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Baseball notebook

Busy Marlins end seven-game series with third straight win over Phillies

Miami's Starling Marte, who also homered Monday, scores on a third-inning double as Philadelphia's Rafael Marchan waits for the throw.
Miami's Starling Marte, who also homered Monday, scores on a third-inning double as Philadelphia's Rafael Marchan waits for the throw.Lynne Sladky/Associated Press

Pablo Lopez allowed one run in seven innings with the help of flashy defense by right fielder Matt Joyce, and the Miami Marlins won Game 7 of their marathon series against visiting Philadelphia on Monday, 6-2.

The series, the majors' longest in the regular season in 53 years, included three makeup games and two doubleheaders. The Marlins won five of the seven games, including the final three, to move into second place in the NL East, 1½ games ahead of Philadelphia.

The Marlins, who last had a day off Sept. 3, are in the middle of a 24-day stretch with 28 games. The Red Sox come to Miami for three games, starting Tuesday, before the Marlins host the Nationals for five games in three days.

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Lopez (4-4) bounced back from his worst outing of the year by allowing only three hits and retiring his final 13 batters. He was helped by not one but two over-the-shoulder basket catches on the warning track by Joyce, who robbed Scott Kingery and Jean Segura.

The only run Lopez allowed came on Andrew McCutchen’s seventh homer to start the game. Philadelphia totaled four hits without J.T. Realmuto and Rhys Hoskins, who were both nursing injuries.

Jesus Aguilar put the Marlins ahead with a two-run double in the third. Miguel Rojas hit his third home run and Starling Marte added his fifth, both off David Phelps.

Steve Cohen reaches agreement to buy Mets

Billionaire hedge fund manager Steve Cohen has agreed to buy the New York Mets from the Wilpon and Katz families.

The team announced the agreement Monday. The deal is subject to the approval of Major League Baseball owners.

Cohen also entered negotiations to buy the Mets last year, but the deal fell apart in February. He bought an 8 percent limited partnership stake in 2012 for $40 million. The deal that failed to close would have seen him acquire an 80 percent controlling share in a transaction that valued the team at $2.6 billion.

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Steve Cohen got some good news on Monday -- he'll be the new owner of the Mets.
Steve Cohen got some good news on Monday -- he'll be the new owner of the Mets.Sasha Arutyunova/NYT

The current Mets ownership group is headed by Fred Wilpon, brother-in-law Saul Katz, and Wilpon’s son Jeff, the team’s chief operating officer.

Cohen first bought into the Mets when the team sought $20 million minority investment stakes following the collapse of Bernard Madoff’s Ponzi scheme, which heavily cost the Wilpons and their companies. The limited partnership shares were sold after a proposed $200 million sale of a stake of the Mets to hedge fund manager David Einhorn fell through in 2011.

The 64-year-old Cohen is CEO and president of Point72 Asset Management.

Cohen controlled SAC Capital Advisors, which in 2013 pleaded guilty to criminal fraud charges. SAC agreed to pay a $900 million fine and forfeit another $900 million to the federal government, though $616 million that SAC companies had already agreed to pay to settle parallel actions by the Securities and Exchange Commission was to be deducted from the $1.8 billion.

The publisher Doubleday & Co. bought the Mets in 1980 from the family of founding owner Joan Payson for $21.1 million, with the company owning 95 percent of the team and Fred Wilpon controlling 5%.

When Doubleday & Co. was sold to the media company Bertelsmann AG in 1986, the publisher sold its shares of the team for nearly $81 million to Fred Wilpon and Nelson Doubleday, who became 50-50 owners.

Wilpon led a buyout of Doubleday’s shares in 2002 and became chairman and sole controlling owner. Katz, the owner’s brother-in-law and partner in the real estate firm Sterling Equities Inc., became team president and Jeff Wilpon became COO.

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Pinch me! Rookie hits walkoff homer

Rookie Tyler Stephenson was called on to be a pinch-hitter in the seventh inning and responded by hitting a two-run walkoff homer in the seventh inning, lifting the Cincinnati Reds to a 3-1 victory over the visiting Pirates in the opener of a doubleheader.

With two out and the bases empty, rookie Jose Garcia singled to left against Sam Howard (2-2). Manager David Bell then sent Stephenson up to hit for Shogo Akiyama, and the young catcher hit a drive to left for his second homer.

The 24-year-old Stephenson lifted his batting helmet off his head with his left hand and pumped both arms in the sir before being swarmed by teammates at the plate.

Trevor Bauer and Cincinnati carried a 1-0 lead into the seventh, but Colin Moran led off with his eighth homer. Bauer had retired 14 consecutive batters before Moran’s towering fly ball into the seats in right.

Bauer, who was trying for his third seven-inning shutout of the pandemic-shortened season, was pulled with one out and two on. Raisel Iglesias (3-3) then struck out pinch-hitter Gregory Polanco and John Ryan Murphy.

Mariners sneak up on A’s

Kyle Lewis sparked Seattle’s rally with a two-run homer and walked with the bases loaded in the sixth inning, helping the host Mariners top the Oakland Athletics, 6-5, in the opener of a doubleheader.

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The win pulled Seattle within one game of idle Houston for second place in the AL West.

Seattle's Kyle Lewis pumps his fist after he was walked with the bases loaded in the sixth inning of the first game of Monday's twinbill with Oakland.
Seattle's Kyle Lewis pumps his fist after he was walked with the bases loaded in the sixth inning of the first game of Monday's twinbill with Oakland.Ted S. Warren/Associated Press

Seattle trailed, 5-0, after home runs by Sean Murphy and Marcus Semien off Marco Gonzales. But Seattle chipped away and scored twice in the sixth inning against Oakland’s bullpen to move in front for good. Tim Lopes’s third double of the game drove in Phillip Ervin with two outs, tying it at 5. Oakland’s Joakim Soria (2-2) struggled with his control and walked three straight batters after Lopes’s double, the last one on four pitches to Lewis.

Luis Torrens and Jose Marmolejos each hit a solo drive off Jesus Luzardo to start Seattle’s rally. Lewis hit his 10th homer in the fifth inning to pull Seattle within 5-4 and end Luzardo’s day.