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LETTERS

Deaths at downtown worksite highlight unconscionable lack of city oversight

A black curtain was set up at the scene of a fatal construction accident on High Street in Boston.
A black curtain was set up at the scene of a fatal construction accident on High Street in Boston.David L. Ryan/Globe Staff

Re “Firm tied to deaths didn’t reveal violations: Fatalities raise questions on safety and city oversight” (Page A1, Feb. 27): This story is infuriating. Why should we be surprised to find that a company that doesn’t adhere to safety standards or pay fines would not tell the City of Boston that when applying for a permit? Yet the city seems a bit surprised.

Then there’s this: “The city could not say how many permits it has denied, saying it has no way to track this.” What? So, besides not finding out what a basic Google search might tell them about companies, they also can’t say whether they’ve ever made any decisions at all. So much for creating good processes and managing safety.

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Shirah Hecht

Needham


I read with incredulity that the City of Boston has no way to track the permits it has denied to contractors. Amazingly, there is a thing called a spreadsheet. Maybe the city could learn how to make one. Any 12-year-old can teach them.

The lack of oversight of these companies is unconscionable. I am a retired union electrician with IBEW Local 103, and I know that safety is a top priority. This horrific story only emphasizes the role that organized labor can play. The city should require that private contractors working on public streets hire union shops.

Two families have their worlds turned upside down now.

Sara Driscoll

Jamaica Plain