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MUSEUMS

Indoor galleries reopen Thursday at deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum

Angela Dufresne's "To Learn Is to Forget," from 2015, is part of the "Visionary New England" exhibition.
Angela Dufresne's "To Learn Is to Forget," from 2015, is part of the "Visionary New England" exhibition.Susan Alzner/Collection of Angela Dufresne

Welcome another one back to the land of the living: The deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum reopens its indoor galleries Thursday with a pair of brand-new shows, both long delayed as COVID-19 threw exhibition schedules into disarray. Visitors have been able to enjoy the museum’s lush grounds for many months, with the Trustees of Reservations opening the rolling 30-acre campus to the public as the weather turned warm. But the museum itself, perched high above Flint’s Pond, had the air of an abandoned fortress, sealed tight and silent. Life returns, finally, with two shows that strike a bright, optimistic tone: “Visionary New England,” about the pervasiveness of utopian experimentation throughout the region, and “Transcendental Modernism,” which offers a broader take on the narrow tale of Modernism to include movements like Afro-futurism and crossover experiments between art and science. Advance tickets are required for indoor and outdoor visits. Reserve your spot via thetrustees.org/decordova.

Sam Durant's "Transcendental (Wheatley's Desk, Emerson's Chair)," from 2016, is part of the Visionary New England exhibition.
Sam Durant's "Transcendental (Wheatley's Desk, Emerson's Chair)," from 2016, is part of the Visionary New England exhibition.Joshua White/Courtesy Sam Durant and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo

Murray Whyte can be reached at murray.whyte@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @TheMurrayWhyte.