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LETTERS

Playing Trump’s seemingly endless endgame

A Marine stands guard outside the West Wing doors, signifying that President Trump is in the Oval Office, on Nov. 17.
A Marine stands guard outside the West Wing doors, signifying that President Trump is in the Oval Office, on Nov. 17.Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post

Actually, Mr. Bolton, maybe some Republican voters are that stupid

The Nov. 16 Globe quotes John Bolton from ABC’s “This Week”: “I think it’s important for the Republican Party to explain to our voters — who are not as stupid as the Democrats think — that, in fact, Trump has lost the election” (”More Republicans urge Trump to aid transition,” Page A6). If, in fact, the Republicans are not that stupid, why is it necessary for the Republican Party to explain to them something that every Democrat already knows?

Maybe the GOP, while doing some explaining, might also explain why face masks and social distancing can keep them from spreading and contracting COVID-19 — an equally important lesson when, according to one report, more than 30,000 supporters of Donald Trump have been infected with the coronavirus and more than 700 have died as a result of Trump rallies where masks and distancing were discouraged.

Joseph H. Crowley

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Cranston, R.I.


On the transfer of power, there ought to be a law

Re “Shut out by Trump, Biden team losing time to coordinate shot distribution” (Page A1, Nov. 18): For more than 200 years, the United States has enjoyed a peaceful transfer of power between the presidents. There is no law that says that that has to happen, but all those before Donald Trump have graciously stepped aside for the good of the country.

Until now.

Since there is no law that mandates that Trump concede the election, he hasn’t. Why? Because he doesn’t want to, and the Republican-controlled Senate is too afraid of him to show him the door.

So now Congress will need to pass a law that mandates a peaceful transfer of power. Another irony from the Republican Party that believes in less regulation. We shouldn’t need a transfer-of-power law any more than we should need antipollution laws, but sadly we do.

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Richard Hackel

Cambridge