fb-pixel Skip to main content
Togu Knives.
Togu Knives.Handout

Since the pandemic hit and we’re spending more time cooking, it may be evident that we’ve neglected to maintain our most essential kitchen tools — knives. Even if you own a manual or electric sharpener, it takes time and practice to produce a razor-sharp edge. Here’s where Cyrus Elias, 30, comes in. He runs Togu Knives, a membership service for the home cook that gets two sharpened knives sent to you in the mail and swaps them every eight weeks with a new pair so you always have sharp knives (the cost is $6 a week). You send the dull ones off in the same slim box the new knives arrived in and drop the package in a mailbox (return label and tape for sealing are included). The set includes a high-quality, 7-inch blade santoku (a Japanese knife whose edge is slightly curved, and a bit shorter and lighter than a European chef’s knife) and a paring knife with a 4-inch blade. In his Cambridge workshop, Elias sharpens and polishes each by hand in stages with ceramic whetstones. He initially trained to sharpen woodworking tools and also cooked for a stint at the famed restaurant Chez Panisse in Berkeley, Calif. He says his business is a bridge between his skill in sharpening steels and cooking experience at the restaurant, where they used primarily Japanese knives. “I saw how important it is to have sharp knives and the impact on how food tastes and how it feels in your mouth,” Elias says. For membership information, go to toguknives.com.

ANN TRIEGER KURLAND

Advertisement





Ann Trieger Kurland can be reached at anntrieger@gmail.com.