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Bumbleberry Farms turns honey into creamy spreads, and crafts flavors based on what plants bees feast on

Sweet Orange Blossom comes from Florida beekeepers, and Blueberry Blossom Honey from bees feasting on the blooms of Maine blueberry bushes

Single-flower honeys bottled at Bumbleberry Farms in Somerset, Pa.
Single-flower honeys bottled at Bumbleberry Farms in Somerset, Pa.Handout

Beekeeper Karen Mosholder founded Bumbleberry Farms in Somerset, Pa., and sells honey from her apiaries and crafts honey cream spreads in peppermint mocha, caramel pear cardamom, and pumpkin spice. She also bottles a line of single-flower honey from beekeepers around the country. One is Avocado Blossom Honey from honeybees pollinating flowers of California and Arizona avocado trees. The honey is molasses-like; its color dark and tastes nothing like avocado. Another, Sweet Orange Blossom, light and citrusy, comes from Florida beekeepers, who harvest honey from hives near orange trees. “Bees are floral loyal,” says Mosholder. “Put hives close to a flowering plant, and they’ll take the path of least resistance.” Other choices include a delicate but richly flavored Blueberry Blossom Honey from bees feasting on the blooms of Maine blueberry bushes. The Raspberry Blossom Honey collected from Washington State hives has subtle tastes of the fruit. Like wine, the honey flavors reflect the terroir of the region, says Mosholder. Add them to glazes, dressings and marinades; a drizzle heightens the flavor of anything. Available at Boston General Store, 305 Harvard St., Brookline, 617-232-0103 and 626 High St., Dedham, 781-326-7560; Curds & Co., 288 Washington St., Brookline, 617-879-0565; On Centre, 676 Centre St., Jamaica Plain, 617-522-2255; Kind Goods, 85 Main St., Maynard, (no phone), or go to bumbleberryfarms.com.

ANN TRIEGER KURLAND

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Ann Trieger Kurland can be reached at anntrieger@gmail.com.