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‘Sweet Caroline’ global singalong is the video Red Sox fans (and Neil Diamond buffs) need now

Hundreds of people around the globe sent Neil Diamond videos of themselves singing along to "Sweet Caroline." The compilation was posted to YouTube.
Hundreds of people around the globe sent Neil Diamond videos of themselves singing along to "Sweet Caroline." The compilation was posted to YouTube.Neil Diamond (Custom credit)

Miss singing “Sweet Caroline” in a boisterous crowd of Red Sox fans? In bars? During parades? Turns out lots of people around the world do, too.

Singer-songwriter Neil Diamond put out a call for video submissions from families, friends, and strangers singing along to his beloved track. People spanning the globe responded in droves, and several responses were compiled into a four-minute-long YouTube video released Monday.

“2020 has been a tough year for everyone, so we wanted to bring people together the best way we know how: through music,” a message before the video reads.

The video features groups of close friends pre-pandemic, children at pianos, generations of grandmothers and granddaughters, elderly couples dancing, and folks alone at their desks and dining tables. Even Santa makes an appearance.

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It’s something of a testament to resilience in a particularly difficult year and a ray of hope for a pandemic-free future. At least, that’s what folks in the comments thought.

“Gives me chills to see so many people of different ages come together to sing an iconic song by an iconic writer/singer!,” one person wrote. “A finer tribute couldn’t be done to another!”

“I was smiling the biggest smile from beginning to end with happy tears glistening in my eyes,” wrote another.

Here in Boston, the singalong means a little bit more after months without fan-filled Red Sox games. Plus, it’s not the first time Diamond’s classic has shone in the spotlight this year. In March, a COVID-themed version swept the streets of Boston as well.

““Hands, not touching hands,” resident Mike DiCarlo sang from his window. “Not reaching out. Not touching me. Not touching yoooooooouuuuuu.”

Diti Kohli can be reached at diti.kohli@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter at @ditikohli_.