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SEASONAL RECIPES

Recipe: Her mother’s extra-long mandelbrot with bittersweet chocolate chips are seriously delicious

Bittersweet Chocolate Chip Mandelbrot
Bittersweet Chocolate Chip MandelbrotSheryl Julian

Makes 24 extra-long or 36 long cookies

My mother, Irene, was obsessed with mandlebrot (mandel means almond, brot means bread in German and Yiddish), which she called "mandel breit," another name for the twice-baked cookies. They're often translated as mandel bread. Hers probably came in a recipe swap among neighbors. The original formula, a dense almond-based dough flavored with citrus, was baked in metal ice cube trays with the dividers removed, and, after baking, cut crosswise into slices. The typical method for mandelbrot is to shape the dough into logs and slice them when baked. Here, a dough studded with bittersweet chocolate chips instead of almonds is spread in a rimmed baking sheet (at this point, you can sprinkle it with granulated sugar if you want a lustrous sugar finish), baked, then cut into long bars, and baked again. The cookies are 7-to 8-inches long (you can also cut shorter 5-inch pieces). They're seriously delicious extra-long mandelbrot. I hope the baker who taught me is sending beams of approval.

Vegetable oil (for the pan)
cups flour
teaspoons baking powder
½teaspoon salt
1package (12 ounces) miniature or regular bittersweet or semisweet chocolate chips
4 eggs
1cup sugar
2teaspoon vanilla extract
10tablespoons (1 stick plus 2 tablespoons) unsalted butter, melted and cooled but still liquid
½cup vegetable oil

1. Set the oven at 350 degrees. Lightly oil the sides and bottom of a rimmed baking sheet (about 10-by-15-inches). Line the pan with a piece of parchment paper that extends about 2 inches above the short sides. Press the paper onto the oiled bottom and sides of the pan.

2. In a bowl, whisk the flour, baking powder, and salt to blend them. In another small bowl, toss the chocolate chips with 2 teaspoons of the flour mixture.

3. In an electric mixer, beat the eggs at medium-high speed, for 1 minute. Add the sugar and continue beating for 2 minutes, or until the mixture is creamy looking and expands in volume. Add the vanilla and beat for 30 seconds. Add the butter and oil and beat for 1 minute more. Reduce the mixer speed to its lowest setting. Add the flour mixture in 2 additions, scraping down the sides of the bowl once or twice, mixing only until the flour is just absorbed.

4. Remove the bowl from the mixer stand. With a large rubber spatula, stir in the chocolate chips. Spoon the batter into the pan into 6 mounds, then use a rubber spatula or offset spatula to spread it so it fills the entire pan. Make sure the thickness is even.

5. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until the baked rectangle is pale golden. Set the pan on a wire rack for 20 minutes to cool.

6. Lower the oven temperature to 300 degrees.

7. Cut the baked rectangle in half horizontally and vertically to create 4 large pieces. Use a wide metal spatuals to lift them from the baking sheet and transfer to a cutting board.

8. With a long, flat-edged knife, make 5 vertical cuts in each piece to form 6 long mandelbrot from each quarter (total 24). You can also make shorter mandelbrot by making horizontal 8 cuts to form 9 long strips (total 36).

9. Return the cookies to the baking sheet cut-sides up. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, turning them halfway through baking, or until they are firm and golden brown. Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. Store in an airtight tin.

Lisa Yockelson

Makes 24 extra-long or 36 long cookies

My mother, Irene, was obsessed with mandlebrot (mandel means almond, brot means bread in German and Yiddish), which she called "mandel breit," another name for the twice-baked cookies. They're often translated as mandel bread. Hers probably came in a recipe swap among neighbors. The original formula, a dense almond-based dough flavored with citrus, was baked in metal ice cube trays with the dividers removed, and, after baking, cut crosswise into slices. The typical method for mandelbrot is to shape the dough into logs and slice them when baked. Here, a dough studded with bittersweet chocolate chips instead of almonds is spread in a rimmed baking sheet (at this point, you can sprinkle it with granulated sugar if you want a lustrous sugar finish), baked, then cut into long bars, and baked again. The cookies are 7-to 8-inches long (you can also cut shorter 5-inch pieces). They're seriously delicious extra-long mandelbrot. I hope the baker who taught me is sending beams of approval.

Vegetable oil (for the pan)
cups flour
teaspoons baking powder
½teaspoon salt
1package (12 ounces) miniature or regular bittersweet or semisweet chocolate chips
4 eggs
1cup sugar
2teaspoon vanilla extract
10tablespoons (1 stick plus 2 tablespoons) unsalted butter, melted and cooled but still liquid
½cup vegetable oil

1. Set the oven at 350 degrees. Lightly oil the sides and bottom of a rimmed baking sheet (about 10-by-15-inches). Line the pan with a piece of parchment paper that extends about 2 inches above the short sides. Press the paper onto the oiled bottom and sides of the pan.

2. In a bowl, whisk the flour, baking powder, and salt to blend them. In another small bowl, toss the chocolate chips with 2 teaspoons of the flour mixture.

3. In an electric mixer, beat the eggs at medium-high speed, for 1 minute. Add the sugar and continue beating for 2 minutes, or until the mixture is creamy looking and expands in volume. Add the vanilla and beat for 30 seconds. Add the butter and oil and beat for 1 minute more. Reduce the mixer speed to its lowest setting. Add the flour mixture in 2 additions, scraping down the sides of the bowl once or twice, mixing only until the flour is just absorbed.

4. Remove the bowl from the mixer stand. With a large rubber spatula, stir in the chocolate chips. Spoon the batter into the pan into 6 mounds, then use a rubber spatula or offset spatula to spread it so it fills the entire pan. Make sure the thickness is even.

5. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until the baked rectangle is pale golden. Set the pan on a wire rack for 20 minutes to cool.

6. Lower the oven temperature to 300 degrees.

7. Cut the baked rectangle in half horizontally and vertically to create 4 large pieces. Use a wide metal spatuals to lift them from the baking sheet and transfer to a cutting board.

8. With a long, flat-edged knife, make 5 vertical cuts in each piece to form 6 long mandelbrot from each quarter (total 24). You can also make shorter mandelbrot by making horizontal 8 cuts to form 9 long strips (total 36).

9. Return the cookies to the baking sheet cut-sides up. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, turning them halfway through baking, or until they are firm and golden brown. Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. Store in an airtight tin.Lisa Yockelson