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HERE

Waterville offers night skiing

Ski under the lights at Waterville Valley Resort thanks to a new agreement with the US Forest Service (the resort sits on 540 private acres surrounded by national forest). Waterville Valley now offers night skiing off the Exhibition Poma lift, which lets you access the Exhibition, Lower White Caps, and Pasture trails — and soon Higher Ground and World Cup. Exhibition, the widest trail on the mountain, features a NASTAR racecourse during the day and offers groomed terrain for all abilities at night. You’ll need to purchase a $25 night-skiing ticket ($20 for passholders) online in advance, due to limited capacity. Ski under the lights Fridays 3:30-8 p.m. (with the exception of Jan. 22, which runs 4-8 p.m.) and Saturdays 4-9 p.m. through Feb. 27. www.waterville.com

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Sam Durant’s "Transcendental (Wheatley's Desk, Emerson's Chair)" is part of “Visionary New England” at deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum.
Sam Durant’s "Transcendental (Wheatley's Desk, Emerson's Chair)" is part of “Visionary New England” at deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum.Joshua White

Multimedia show at deCordova

There’s still time to catch a thought-provoking show at the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum that highlights New England’s place as a leader in community and social reform. “Visionary New England,” on display through March, includes more than 80 contemporary works of art, 30 historic artifacts and books, and one outdoor installation created specifically for this exhibit. You’ll find contemporary paintings, photography, sculpture, and historical artifacts. Check out Sam Durant’s creative wooden piece, called “Transcendental (Wheatley’s Desk, Emerson’s Chair)” or Kim Weston’s wispy and energetic photographic print “Reflections.” Don’t go without a ticket, though: Visitors must purchase tickets online in advance for a specific time slot. Adults $14, seniors $12, students with ID $10, under 12 free. 781-259-8355, thetrustees.org/decordova

THERE

Read this new XC ski mag

A lifestyle e-magazine geared to recreational Nordic skiers launched this year, offering articles on everything from gear to gourmet food. The Nordic Approach targets the ever-growing number of cross-country ski enthusiasts interested in learning more about the sport, along with those who falsely believe that “it’s stodgy, it’s no fun, or it’s too hard,” says Reese Brown, executive director of the Woodstock-based Cross Country Ski Areas Association and founder of The Nordic Approach. “I’m trying to change that conversation. Nordic skiing can be incredibly thrilling. I’m also trying to talk about the lifestyle.” The free e-magazine covers mainly US and Canada destinations (and an occasional European spot), road trips to New England ski areas (more than 50 Nordic ski areas exist here), gear reviews, foodie topics, health and wellness tips, and how-tos. Insider tip: You’ll enjoy it even if you’re not a skier. thenordicapproach.com

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A rarity in the French Quarter

New Orleans’s vibrant yet traditional French Quarter hasn’t welcomed a new hotel in more than five decades, which is why the recent opening of the ONE11 Hotel marks a big milestone. The property, located at the site of the former Louisiana Sugar Refining Company, has been transformed into a modern hotel that reflects the multilayered history of the area. The 83-room hotel has three suites — or “sweets,” as it calls them — including the two-bedroom, two-bathroom Riverbend Sweet on the top (eighth) floor, which features two private terraces with seating areas and a wet bar. All guests can enjoy the swimming pool and courtyard with an outdoor fireplace, and rooftop views of the French Quarter and Mississippi River. The hotel’s onsite Batture Bistro + Bar offers craft cocktails and small bites. Onsite self-service parking costs $45 per day, but guests get free access to the One Canal Place Downtown Fitness Center. Rates start at $169 per night. www.one11hotel.com

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The country’s only inbounds backcountry ski area, called Bluebird Backcountry, opened this season in Kremmling, Colo., about 40 minutes from Steamboat Springs and located on the Continental Divide near Rabbit Ears Pass. The ski-patrolled backcountry ski area welcomes skiers of all experience and ability levels and offers everything from mellow meadows to steep slopes.
The country’s only inbounds backcountry ski area, called Bluebird Backcountry, opened this season in Kremmling, Colo., about 40 minutes from Steamboat Springs and located on the Continental Divide near Rabbit Ears Pass. The ski-patrolled backcountry ski area welcomes skiers of all experience and ability levels and offers everything from mellow meadows to steep slopes.Bluebird Backcountry / Doug McLennan

No chairlifts at this ski area

Imagine being able to backcountry ski in fresh Colorado powder without worrying too much about avalanches — plus getting rental gear, lessons, access to a lodge, and all the amenities of a ski area without the crowds or lift lines? The country’s only inbounds backcountry ski area, called Bluebird Backcountry, opened this season in Kremmling, Colo., about 40 minutes from Steamboat Springs and located on the Continental Divide near Rabbit Ears Pass. The ski-patrolled backcountry ski area welcomes skiers of all experience and ability levels and offers everything from mellow meadows to steep slopes. It also offers lessons and clinics, avalanche courses, and preset skin tracks for climbing up Bear Mountain. Bluebird area tops out at just under 10,000 feet and features 1,200 acres of avalanche-controlled terrain to explore. Open Thursdays through Mondays, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. through March 28. Day pass $50 per person; lessons start at $69. Also cool: You can camp there. bluebirdbackcountry.com

Anon’s WM1 (for women, pictured here) and men’s M3 and M4 goggles come with a buff-style magnetic face mask that securely attaches to the bottom edge of the goggles and stays in place while giving you room to breathe. It helps keep you warm and protected while skiing this season.
Anon’s WM1 (for women, pictured here) and men’s M3 and M4 goggles come with a buff-style magnetic face mask that securely attaches to the bottom edge of the goggles and stays in place while giving you room to breathe. It helps keep you warm and protected while skiing this season.handout

EVERYWHERE

Goggles keep you warm and protected

Wearing a buff or neck gaiter while skiing is no biggie most years, but when you’re required to cover your face — for good reason — it seems like that buff won’t stay in place while adventuring. Anon now makes a series of high-end goggles that come with an integrated magnetic face mask. The buff-style face mask securely attaches to the bottom edge of the goggles and stays in place while also giving you room to breathe. Best of all, it doesn’t cause your goggles to fog. The women’s Anon WM1 (for small- to medium-size faces) and the men’s M3 and M4 goggles come with the removable magnetic facemask. These scratch-resistant goggles also incorporate Anon’s MAGNA-TECH technology, which uses magnets to secure the lens in place so you can quickly swap lenses when conditions change. The PERCEIVE lens helps define the terrain, making it a breeze to see even in the most challenging lighting conditions. $229.95 (WM1)-$299.95 (M4). www.burton.com/us/en/c/anon

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KARI BODNARCHUK


Kari Bodnarchuk can be reached at travelwriter@karib.us.