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SEASONAL RECIPES

Recipe: If you love to make pies, you’ll enjoy rolling and filling this flaky dough for apple hand pies

Apple Hand Pies.
Apple Hand Pies.Karoline Boehm Goodnick

Makes 9

A hand pie is just as it sounds: a pie meant to be eaten out of hand. In England, it's called pasty, and a specialty of Cornwall, where it's filled with beef and potatoes. These half-moon shaped delights are perfect for a small gathering of folks who appreciate a good pastry-to-filling ratio. In this sweet version, apples are ideal because they're firm and easy to contain. If you love to bake pies, you'll enjoy rolling out this dough, stamping out rounds, and making these individual cuties. There are only two tricks to making perfect hand pies with this flaky dough. Chill the dough, which is made in a food processor, after it is mixed and again after the hand pies are filled. And resist the urge to overfill them. Too much filling will prevent the edges from sealing. Begin by cooking the apples for a few minutes on the stovetop. This way, some of the natural juices in the fruits cook off, and what remains is a dense and flavorful filling that doesn’t shrink in the oven. The filled half-moons will hold up if made a day or two in advance, and after baking, leftovers will make a great breakfast. Cold pie for breakfast is the best New England tradition of all.

PASTRY

2cups flour
Pinch of salt
½teaspoon baking powder
1tablespoon granulated sugar
10tablespoons cold butter, cut up
teaspoons distilled white vinegar or cider vinegar
¼cup ice water, or more if needed
Extra flour (for sprinkling)

1. In a food processor, combine the flour, salt, baking powder, and granulated sugar. Pulse to blend them. Add the butter and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs and holds together when squeezed in your hands.

2. Add the vinegar and ice water. Pulse a few times until the mixture forms large clumps. It shouldn't come together to form a ball. Turn out onto a lightly floured counter. Knead lightly just until the dough comes together. Shape into a flat disk. Wrap in foil and refrigerate for 20 minutes.

FILLING

3 cooking apples (Cortland, Golden Delicious, Rome Beauty, Baldwin, Mutsu, Jonagold)
2tablespoons butter
¼cup granulated sugar
½teaspoon ground cinnamon
Pinch of ground nutmeg
1 egg, lightly beaten (for the glaze)
Coarse sugar, such as sanding, demerara, or turbinado (for sprinkling)

1. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. Peel the apples, core them, and cut into small dice (you should have about 3 1/2 cups).

3. In a skillet over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the apples, granulated sugar, cinnamon. and nutmeg. Cook, stirring often, for 4 to 5 minutes, or until apples begin to soften and shrink. Cool to room temperature.

4. On a lightly floured counter, roll the dough until it is 1/8 -inch thick. Using a 5-inch saucer or a 5-inch cardboard circle as a template, cut as many rounds from the dough as possible. Re-roll the scraps and cut more rounds until all the dough has been used. You should have about 9.

5. Place a spoonful of cooked apples in the center of each round. With a pastry brush, gently brush a small amount of beaten egg on half the edge of the rounds. Fold the pastries in half, pressing them closed with your fingers. Press the tines of a fork onto the outer edges to seal them. With a sharp knife, make 3 small slits in the top of each one. Transfer them to the baking sheet.

6. Refrigerate the hand pies for 15 minutes. Set the oven at 400 degrees.

7. Brush the tops of the dough with egg glaze and sprinkle with coarse sugar. Bake for 30 minutes, or until the pastry is golden brown and the filling starts to bubble out of the vents. Cool for at least 30 minutes before serving.

Karoline Boehm Goodnick

Makes 9

A hand pie is just as it sounds: a pie meant to be eaten out of hand. In England, it's called pasty, and a specialty of Cornwall, where it's filled with beef and potatoes. These half-moon shaped delights are perfect for a small gathering of folks who appreciate a good pastry-to-filling ratio. In this sweet version, apples are ideal because they're firm and easy to contain. If you love to bake pies, you'll enjoy rolling out this dough, stamping out rounds, and making these individual cuties. There are only two tricks to making perfect hand pies with this flaky dough. Chill the dough, which is made in a food processor, after it is mixed and again after the hand pies are filled. And resist the urge to overfill them. Too much filling will prevent the edges from sealing. Begin by cooking the apples for a few minutes on the stovetop. This way, some of the natural juices in the fruits cook off, and what remains is a dense and flavorful filling that doesn’t shrink in the oven. The filled half-moons will hold up if made a day or two in advance, and after baking, leftovers will make a great breakfast. Cold pie for breakfast is the best New England tradition of all.

PASTRY

2cups flour
Pinch of salt
½teaspoon baking powder
1tablespoon granulated sugar
10tablespoons cold butter, cut up
teaspoons distilled white vinegar or cider vinegar
¼cup ice water, or more if needed
Extra flour (for sprinkling)

1. In a food processor, combine the flour, salt, baking powder, and granulated sugar. Pulse to blend them. Add the butter and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs and holds together when squeezed in your hands.

2. Add the vinegar and ice water. Pulse a few times until the mixture forms large clumps. It shouldn't come together to form a ball. Turn out onto a lightly floured counter. Knead lightly just until the dough comes together. Shape into a flat disk. Wrap in foil and refrigerate for 20 minutes.

FILLING

3 cooking apples (Cortland, Golden Delicious, Rome Beauty, Baldwin, Mutsu, Jonagold)
2tablespoons butter
¼cup granulated sugar
½teaspoon ground cinnamon
Pinch of ground nutmeg
1 egg, lightly beaten (for the glaze)
Coarse sugar, such as sanding, demerara, or turbinado (for sprinkling)

1. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. Peel the apples, core them, and cut into small dice (you should have about 3 1/2 cups).

3. In a skillet over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the apples, granulated sugar, cinnamon. and nutmeg. Cook, stirring often, for 4 to 5 minutes, or until apples begin to soften and shrink. Cool to room temperature.

4. On a lightly floured counter, roll the dough until it is 1/8 -inch thick. Using a 5-inch saucer or a 5-inch cardboard circle as a template, cut as many rounds from the dough as possible. Re-roll the scraps and cut more rounds until all the dough has been used. You should have about 9.

5. Place a spoonful of cooked apples in the center of each round. With a pastry brush, gently brush a small amount of beaten egg on half the edge of the rounds. Fold the pastries in half, pressing them closed with your fingers. Press the tines of a fork onto the outer edges to seal them. With a sharp knife, make 3 small slits in the top of each one. Transfer them to the baking sheet.

6. Refrigerate the hand pies for 15 minutes. Set the oven at 400 degrees.

7. Brush the tops of the dough with egg glaze and sprinkle with coarse sugar. Bake for 30 minutes, or until the pastry is golden brown and the filling starts to bubble out of the vents. Cool for at least 30 minutes before serving.Karoline Boehm Goodnick