fb-pixel Skip to main content
Red Sox

Jackie Bradley Jr. agrees to a two-year, $24 million deal with Brewers

Jackie Bradley Jr., who was drafted by the Red Sox in 2011, has found a new team.
Jackie Bradley Jr., who was drafted by the Red Sox in 2011, has found a new team.Matthew J. Lee/Globe Staff/file

Jackie Bradley Jr. beamed on a gloomy morning in late September. For more than eight years, he donned a Red Sox uniform. Now, at 30 years old, he was a free agent — a goal of his once he realized he was a mainstay in the big leagues.

“This is a big deal,” Bradley said at the time. “Once you first get to the big leagues, your goal is, ‘How can I stick in the big leagues?’ And then once you finally get your feet under you, it’s like, ‘All right, well, if I get three years, I get to arbitration.’ You get three years, arbitration, it’s like, the next step is, ‘All right, well, how can I get to free agency?’ ”

Advertisement



Six months have passed since that moment, but Bradley finally has a team, agreeing to a $24 million, two-year deal with the Milwaukee Brewers with a player option after the first season, according to a major league source.

The Sox took Bradley in the first round (40th overall) in 2011 out of the University of South Carolina. After he reached the big leagues in 2013, his career came with inconsistencies at the plate.

Bradley cracked the Opening Day roster that year after hitting .419 in spring training, but was optioned to Triple A in mid-April. He totaled just 107 plate appearances in the majors that season, hitting .189, then hit .198 the following year in 423 plate appearances.

As a result, Bradley became accustomed to the trip between Fenway and Pawtucket. So much so that he and his wife, Erin, kept their apartment in Rhode Island and made the trip to Boston whenever his number was called.

“Erin and I would just sit in the car in just complete and utter silence,” Bradley said. “I was just completely baffled or angered by the way I had performed. It weighed on me heavy.”

Advertisement



The defense of Jackie Bradley Jr. played a role in making him a fan favorite in Boston.
The defense of Jackie Bradley Jr. played a role in making him a fan favorite in Boston.Jim Davis/The Boston Globe

Bradley’s success with the Sox began in 2016, when he slashed .267/.349/.486 with 26 homers and an .835 OPS. He played a part in the 2018 World Series championship, named ALCS MVP weeks before winning his first and, to date, only Gold Glove.

Bradley is widely considered one of the best, if not the best, center fielder to ever play for the Red Sox. However, his defensive metrics took a hit at Fenway because of its quirky dimensions. It made one former teammate imagine just how good Bradley would be with more room to maneuver.

“I would love to see Jackie play center field in a big outfield like Colorado,” former teammate David Price said last September. “Where you can get to see him run around and get to see him be reckless in the outfield.”

Said Sox reliever Matt Barnes: “To me, he is the best defensive center fielder in the game.”

Jackie Bradley Jr. hits a solo home run Game Three of the 2018 World Series.
Jackie Bradley Jr. hits a solo home run Game Three of the 2018 World Series.Stan Grossfeld

Bradley, who is represented by mega-agent Scott Boras, wanted to take a measured approach to free agency. Bradley, of course, wanted the right financial and baseball fit, but also the right living environment for himself, Erin, and children Emerson and Jackie Bradley III.

Bradley had his share of suitors this offseason, including the New York Mets, San Francisco Giants, and Houston Astros. The Red Sox kept in contact but their conversations were seen more as check-ins than an actual pursuit.

Advertisement



The loss of Bradley officially caps the end of a Red Sox era, with Mookie Betts and Andrew Benintendi traded in consecutive offseasons. Now, Bradley is elsewhere, too.

Bradley’s final season with the Sox was a success. He slashed .283/.364/.450 with 7 homers and an .814 OPS in the 60-game 2020 season. He believes he’s on the right side of 30, even with the doubt that comes with that.

“A lot of people like to say they’re proving people wrong or their critics wrong,” Bradley said. “I come from the mold where I like to prove the people that support me, that love me, my family. I like to prove them right.”


Julian McWilliams can be reached at julian.mcwilliams@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @byJulianMack.