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LETTERS

State Police corruption is an outrage, a travesty, and sadly, an ongoing story

Members of the Massachusetts State Police 85th Recruit Training Troop marched out of Gillette Stadium after Governor Charlie Baker swore them in at a graduation ceremony in May.
Members of the Massachusetts State Police 85th Recruit Training Troop marched out of Gillette Stadium after Governor Charlie Baker swore them in at a graduation ceremony in May.Jonathan Wiggs/Globe Staff

Re “Problem troopers stay on the force” (Page A1, Oct. 18): Congratulations to the Globe for not letting go of this story. The systemic corruption in the ranks of the Massachusetts State Police, especially among its leadership, is not only appalling. It’s also deeply damaging to our trust in law enforcement.

Governor Baker and the Legislature have failed to adequately address this outrageous ongoing story of corrupt cops. How many more reports of State Police operating criminally and fraudulently will our elected officials need to see before they act decisively? Without an independent, third-party investigation, followed up by a complete restructuring of the State Police (including the union) and new leadership from the outside, this situation will continue to fester.

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It is frightening to think that so many of these troopers, with so much power over citizens, are themselves criminals. It will be a long time, if ever, before I trust and respect the Massachusetts State Police. Should I ever be pulled over by a state trooper, how could I not wonder whether this person was among the corrupt?

Vito LaMura

Gloucester


I want to thank Matt Rocheleau for his front-page article on State Police corruption. In addition to what we’ve seen in the widespread overtime scandal, as previously reported by Rocheleau and the Globe, many officers guilty of even more egregious misconduct also get to keep their jobs and pensions.

Why not begin police reform by prosecuting and firing police we already know are criminals?

That State Police leadership, the Legislature, and the state attorney general’s office are essentially letting criminal state troopers off the hook is a travesty and an insult to honest State Police officers, and it shows that Massachusetts lacks the collective backbone to implement meaningful police reform.

Dominic Brown

Acton

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