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We look back on the sports figures we lost this past year.

David Stern

Jan. 1 at age 77. The NBA’s longest-serving commissioner (30 years) who was instrumental in making it a global, multibillion-dollar enterprise.

David Stern served as NBA commissioner from 1984-2014, overseeing tremendous growth in the league's popularity.
David Stern served as NBA commissioner from 1984-2014, overseeing tremendous growth in the league's popularity.Tony Gutierrez/Associated Press

Don Larsen

Jan. 1 at age 90. Yankees righthander who immortalized himself in 1956 when he hurled the only no-hitter — a perfect game at that — in World Series history.

Don Larsen needed just 97 pitches and struck out seven in his gem against the Brooklyn Dodgers in Game 5 of the 1956 World Series.
Don Larsen needed just 97 pitches and struck out seven in his gem against the Brooklyn Dodgers in Game 5 of the 1956 World Series.AP

Les Josephson

Jan. 1 at age 77. Pro Bowl running back for the Los Angeles Rams (1964-74).

Doug Hart

Jan. 1 at age 80. Defensive back on the champion Green Bay Packers teams of the 1960s.

Sam Wyche

Jan. 2 at age 74. Innovative coach who led the Bengals to the Super Bowl in 1988 and went 84-107 overall in a 12-year coaching career with Cincinnati and Tampa Bay.

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George Nicolau

Jan. 2 at age 94. Baseball arbitrator who ruled against the owners in collusion cases in 1986 and 1987.

Houston Hogg

Jan. 3 at age 71. One of four African-American football players at Kentucky who helped break the Southeastern Conference color line in the late 1960s.

George Perles

Jan. 7 at age 85. Coach who guided Michigan State to a Rose Bowl victory in 1988 and was an assistant on the powerhouse Steelers teams that won four Super Bowls in the 1970s.

Hal Smith

Jan. 9 at age 89. Catcher whose three-run homer in the eighth inning of Game 7 helped the Pirates pull off a stunning upset of the Yankees in the 1960 World Series.

Pete Dye

Jan. 9 at age 94. Famed golf course architect whose most iconic creation is the island green on the 17th hole at TPC Sawgrass.

Pete Dye's signature hole is the 17th at TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., with its intimidating island green
Pete Dye's signature hole is the 17th at TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., with its intimidating island greenSam Greenwood

Ed Sprague

Jan. 10 at age 74. Pitcher for four teams (A’s, Reds, Cardinals, Brewers) in an eight-year major league career.

Fausto Segura

Jan. 12 at age 23. Washington Nationals pitching prospect.

Grace Rett

Jan. 15 at age 20. Holy Cross rower known for her dedication to the sport and her leadership among teammates.

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Morgan Wootten

Jan. 21 at age 88. Basketball Hall of Fame coach who went 1,274-192 at DeMatha High School from 1956-2002, mentoring several future NBA stars.

Gene Corrigan

Jan. 25 at age 91. Former NCAA president, ACC commissioner, and athletic director at Notre Dame and Virginia.

Kobe Bryant

Jan. 26 at age 41. All-time NBA great who played on five championship teams with the Lakers, won two scoring titles and the 2008 MVP, and made 18 All-Star teams.

Kobe Bryant (right) is the Lakers' franchise leader in games, points, and 3-pointers.
Kobe Bryant (right) is the Lakers' franchise leader in games, points, and 3-pointers.CHIN, BARRY GLOBE STAFF PHOTO

John Altobelli

Jan. 26 at age 56. Baseball coach at Orange Coast College (Calif.) and father of Red Sox scout J.J. Altobelli.

Chris Doleman

Jan. 28 at age 58. Hall of Famer who was one of the most feared pass rushers (150½ sacks) in a 15-year NFL career with the Vikings, Falcons, and 49ers.

Larry Eisenhauer

Jan. 29 at age 79. Defensive lineman who starred at Boston College before becoming an All-Pro for the Boston Patriots in the 1960s.

Larry Eisenhauer played for the Patriots from 1961-69.
Larry Eisenhauer played for the Patriots from 1961-69.edison farrand

John Andretti

Jan. 30 at age 56. Nephew of racing great Mario Andretti who won twice on the NASCAR circuit and also raced IndyCars.

Terry Fair

Jan. 30 at age 59. Star forward on Georgia’s only Final Four men’s basketball team, in 1983.

Foster Cass

Jan. 31 at age 79. Boys’ soccer coach at Duxbury who guided his teams to nine state titles between 1978 and 1999 and a national-record 72 straight wins from 1981-85.

Willie Wood

Feb. 3 at age 83. Hall of Fame defensive back who played on five NFL champion Green Bay Packers teams in the 1960s.

Willie Wood (left) pursues Tommy Wadkins of the Lions in a 1967 game.
Willie Wood (left) pursues Tommy Wadkins of the Lions in a 1967 game.AP/Associated Press

Roger Kahn

Feb. 6 at age 92. Author of the 1972 baseball classic “The Boys of Summer,” a nostalgic meditation on the Brooklyn Dodgers of the 1950s.

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Barry Brown

Feb. 6 at age 76. Tight end who played two seasons for the Patriots (1969-70).

Brian Glennie

Feb. 7 at age 73. Hard-hitting defenseman for the Toronto Maple Leafs in the 1970s.

Angel Echevarria

Feb. 7 at age 48. Outfielder for four teams, mostly the Colorado Rockies, in a seven-year career (1996-2002).

Tony Fernandez

Feb. 16 at age 57. Shortstop who played 17 years in the majors with seven teams, mostly the Blue Jays, and made five All-Star teams.

Tony Fernandez makes a throws from the turf while playing third base for the Blue Jays.
Tony Fernandez makes a throws from the turf while playing third base for the Blue Jays.Frank Gunn/Associated Press

Mickey Wright

Feb. 17 at age 85. Hall of Fame golfer who won 82 LPGA tournaments — second all time — including 13 majors.

Mickey Wright hits an approach shot in a 1967 tournament in Toronto.
Mickey Wright hits an approach shot in a 1967 tournament in Toronto.Associated Press

Pete Babando

Feb. 19 at age 94. Left winger who scored the Stanley Cup-winning goal for the Red Wings in the second overtime of Game 7 of the 1950 finals, and led the Bruins with 23 goals in 1947-48.

Jeanne Evert

Feb. 20 at age 62. Former world-ranked tennis player and younger sister of Chris Evert.

Phil Maloney

Feb. 21 at age 92. Center who began his brief NHL career with a sparkling 15-31—46 rookie campaign for the 1949-50 Bruins and later coached the Vancouver Canucks for 3½ seasons.

Ray York

Feb. 23 at age 86. First jockey to ride in seven decades, and winner of the 1954 Kentucky Derby aboard Determine.

Dick Tamburo

Feb. 24 at age 90. All-American center on two national champion football teams at Michigan State who later was AD at Texas Tech, Arizona State, and Missouri.

Johnny Antonelli

Feb. 28 at age 89. Lefthander who went 21-7 for the 1954 World Series champion New York Giants and also played two-plus seasons for the Boston Braves.

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Eva Szekely

Feb. 29 at age 92. Hungarian Holocaust survivor who went on to become an Olympic gold medalist in swimming (200m breaststroke) at the 1952 Games.

Don Pavletich

March 5 at age 81. Catcher who played seven years with the Cincinnati Reds before ending his career with two abbreviated seasons with the Red Sox (1970-71).

Henri Richard

March 7 at age 84. Hall of Fame center who played on a record 11 Stanley Cup champion teams with the Montreal Canadiens.

Henri Richard (center) receives the Stanley Cup from NHL president Clarence Campbell (left) in 1973.
Henri Richard (center) receives the Stanley Cup from NHL president Clarence Campbell (left) in 1973.fhj/Associated Press

War Emblem

March 11 at age 21. Winner of the 2002 Kentucky Derby and Preakness.

Del Shofner

March 11 at age 85. All-Pro receiver for the Rams and Giants in the late 1950s and early ’60s.

Giants receiver Del Shofner is targeted for a pass during a 1961 game agains the Steelers.
Giants receiver Del Shofner is targeted for a pass during a 1961 game agains the Steelers.Associated Press

Ted Cox

March 11 at age 65. Journeyman infielder who began his career in 1977 with the Red Sox by going 6 for 6, still a major league record.

Dana Zatopkova

March 13 at age 97. Gold medalist in the javelin at the 1952 Olympics and wife of running great Emil Zatopek.

Roger Mayweather

March 17 at age 58. World champion boxer at 130 and 140 pounds who also trained his nephew, Floyd Mayweather Jr.

Bill McPherson

March 17 at age 88. Assistant coach on the staff of five Super Bowl winners with the 49ers.

Borislav Stankovic

March 20 at age 94. Secretary general of the International Basketball Federation from 1976-2002 credited with bringing NBA players to the Olympics.

Mike Stratton

March 25 at age 78. All-Pro linebacker on two Buffalo Bills AFL champion teams remembered for a thunderous hit in the 1964 title game that broke the ribs of the Chargers’ Keith Lincoln.

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Bill Bartholomay

March 25 at age 91. Braves owner who moved the team from Milwaukee to Atlanta in 1966, establishing the first major league baseball franchise in the South.

Terry Tausch

March 25 at age 61. All-American offensive lineman at Texas who played eight years in the NFL, winning a Super Bowl with the 49ers in the 1989 season.

Curly Neal

March 26 at age 77. Dribbling wizard who entertained millions for more than 20 years (1963-85) in more than 6,000 games with the Harlem Globetrotters.

Curly Neal was a crowd-pleasing magician with the basketball.
Curly Neal was a crowd-pleasing magician with the basketball.Ross D. Franklin/Associated Press

Jimmy Wynn

March 26 at age 78. Slugging outfielder for the Houston Astros in the 1960s and ’70s known as the Toy Cannon for his compact but powerful build.

Jimmy Wynn gets a jubilant welcome from his Astros teammates after homering in a 1972 game.
Jimmy Wynn gets a jubilant welcome from his Astros teammates after homering in a 1972 game.Blair Pittman/Houston Chronicle via AP

Les Hunter

March 27 at age 77. Star center on Loyola’s 1963 NCAA men’s champion team that helped break down racial barriers in college basketball.

Ed Farmer

April 1 at age 70. Reliever for eight teams in an 11-year career, including a 30-save All-Star campaign with the White Sox in 1980.

Timmy Brown

April 3 at age 82. Pro Bowl running back/kick returner on the 1960 Philadelphia Eagles NFL champion team.

Tom Dempsey

April 4 at age 73. Saints kicker whose 63-yard field goal in 1970 stood as an NFL record for 43 years and was accomplished despite a birth defect that left him with no toes on his foot.

Tom Dempsey's record-breaking kick in 1970 gave the Saints a last-second victory over the Lions.
Tom Dempsey's record-breaking kick in 1970 gave the Saints a last-second victory over the Lions. AP

Harland Svare

April 4 at age 89. Linebacker on the 1956 New York Giants NFL champion team who later coached the Los Angeles Rams and San Diego Chargers.

Bob Hermann

April 5 at age 97. US Soccer Hall of Famer as an executive whose namesake trophy goes to the top college player in the country.

Bobby Mitchell

April 5 at age 84. Hall of Fame receiver for Cleveland and Washington who in 1962 became the first African-American player for the Redskins, the last NFL team to integrate.

When Bobby Mitchell (top) retired in 1968, he had the second-most all-purpose yards in NFL history.
When Bobby Mitchell (top) retired in 1968, he had the second-most all-purpose yards in NFL history.Fred Waters/Associated Press

Al Kaline

April 6 at age 85. Hall of Fame right fielder and beloved Detroit Tigers icon who was the youngest player to win a batting title (.340 at age 20 in 1955) and a mainstay on the 1968 World Series champions.

Al Kaline (left), who was known as "Mr. Tiger," is shown in 1969 with fellow Hall of Famer Ted Williams, then the Senators manager.
Al Kaline (left), who was known as "Mr. Tiger," is shown in 1969 with fellow Hall of Famer Ted Williams, then the Senators manager.Associated Press

Pat Stapleton

April 9 at age 79. All-Star defenseman who started his career with the Bruins (1961-63) before becoming a fixture on the Chicago Black Hawks blue line for eight years.

Pat Stapleton (left) battles Buffalo's Gilbert Perreault for the puck during a 1971 game.
Pat Stapleton (left) battles Buffalo's Gilbert Perreault for the puck during a 1971 game.Fred Jewell/Associated Press

Pete Retzlaff

April 10 at age 88. All-Pro halfback/tight end who played 11 years for the Philadelphia Eagles, including their 1960 NFL championship season.

Tom Webster

April 10 at age 71. Right wing who started his career with the Bruins (1968-70) but had his most success with the WHA’s New England Whalers (1972-78) and later coached the Rangers and Kings.

Colby Cave

April 11 at age 25. Center for two seasons with the Bruins (2017-19) and two more with the Edmonton Oilers.

Colby Cave went 1-4—5 in 23 games with the Bruins.
Colby Cave went 1-4—5 in 23 games with the Bruins.Claus Andersen

Jim Frey

April 12 at age 88. Manager who led the Kansas City Royals to the 1980 American League pennant and was National League Manager of the Year with the Chicago Cubs in 1984.

Stirling Moss

April 12 at age 90. English race driver who won 16 Formula One races.

Doug Sanders

April 12 at age 86. Winner of 20 PGA events, and runner-up in four majors, who was known for his flamboyant fashion on the golf course.

Glenn Beckert

April 12 at age 79. Second baseman who made four All-Star teams in nine seasons (1965-73) with the Chicago Cubs.

Tarvaris Jackson

April 12 at age 36. Quarterback for the Minnesota Vikings and Seattle Seahawks.

Hank Steinbrenner

April 14 at age 63. New York Yankees co-owner.

Bill Tighe

April 15 at age 95. Lexington High School football coach for 36 years.

Willie Davis

April 15 at age 85. Hall of Fame defensive lineman who played on five NFL champions with the powerhouse Green Bay Packers of the 1960s.

Willie Davis was a first-team All-Pro five times.
Willie Davis was a first-team All-Pro five times.AP

Damaso Garcia

April 15 at age 63. All-Star second baseman for the Toronto Blue Jays in the 1980s.

Bobby Winkles

April 17 at age 90. Baseball coach who won three national championships at Arizona State and later managed the California Angels and Oakland Athletics.

Steve Dalkowski

April 19 at age 80. Fireballing but wildly erratic minor league hurler (with a fastball supposedly well over 100 m.p.h.) who was the inspiration for the Nuke LaLoosh character in “Bull Durham.”

Bob Oliver

April 19 at age 77. First baseman/outfielder who was an original Kansas City Royal and had the first 6-for-6 game in franchise history.

Mike Curtis

April 20 at age 77. Fierce middle linebacker for the Baltimore Colts whose last-minute interception set up the winning field goal in Super Bowl V against Dallas.

Mike Curtis picks off a Craig Morton pass late in Super Bowl V.
Mike Curtis picks off a Craig Morton pass late in Super Bowl V.Associated Press

Milt Sunde

April 21 at age 78. Guard who played in Super Bowls IV and IX for the Minnesota Vikings.

Jim Conacher

April 21 at age 98. Center for the Red Wings, Black Hawks, and Rangers in the 1940s and ’50s who at the time of his death was believed to be the oldest living former NHL player.

Marino Casem

April 25 at age 85. College Football Hall of Fame coach who went 159-93-8 at Alcorn State, with four Black College National Championships.

Mike Carey

April 26 at age 72. Longtime Boston Herald sportswriter.

Mark McNamara

April 27 at age 60. Star center at Cal who went on to play eight seasons with five teams in the NBA.

Marty Smith

April 27 at age 63. AMA Motocross Hall of Famer and one of the sport’s earliest icons.

Dick Lucas

April 29 at age 86. Tight end on the Philadelphia Eagles 1960 NFL champions who also played for Boston College.

Matt Keough

May 1 at age 64. Pitcher for five teams, mostly the Oakland Athletics, in a nine-year major league career.

Ryan Wetnight

May 1 at age 49. Chicago Bears tight end (1993-99).

Don Shula

May 4 at age 90. Winningest coach in NFL history, two-time Super Bowl champion, and author of the perfect 17-0-0 season with the 1972 Miami Dolphins.

Don Shula is carried off by his players after the Dolphins completed their perfect season with a win over Washington in Super Bowl VII.
Don Shula is carried off by his players after the Dolphins completed their perfect season with a win over Washington in Super Bowl VII.Anonymous/Associated Press

Mary Pratt

May 6 at age 101. Pitcher for the Rockford Peaches and Kenosha Comets in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League from 1943-47.

Mary Pratt was an original Peach and was believed to be the last surviving member of the team.
Mary Pratt was an original Peach and was believed to be the last surviving member of the team.KREITER, Suzanne GLOBE STAFF/file

John McCarthy

May 9 at age 86. Guard on the 1964 Celtics NBA champions who in 1960 with the St. Louis Hawks became the first player to record a triple-double in his first career playoff game.

Bob Watson

May 14 at age 74. All-Star slugger for the Astros who also played one year (1979) for the Red Sox and later was Yankees general manager and an MLB vice president.

Bob Watson slides home against catcher Joe Ferguson in a 1978 Astros-Dodgers game.
Bob Watson slides home against catcher Joe Ferguson in a 1978 Astros-Dodgers game.AP

Pepper Rodgers

May 14 at age 88. Quarterback on Georgia Tech’s undefeated 1952 team and later the Yellow Jackets coach (1974-79).

Phyllis George

May 14 at age 70. Former Miss America who became a pioneering female sportscaster on CBS.

Phyllis George joined the panel on CBS's “The NFL Today” in 1975.
Phyllis George joined the panel on CBS's “The NFL Today” in 1975.Suzanne Vlamis/Associated Press

Michael McCaskey

May 16 at age 76. President/CEO of the Chicago Bears from 1983-2011.

Rodger Bird

May 16 at age 76. Oakland Raiders defensive back who led the AFL in punt-return yardage in 1966 and ’67.

Ben Williams

May 18 at age 65. Buffalo Bills defensive end (1976-85) and the first African-American to play football at Mississippi.

Jerry Sloan

May 22 at age 78. Hall of Fame coach who won more than a thousand games in 23 years with the Utah Jazz, taking them to the NBA Finals in 1997 and ’98.

Before his coaching days, Jerry Sloan was a two-time All-Star guard with the Chicago Bulls.
Before his coaching days, Jerry Sloan was a two-time All-Star guard with the Chicago Bulls.Tony Gutierrez/Associated Press

Ashley Cooper

May 22 at age 83. Australian tennis champion who won four Grand Slam singles titles, including three in 1958.

Eddie Sutton

May 23 at age 84. Hall of Fame college basketball coach who made three trips to the Final Four (Arkansas, Oklahoma State twice) and was the first to take four colleges to the NCAA Tournament.

Biff Pocoroba

May 24 at age 66. Catcher for the Atlanta Braves (1975-84) who made the NL All-Star team in 1978.

Roy Steele

May 29 at age 87. Oakland A’s public-address announcer for 38 seasons beginning in 1968, known as “The Voice of God.”

Roosevelt Taylor

May 29 at age 82. All-Pro safety on the Chicago Bears 1963 NFL champions who also played in Super Bowl VII for the Washington Redskins.

Curtis Cokes

May 29 at age 82. International Boxing Hall of Famer who was welterweight champion from 1966-69.

Bobby Joe Morrow

May 30 at age 84. Sprinter who won three gold medals in the 1956 Melbourne Olympics (100, 200, and 400 relay) and the Sullivan Award in 1957.

Bobby Joe Morrow (left) hits the finish line to give the US the gold in the 4 x 100 meter relay at the Melbourne Olympics in 1956.
Bobby Joe Morrow (left) hits the finish line to give the US the gold in the 4 x 100 meter relay at the Melbourne Olympics in 1956.Associated Press

Pat Dye

June 1 at age 80. Football coach who turned Auburn into a Southeastern Conference power in the 1980s and overall went 153-62-5 in 17 years with the Tigers, Wyoming, and East Carolina.

Bryan Lyons

June 1 at age 50. Billerica marathoner who pushed Rick Hoyt in the Boston Marathon since 2015.

Wes Unseld

June 2 at age 74. Hall of Fame center who led the Washington Bullets to their only NBA title (1977-78) and was one of only two players to be Rookie of the Year and MVP in the same season (1968-69).

Wes Unseld (left) blocks a shot by Seattle's Paul Silas during a 1979 game.
Wes Unseld (left) blocks a shot by Seattle's Paul Silas during a 1979 game. Smith/Associated Press

Arrogate

June 2 at age 7. Winner of the 2016 Breeders’ Cup Classic and the career leader in earnings among North American horses with more than $17 million.

Johnny Majors

June 3 at age 85. Star tailback at Tennessee (1954-56) who went 185-137-10 as a coach at three schools, leading Pittsburgh to a national championship in 1976.

Pete Rademacher

June 4 at age 91. Boxing gold medalist at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics who fought Floyd Patterson for the heavyweight title in his pro debut.

Kurt Thomas

June 5 at age 64. The first US male gymnast to win a world title (floor exercise, 1978) and the 1979 Sullivan Award winner as the nation’s top amateur athlete.

Kurt Thomas competed in the 1976 Olympics but missed the Games in 1980 when the US boycotted.
Kurt Thomas competed in the 1976 Olympics but missed the Games in 1980 when the US boycotted.Micheal Snyder/Associated Press

Reche Caldwell

June 6 at age 41. Receiver whose six-year NFL career included one season with the Patriots (2006), in which he led the team with 61 catches.

Reche Caldwell hauls in a pass during a playoff win over the Chargers in January 2007.
Reche Caldwell hauls in a pass during a playoff win over the Chargers in January 2007.Davis, Jim Globe Staff

John Zook

June 6 at age 72. All-Pro defensive lineman for the Falcons and Cardinals (1969-79).

Ken Riley

June 7 at age 72. All-Pro cornerback for the Bengals (1969-83) whose 65 interceptions are tied for fifth all-time.

Paul Rochester

June 7 at age 81. Defensive lineman on the New York Jets Super Bowl III champions.

Harry Glickman

June 10 at age 96. Founder of the Portland Trail Blazers and general manager when they won the NBA title in 1977.

Claudell Washington

June 10 at age 65. Well-traveled outfielder who played with seven teams in a 17-year career, winning a World Series with the Oakland A’s in 1974 and twice being named an All-Star.

Mike McCormick

June 13 at age 81. Pitcher for 16 years in the majors (1956-71) who won the National League Cy Young Award with the San Francisco Giants in 1967.

Jerry Sturm

June 17 at age 83. Denver Broncos center/guard who famously turned down a bribe to throw games by deliberately botching snaps to the quarterback or holder.

Jim Kiick

June 20 at age 73. Running back on the Dolphins’ back-to-back Super Bowl champions in the 1970s, including the perfect 1972 team that went 17-0-0.

Jim Kiick scores a touchdown in the 1972 AFC Championship game against the Steelers.
Jim Kiick scores a touchdown in the 1972 AFC Championship game against the Steelers.Associated Press

Ken Snow

June 21 at age 50. Indiana University soccer star who twice won the Hermann Trophy as the national Player of the Year.

Dick Buerkle

June 22 at age 72. Two-time US Olympian in the 5,000 meters who held the world record for the indoor mile for a year after running 3:54.93 in 1978.

Eddie Kasko

June 24 at age 88. Red Sox manager from 1970-73 and All-Star shortstop for the National League champion Cincinnati Reds in 1961.

Eddie Kasko went 345-295 in his four years at the Red Sox helm.
Eddie Kasko went 345-295 in his four years at the Red Sox helm.Harry Harris/Associated Press

Joe Bugel

June 28 at age 80. Offensive line coach of “The Hogs,” who were instrumental in the Washington Redskins winning three Super Bowls, and later head coach of the Cardinals and Raiders.

Bill Lawrence

June 29 at age 53. Middleboro High School baseball coach whose teams won two state championships.

Bob Reade

July 5 at age 87. College Football Hall of Fame coach who went 146-23-1 at Augustana, winning four consecutive Division 3 national championships.

Mike Ryan

July 7 at age 78. Haverhill native who caught 79 games for the Impossible Dream Red Sox in 1967 as part of a 10-year playing career and was bullpen coach for the champion Phillies in 1980.

After his time with the Red Sox, Mike Ryan played six years with the  Phillies.
After his time with the Red Sox, Mike Ryan played six years with the Phillies.Frank O'Brien/Globe Staff/The Boston Globe

Jack Charlton

July 10 at age 85. English soccer great who played on the country’s 1966 World Cup champions and later coached Ireland to its first major tournaments.

Jack Charlton (right) was Footballer of the Year in 1967.
Jack Charlton (right) was Footballer of the Year in 1967.AP

Frank Bolling

July 11 at age 88. All-Star and Gold Glove second baseman for the Tigers and Braves in a 12-year career (1954-66).

Ken Church

July 13 at age 90. Jockey who rode more than 2,000 winners from 1947-67, including five straight one day at Chicago’s Washington Park.

David Lewis

July 14 at age 65. Linebacker for three teams, mostly the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, in a seven-year NFL career (1977-83).

Rick Reed

July 16 at age 70. Major league umpire from 1979-2009 who worked the 1991 World Series and appeared in the Kevin Costner movie “For Love of the Game.”

Tony Taylor

July 16 at age 84. Second baseman who played 15 of his 19 big league seasons with the Phillies, making the All-Star team for them in 1960.

Carlton Haselrig

July 22 at age 64. Pro Bowl guard for the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 1990s and the only wrestler in NCAA history to win six individual national championships.

Stanley Robinson

July 22 at age 32. Starting forward on the University of Connecticut’s Final Four men’s basketball team in 2009.

Leo Dupere

July 22 at age 79. Northeastern hockey standout whose 67 points (33 goals, 34 assists) in 1962-63 are the second-most in school history.

John Blake

July 23 at age 59. The first Black coach in University of Oklahoma history (football, 1996-98) whose recruiting laid the foundation for the program’s resurgence.

Ben Jipcho

July 24 at age 77. Trailblazing Kenyan distance runner whose role as the “rabbit” helped countryman Kip Keino upset Jim Ryun in the 1,500 meters at the 1968 Olympics.

Bob Bahre

July 24 at age 93. Founder of New Hampshire Motor Speedway and a pioneer for motorsports in New England.

The track Bob Bahre built in Loudon, N.H., has hosted NASCAR races since 1992.
The track Bob Bahre built in Loudon, N.H., has hosted NASCAR races since 1992.Landers, Tom Globe Staff/The Boston Globe - The Boston Gl

Eddie Shack

July 25 at age 83. Colorful left wing who played on four Stanley Cup winners with the Toronto Maple Leafs in the 1960s and also spent two seasons with the Bruins (1967-69).

Maurice Petty

July 25 at age 81. NASCAR Hall of Fame engine builder who helped his brother Richard win seven circuit championships.

Lou Henson

July 25 at age 88. Men’s basketball coach who took Illinois and New Mexico State to Final Fours in a 21-year career that he finished with a 779-412 record.

John McNamara

July 28 at age 88. Manager of the ill-fated 1986 Red Sox and five other major league teams in a 20-year career.

John McNamara (left) with Mets manager Davey Johnson at the 1987 All-Star Game.
John McNamara (left) with Mets manager Davey Johnson at the 1987 All-Star Game.Paul Sakuma/Associated Press

Lou Schwechheimer

July 29 at age 62. Former Pawtucket Red Sox general manager who spent 37 years with the franchise in various roles and was International League Executive of the Year in 1987 and 1992.

Mike Gillespie

July 29 at age 80. One of only two men to play on and coach a College World Series championship baseball team (1961 and 1998 with Southern Cal).

Bert Thiel

July 31 at age 94. Pitcher who worked in four games in 1952 and at the time of his death was one of two remaining members of the Boston Braves.

Rickey Dixon

Aug. 1 at age 53. College Football Hall of Fame defensive back who holds the Oklahoma school record for interceptions in a season with nine.

Robert Ryland

Aug. 2 at age 100. The first Black tennis pro (1959) and later a coach to Arthur Ashe and the Williams sisters.

Horace Clarke

Aug. 5 at age 81. Durable second baseman who was the Yankees’ starter for seven straight seasons (1967-73) in a 10-year career.

Carroll Hardy

Aug. 9 at age 87. Red Sox outfielder who was the only man to pinch-hit for Ted Williams (and later Carl Yastrzemski) and who also was a football star at Colorado and played in the NFL.

Mel Stute

Aug. 12 at age 93. Trainer of 1986 Preakness winner Snow Chief.

Howard Mudd

Aug. 12 at age 78. All-Pro guard for the 49ers in the 1960s and offensive line coach for the Colts from 1998-2009.

Bill Yeoman

Aug. 12 at age 92. College Football Hall of Fame coach who compiled a school-record 160 victories at Houston.

Herb Orvis

Aug. 14 at age 73. Defensive lineman for the Detroit Lions and Baltimore Colts (1972-81).

Dick Coury

Aug. 15 at age 91. Head coach of the USFL’s Boston Breakers in 1983 and Patriots offensive coordinator in 1991-92.

Angela Buxton

Aug. 17 at age 85. British tennis player who was the doubles partner of Althea Gibson when Gibson became the first Black player to win a major title at the French Open in 1956.

Dale Hawerchuk

Aug. 18 at age 57. Hockey Hall of Famer who was a Calder Trophy winner and an All-Star with the Winnipeg Jets in the 1980s and is second in Jets/Coyotes franchise history in goals.

Bob Bigelow

Aug. 18 at age 66. Basketball star at Winchester High School and Penn who played four years in the NBA, including four games with the Celtics in 1978.

Pete Wall

Aug. 20 at age 81. Norwood High baseball coach from 1969-2003 who compiled more than 500 wins.

Greg Montgomery

Aug. 23 at age 55. All-Pro punter who played for the Oilers, Lions, and Ravens in the 1980s and ’90s.

Will Hixon

Aug. 26 at age 91. Coach/administrator who guided the Andover High School boys’ basketball team to the 1970 state title and compiled a career record of 464-146.

Lute Olson

Aug. 27 at age 85. Basketball Hall of Fame coach who turned Arizona into a powerhouse, winning 589 games and the 1997 national championship.

Jim Hannon

Aug. 28 at age 92. Longtime track announcer at Suffolk Downs.

Clifford Robinson

Aug. 29 at 53. University of Connecticut standout in the late 1980s who became one of the NBA’s best Sixth Men with the Trail Blazers.

Clifford Robinson reached the NBA Finals twice with the Trail Blazers.
Clifford Robinson reached the NBA Finals twice with the Trail Blazers.JACK SMITH/Associated Press

John Thompson

Aug. 30 at age 78. Basketball Hall of Famer who coached Georgetown for 27 years (1972-99), winning the 1984 national championship, and also a two-time NBA champion as a player with the Celtics in the 1960s.

John Thompson compiled a 596-239 record at Georgetown for a sparkling 71.4 winning percentage.
John Thompson compiled a 596-239 record at Georgetown for a sparkling 71.4 winning percentage.Anestis Diakopoulos/Associated Press

Tom Seaver

Aug. 31 at age 75. Hall of Fame pitcher who was the centerpiece of the Mets’ improbable 1969 World Series championship and whose illustrious résumé included a Rookie of the Year award, three Cy Youngs, and five 20-win seasons.

Tom Seaver went 25-7 in 1969, a season that changed everything for the New York Mets.
Tom Seaver went 25-7 in 1969, a season that changed everything for the New York Mets.Bloomberg

Tom Jernstedt

Sept. 5 at age 75. NCAA administrator credited with transforming the annual national basketball championship tournament into March Madness, a billion-dollar enterprise.

Lou Brock

Sept. 6 at age 81. Hall of Fame outfielder who holds the National League records for stolen bases in a season and a career, and helped the Cardinals win two World Series in the 1960s.

Lou Brock steals second against the Red Sox in the 1967 World Series, with Mike Andrews taking the throw.
Lou Brock steals second against the Red Sox in the 1967 World Series, with Mike Andrews taking the throw. dan goshtigian/PDFPAGES

Gene Budig

Sept. 8 at age 81. American League president from 1994-2000.

Alan Minter

Sept. 10 at age 69. British boxing great who briefly held the world middleweight title in 1980 before losing it to Marvin Hagler.

Jack Kelley

Sept. 16 at age 93. Hockey coach who led Boston University to national championships in 1971 and ’72 before becoming the first coach and general manager of the WHA’s New England Whalers.

Larry Wilson

Sept. 17 at age 83. Hall of Fame safety who had 52 interceptions in his 13-year career with the St. Louis Cardinals.

Gary Hughes

Sept. 19 at age 79. Popular baseball scout who worked for 11 teams in a 54-year career, including the Red Sox (2012-19).

Wes Tuttle

Sept. 19 at age 62. General manager of New England Sports Center in Marlborough since 1994 and an influential figure in local youth hockey.

Albert Langlois

Sept. 20 at age 85. Defenseman who played on three Stanley Cup winners with Montreal (1958-60) and finished his career in 1966 with the Bruins, his fourth NHL team.

Bob Nevin

Sept. 21 at age 82. Right winger whose 18-year NHL career included two Stanley Cups with the Maple Leafs (1962-63) and the Rangers captaincy for seven seasons (1965-71).

Gale Sayers

Sept. 23 at age 77. Hall of Fame running back/returner whose electrifying talent made him a near-unstoppable force for the Chicago Bears in the 1960s before knee injuries ended his career.

Gale Sayers played only 68 NFL games but established himself as one of the greatest ever all-purpose backs.
Gale Sayers played only 68 NFL games but established himself as one of the greatest ever all-purpose backs.Associated Press

Derland Moore

Sept. 24 at age 68. Standout defensive lineman for the New Orleans Saints (1973-85).

Jay Johnstone

Sept. 26 at a age 74. Well-traveled outfielder who played on World Series champions with the Dodgers and Yankees, was renowned throughout baseball as a prankster, and dabbled in acting (“The Naked Gun").

Lou Johnson

Sept. 30 at age 86. Outfielder whose home run in Game 7 helped the Dodgers win the 1965 World Series.

Bob Miller

Oct. 1 at age 64. Bruins center who as a rookie in 1977-78 was one of the team’s NHL-record 11 20-goal scorers.

Bob Miller collected 55 goals and 82 assists as a Bruin over 3½ seasons.
Bob Miller collected 55 goals and 82 assists as a Bruin over 3½ seasons.Steve Babineau/NHLI via Getty Images

Bob Gibson

Oct. 2 at age 84. Hall of Fame pitcher who intimidated batters like few others, winning two World Series with the Cardinals in the 1960s and setting a modern standard for excellence with a 1.12 ERA in 1968.

Bob Gibson fanned a record 17 batters in Game 1 of the 1968 World Series against the Tigers.
Bob Gibson fanned a record 17 batters in Game 1 of the 1968 World Series against the Tigers.Associated Press

Ron Perranoski

Oct. 2 at age 84. Lefthanded relief specialist who helped the Dodgers win two World Series in the 1960s.

Fred Wenz

Oct. 6 at age 79. Relief pitcher who saw action in nine games for the Red Sox in 1968-69.

Charlie Moore

Oct. 8 at age 91. American runner who won the 400 hurdles in the 1952 Helsinki Olympics.

Whitey Ford

Oct. 8 at age 91. Anchor on the pitching staffs of the great Yankees teams of the 1950s and ’60s who played on six World Series champions, had the highest winning percentage of the 20th century (.690), and hurled a record 33 consecutive scoreless World Series innings.

Whitey Ford was MVP of the 1961 World Series, winning twice and not giving up a run in 14 innings.
Whitey Ford was MVP of the 1961 World Series, winning twice and not giving up a run in 14 innings.Associated Press

Jimmie Lee Solomon

Oct. 9 at age 64. Longtime front office figure who as executive vice president of baseball operations was among the highest-ranking Black executives in the MLB hierarchy.

Joe Morgan

Oct. 11 at age 77. Diminutive but dynamic second baseman who combined power and speed in winning two National League MVP awards and two World Series with the Reds in a Hall of Fame career.

Joe Morgan singles home the decisive run in the ninth inning of Game 7 against the Red Sox in the 1975 World Series.
Joe Morgan singles home the decisive run in the ninth inning of Game 7 against the Red Sox in the 1975 World Series.Frank O'Brien/Globe Staff

Gary Jones

Oct. 11 at age 76. Hall of Fame horse trainer whose charges included Best Pal and who racked up more than $52 million in purses and 1,400 victories.

Fred Dean

Oct. 14 at age 68. Fearsome pass rusher who was an All-Pro for the Chargers and won two Super Bowls with the 49ers in his Hall of Fame career.

Fred Dean (center) made four Pro Bowls and was first-team All-Pro twice.
Fred Dean (center) made four Pro Bowls and was first-team All-Pro twice.Anonymous/Associated Press

Sid Hartman

Oct. 18 at age 100. Longtime columnist for the Minneapolis Star-Tribune who also was de facto general manager of the Minneapolis Lakers in the 1940s and ’50s.

Derryl Cousins

Oct. 20 at age 74. Major league umpire from 1979-2012 who worked three World Series.

Bill Mathis

Oct. 20 at age 81. Running back who was an original New York Jet (i.e. Titan) and played on their Super Bowl-winning team of 1968.

Tom Yewcic

Oct. 20 at age 88. Two-sport star who as quarterback/punter led Michigan State to the 1952 national championship and was MVP of the 1954 College World Series before playing six years with the AFL’s Boston Patriots.

Matt Blair

Oct. 22 at age 70. Pro Bowl linebacker for the Minnesota Vikings who played in two Super Bowls with them.

W.C. Gorden

Oct. 23 at age 90. College Football Hall of Fame coach who went 119–48–5 at Jackson State.

Jimmy Orr

Oct. 27 at age 85. Sure-handed receiver for the Baltimore Colts who played on their Super Bowl III team.

Travis Roy

Oct. 29 at age 45. Boston University hockey player who after sustaining a paralyzing injury on his first collegiate shift devoted his life to a foundation that helped others with spinal injuries, becoming a symbol of courage and an inspiration to many.

Travis Roy greeted supporters at the Travis Roy Foundation Wiffle Ball Tournament in Vermont in 2013.
Travis Roy greeted supporters at the Travis Roy Foundation Wiffle Ball Tournament in Vermont in 2013.Globe staff photo by Stan Grossfeld

Herb Adderley

Oct. 30 at age 81. Hall of Fame cornerback who won five NFL championships with the Packers and one with the Cowboys.

Paul Crane

Oct. 31 at age 76. Center on two national champion football teams at Alabama and linebacker on the Jets team that won Super Bowl III.

Billy Tubbs

Nov. 1 at age 85. Colorful coach who brought Oklahoma basketball to prominence in the 1980s.

Jim Neilson

Nov. 5 at age 79. Stalwart defenseman who played 12 of his 16 NHL seasons with the Rangers.

Ray Daviault

Nov. 6 at age 86. An original New York Met who went 1-5 as a righthanded starter/reliever in 1962, his only season in the majors.

Howie Meeker

Nov. 8 at age 97. NHL Rookie of the Year in 1947 who went on to play on four Stanley Cup winners with the Maple Leafs before a renowned career as a broadcaster.

Tom Heinsohn

Nov. 9 at age 86. Iconic Celtics figure who won eight NBA titles as a player, two as a coach, and became an immensely popular broadcaster for the team.

Modern Celtics fans knew Tom Heinsohn as a bombastic broadcaster, but he also was a Hall of Fame player and coach.
Modern Celtics fans knew Tom Heinsohn as a bombastic broadcaster, but he also was a Hall of Fame player and coach.Matthew J. Lee/Globe staff

Paul Hornung

Nov. 13 at age 84. Heisman Trophy winner for Notre Dame in 1956 and Hall of Fame halfback who starred on four Green Bay Packers NFL championship teams in the 1960s.

Paul Hornung was a dazzling ballcarrier (and a placekicker) in his days as the Packers' "Golden Boy."
Paul Hornung was a dazzling ballcarrier (and a placekicker) in his days as the Packers' "Golden Boy."LJG/Associated Press

Terry Duerod

Nov. 13 at age 64. Guard/forward who became a late-game fan favorite during his 1½ seasons with the Celtics, which included a championship in 1981.

Lindy McDaniel

Nov. 14 at age 84. Reliable righthander who was mostly a long reliever in a 21-year major league career, the bulk of which was spent with the Cardinals and Yankees.

Fred Morrison

Nov. 15 at age 94. Running back who was MVP of the 1950 Rose Bowl for Ohio State and played on two NFL champions with the Browns in 1954-55.

Walt Davis

Nov. 16 at age 89. Gold medalist in the high jump at the 1952 Olympics who also played on NBA champions for Philadelphia (1956) and St. Louis (1958).

Jake Scott

Nov. 19 at age 75. Star safety on the Dolphins’ two champion teams of the 1970s and MVP of Super Bowl VII, which clinched the perfect 17-0-0 season of 1972.


Jake Scott (right) helps break up a pass intended for Washington's Charley Taylor during Super Bowl VII.
Jake Scott (right) helps break up a pass intended for Washington's Charley Taylor during Super Bowl VII.Associated Press

Ken Schinkel

Nov. 20 at age 87. Original member of the expansion Pittsburgh Penguins and the first All-Star in franchise history.

Jim Hanifan

Nov. 24 at age 87. Head coach of the NFL’s St. Louis Cardinals from 1980-85.

Fred Sasakamoose

Nov. 24 at age 86. One of the first Indigenous players in the National Hockey League, seeing action in 11 games for the Black Hawks in 1953-54.

Diego Maradona

Nov. 25 at age 60. All-time soccer great — widely considered among the top players in history — who led Argentina to the 1986 World Cup title.

Diego Maradona, the Argentine captain, brandishes the World Cup trophy after his team clinched the title in 1986.
Diego Maradona, the Argentine captain, brandishes the World Cup trophy after his team clinched the title in 1986.Bob Thomas/Getty Images

Markus Paul

Nov. 25 at age 54. Assistant strength coach on three Patriots teams that won Super Bowls.

Bob Miller

Nov. 28 at age 94. Righthander who went 11-6 as a rookie on the 1950 Phillies “Whiz Kids” National League champions.

Joe Mooney

Nov. 29 at age 90. Longtime Fenway Park groundskeeper renowned for his meticulous care of the ballfield.

Jack Foley

Nov. 29 at age 81. Holy Cross basketball great known as “The Shot” who has the highest career scoring average in school history (28.4 points) and briefly played for the Celtics.

Denis Menke

Dec. 1 at age 80. Journeyman infielder who made two All-Star teams with the Astros and was a member of the Reds’ 1972 NL champions.

Rafer Johnson

Dec. 2 at age 86. One of the greatest all-around athletes in the world in the late 1950s and gold medalist in the decathlon at the 1960 Rome Olympics.

Rafer Johnson hurls the shot put during his triumphant decathlon effort at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome.
Rafer Johnson hurls the shot put during his triumphant decathlon effort at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome.Associated Press

Marv Marinovich

Dec. 3 at age 81. Lineman who captained Southern Cal’s 1962 national champion football team, became one of the NFL’s first strength and conditioning coaches, and was the father of quarterback Todd Marinovich.

Tracy Sormanti

Dec. 4 at age 58. Patriots cheerleading director since 1994 admired for her dedication to her work.

Mike Shalin

Dec. 5 at age 66. Red Sox beat writer for the Herald and official scorer at Fenway Park.

Peter Alliss

Dec. 5 at age 89. British golfer who won 23 tournaments worldwide, played in 10 Ryder Cups, and as a commentator became the popular and eccentric “Voice of Golf.”

Jack Scarbath

Dec. 6 at age 90. College Football Hall of Fame quarterback who had a 24-4-1 record at Maryland.

Dennis Ralston

Dec. 6 at age 78. Tennis Hall of Famer who won five Grand Slam doubles titles.

Dick Allen

Dec. 7 at age 78. Slugger who was National League Rookie of the Year for the Phillies in 1964 and American League MVP for the White Sox in 1972.

Fred Akers

Dec. 7 at age 82. University of Texas football coach who went 86-31-2 in 10 years, with two undefeated regular seasons.

Rogelio Moret

Dec. 7 at age 71. Lanky lefthander who went 41-18 in six seasons with the Red Sox, including 14-3 for the 1975 American League champions.

Ray Perkins

Dec. 9 at age 79. Head coach of the New York Giants (1979-82) and Alabama (1983-86) and Patriots offensive coordinator (1993-96).

Paolo Rossi

Dec. 9 at age 64. Italian soccer star who in 1982 won the Ballon d’Or as Europe’s best player and led his country to the World Cup championship.

Alex Olmedo

Dec. 9 at age 84. Tennis Hall of Famer who won the Wimbledon and Australian titles in 1959.

Phil Linz

Dec. 9 at age 81. Yankees infielder who achieved a place in franchise lore by annoying manager Yogi Berra with his harmonica on the team bus in 1964.

Sue Donohoe

Dec. 13 at age 61. Former director of both the women’s and men’s NCAA Division 1 basketball tournaments.

Pierre Lacroix

Dec. 13 at age 72. President/general manager who built the Colorado Avalanche teams that won Stanley Cups in 1996 and 2001.

Gerard Houllier

Dec. 14 at age 73. Liverpool soccer coach who in 2001 led the team to FA Cup, League Cup, and UEFA Cup titles.

Bruce Seals

Dec. 15 at age 67. Former NBA and ABA player who had a profound impact on young people in his role as athletic director at the Dorchester Boys and Girls Club for three decades.

Lorenzo Taliaferro

Dec. 16 at age 28. Baltimore Ravens running back (2014-16).

Kevin Greene

Dec. 21 at age 58. Hall of Fame linebacker known as one of the NFL’s fiercest pass rushers in his days with the Rams, Steelers, Panthers, and 49ers.

Ron Widby

Dec. 23 at age 75. Punter for the Dallas Cowboys’ first Super Bowl champions in 1971.

K.C. Jones

Dec. 25 at age 88. All-time Celtics great and Basketball Hall of Famer who won eight championships as a player in the 1960s and coached the team to two more titles in the 1980s.

K.C. Jones's coaching record with the Celtics was 308-102, with four consecutive trips to the NBA Finals.
K.C. Jones's coaching record with the Celtics was 308-102, with four consecutive trips to the NBA Finals.Frank O'Brien, Globe Staff/The Boston Globe

Phil Niekro

Dec. 26 at age 81. Hall of Fame knuckleball pitcher who compiled 318 wins in a 24-year career with the Braves, Indians, Yankees, and Blue Jays.

Phil Niekro pitched in the major leagues until age 48, winning 121 games in his 40s.
Phil Niekro pitched in the major leagues until age 48, winning 121 games in his 40s.Associated Press

Loyd Phillips

Dec. 27 at age 75. College Football Hall of Fame defensive lineman who won the Outland Trophy with Arkansas in 1966.