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LETTERS

The Barrett hearings: wrestling with a foregone conclusion

Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett takes off her mask at the witness table after recess during the second day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on Oct. 13.
Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett takes off her mask at the witness table after recess during the second day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on Oct. 13.Drew Angerer/Getty

Conservatives would welcome the distraction of another culture war

Re “Catholics hold court as Barrett hearings begin” by Jazmine Ulloa (Page A1, Oct. 11): “The dogma lives loudly within you,” as spoken by Senator Dianne Feinstein to Amy Coney Barrett during Barrett’s 2017 confirmation hearing for the US Court of Appeals in Chicago, reflects a flawed understanding of American Catholics. If Senate Democrats focus on scrutinizing that dogma, it will indulge the controversy over Barrett’s religious convictions. Catholic conservatives are salivating for another culture war to distract attention away from Barrett’s judicial record.

Catholics do not, as Boston College professor Thomas Groome reminds us, march in lockstep. The dogma lives in me to a certain extent as well, but I am not a partisan of Justice Antonin Scalia’s way of thinking. My favorite Supreme Court justice was David Souter.

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Gene Roman

The Bronx, N.Y.


The question he’d put to the judge

It’s clear that Amy Coney Barrett will be affirmed as a justice on the Supreme Court. To attack her views on sensitive subjects will be fruitless and will further polarize the public opinion of the court as a political body.

My question to Barrett would be: “If your nomination is confirmed by the Senate, in order to avoid the appearance of a conflict of interest, and preserve the reputation of the court as an impartial arbiter, would you agree to be sworn in on the morning of Jan. 20, 2021?”

R. Peter Shapiro

Dedham


A little courage sought from GOP senators

For centuries Americans have gone to war and put their lives on the line for their country. It would be better for our country if a few more Senate Republicans had the courage to put their political lives on the line and not vote to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court until after the election.

Angelo DeBenedictis

Carlisle


Known by the company she keeps

There are numerous reasons that the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett for the Supreme Court should be rejected. However, that she is willing to be a nominee of Donald Trump is sufficient for me.

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Robert G. Bill

Quincy