ashley during a march to demand justice for Eurie Stamps in Cambridge Aug. 1. Stamps was a 68-year-old man who was shot and killed by Framingham police during a 2011 drug raid at his home.
Malik Harding, 7, is flanked by his parents, LaRoy, left, and Ashley during a march to demand justice for Eurie Stamps in Cambridge Aug. 1. Stamps was a 68-year-old man who was shot and killed by Framingham police during a 2011 drug raid at his home.Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff/The Boston Globe

Eurie Stamps Sr., a man shot in his home by Framingham police in 2011, will be honored during a vigil Saturday, Aug. 15, at the city’s Memorial Building.

Organizers of the vigil, along with a march through Cambridge earlier this month, are demanding recognition for Stamps amid national Black Lives Matter demonstrations.

“Friends and supporters of racial justice are calling for the name of Eurie Stamps Sr. to be added to the roll of the victims of police violence,” according to a statement from organizers.

The vigil is planned for 2 p.m. in front of the Memorial Building at 150 Concord St., the statement said.

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The Framingham police SWAT team raided Stamps’s home on Jan. 5, 2011, to execute a search warrant. They were acting on a report that Stamps’s stepson and others were selling crack cocaine from the apartment.

Stamps, 68, was not a suspect. He was ordered to the ground by police, and was shot by Framingham Officer Paul K. Duncan as the officer moved to handcuff Stamps.

A subsequent investigation determined that Duncan shot Stamps accidentally.

Framingham reached a $3.75 million settlement with Stamps’s family and estate in 2016.

Duncan remains on the city’s police force and was never charged in the case.

Stamps grew up in Cambridge as part of a large family, and worked as a maintenance employee for the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority. After his retirement, he moved to Framingham. He was a grandfather to 15 children and had a great-grandchild.

" ‘Big Eur’ was known for his big heart and his support for youth sports,” the statement said.

The vigil follows an Aug. 1 march through Stamps’s hometown of Cambridge, where demonstrators demanded accountability for his death.

Middlesex District Attorney Marian T. Ryan, who took office in 2013, has pledged to release materials from the nearly decade-old case.

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John Hilliard can be reached at john.hilliard@globe.com.