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LETTERS

The ‘biohazard’ of discarded needles

Governor Charlie Baker speaks during a press conference at the State House regarding the state's response to COVID-19 on Oct. 22.
Governor Charlie Baker speaks during a press conference at the State House regarding the state's response to COVID-19 on Oct. 22.Sam Doran/Pool

Governor should be pushing for safe consumption sites, not resisting them

Re “Charlie Baker’s wife doesn’t want to find needles outside her home — neither does anyone else” by Joan Vennochi (Opinion, Oct. 22): Lauren Baker doesn’t “want to walk into a biohazard,” so she takes action and seeks a court order. Those facing challenges that people like Mrs. Baker have only read about also want to reduce their biohazard exposure. However, Charlie Baker, in his capacity as governor, has stubbornly refused to take the one practical, scientifically proven step that would all but guarantee that result: the creation of safe consumption sites.

More than 100 of these street-tested sites in 10 countries are living proof that public hazards such as discarded needles can be reduced significantly, while minimizing unnecessary deaths and disease. Governor Baker knows better. We deserve better.

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Bill Fried

Somerville


Boston should not be our area’s de facto substance use treatment zone

Until people with substance use disorder who come from towns and cities around Boston are able to access treatment in their own communities, they will continue to come to my city, congregate unsafely, and leave needles at the corner of Massachusetts Avenue and Melnea Cass Boulevard as well as surrounding neighborhoods where people live. To my suburban neighbors, I would suggest, instead of charity or indignation, that you take care of your own and make treatment more widely available.

Catherine Walker

Dorchester