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LETTERS

For democracy to really prevail, there must be accountability

In defiance of the 2020 election results, Donald Trump speaks to supporters from The Ellipse near the White House on Jan. 6.
In defiance of the 2020 election results, Donald Trump speaks to supporters from The Ellipse near the White House on Jan. 6.BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images

With the insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6, we have witnessed the most egregious effort to sabotage democracy in contemporary American history. Nearing the end of his presidency, Donald Trump incited the mob in a failed attempt to overturn the 2020 election results. He assured them, “We love you. You’re very special,” only barely rebuking the violence of the insurrectionists.

A second impeachment, occurring just days before the end of his term, was the most damning way by which Trump could be condemned for his role in fomenting the riot. The most bipartisan impeachment in history may serve as the beginning to a long and necessary process of bringing our former president to justice. We must also bear the responsibility of seeing that his passel of enablers and sycophants face justice for their complicity as well.

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President Joe Biden assured the country in his inaugural speech that “democracy has prevailed.” The coming weeks will reveal whether we are capable of the introspection required for healing. The Biden administration can represent a new beginning; however, unity cannot be achieved at the cost of turning a blind eye to treason. We can only have a fresh start after Trump is held accountable.

Ayleen Cameron

Medford