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Here’s how Mass. residents 75 and older should be able to sign up for the vaccine

A woman received the COVID-19 vaccine at a drive-through public health vaccination site in California.
A woman received the COVID-19 vaccine at a drive-through public health vaccination site in California.Mario Tama/Getty

Massachusetts residents 75 and older should now be able to register for appointments at scores of COVID-19 immunization sites across the state as part of Phase 2 of the state’s vaccination distribution timeline that rolled out the first shots for this age cohort, approximately 450,000 people, on Feb. 1.

Eligible residents under the state’s current inoculation plan include those over 75, but individuals 65 and older and individuals with two or more comorbidities, as well as early education and K-12 and other essential service workers, although also considered part of Phase 2, are not yet eligible.

Also eligible, as of Feb. 11, are caregivers who accompany those 75 and older to vaccination appointments. Companions can include younger partners, adult children, family members, neighbors, and caregivers. Only one companion is permitted to schedule an appointment with each 75-and-older resident, and appointments must be made at one of the state’s mass vaccination sites (Gillette Stadium, Fenway Park, the DoubleTree in Danvers, and the Eastfield Mall in Springfield).

All vaccination locations, which can be viewed at https://www.mass.gov/covid-19-vaccine, require appointments, and individuals must present proof of eligibility to receive the vaccine. The website doesn’t offer a single schedule form, but instead links to signup pages at each location. The vaccine requires two doses that must be received at the same location, according to state officials. The state also notes that it may take several weeks to secure an appointment, and additional appointments will become available as more vaccine supply arrives.

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If seniors cannot access the website to schedule an appointment, the state launched a call center to assist with those who are struggling with online resource.

Here’s how the online registration process should work.

Step 1

Explore this map of vaccination locations, also on mass.gov.

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Step 2

After you pick a site, visit the subsequent website that will prompt you with its own set of instructions on how to make an appointment. The Massachusetts Department of Public Health notes that if individuals live in an eligible public or private affordable low-income senior housing location, there may be an onsite clinic being planned, and that more information will be presented once available.

Step 3

Fill out a self attestation form, and be ready to present it at your appointment. The attestation form is used to demonstrate individuals are eligible for the vaccine. The form is only available for individuals 75 and older once Phase 2 is activated, which was at midnight Wednesday. The form asks individuals to identify which priority group they belong to. It can be filled out online or filled out and printed as a PDF. On the day of your appointment, either show the confirmation email or bring the printed PDF. The attestation can also be done verbally or in writing at the vaccination site, according to the DPH.

Step 4

On the day of your appointment, vaccination sites will likely ask for an insurance card or identification card upon arrival. While the vaccination is free whether or not you have insurance, the state asks that residents bring along their insurance information if they have it. The state also asks that individuals present an identification card that includes residents’ names and titles. Employer-issued or government-issued identification cards, as well as recent paystubs, suffice.

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You will not need to provide a social security card or government-issued identification to receive the vaccine. According to the DPH, you will never be asked for a credit card number to make an appointment.

If individuals need assistance scheduling an appointment, the state recommends contacting the Local Council on Aging or regional Aging Services Access Points. Additional information regarding vaccination options will be released as they become available.

Previous Globe reporting was used to inform this article.


Brittany Bowker can be reached at brittany.bowker@globe.com. Follower her on Twitter @brittbowker.