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Tom Brady rookie card sells for a record $1.32 million — and Brady has something to say about it

Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Tom Brady (12) holds the Vince Lombardi trophy following the NFL Super Bowl 55 football game against the Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2021, in Tampa, Fla.
Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Tom Brady (12) holds the Vince Lombardi trophy following the NFL Super Bowl 55 football game against the Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2021, in Tampa, Fla.Ben Liebenberg/Associated Press

A Tom Brady football card from his 2000 season with the New England Patriots sold for a record-setting $1.32 million.

PWCC Marketplace, an Oregon-based company that brokered the sale of the rookie card, announced the news on Instagram Thursday.

“The highest sale for a football card. Ever,” the post said. “This month we had the pleasure of brokering a record-breaking sale on a 2000 Playoff Contenders Championship Ticket Tom Brady. Only one of 100 cards in the world, even less if you consider grade — this incredible card was picked up by James Parker, a long-time Brady fan.”

”I lived in Boston for 10 years and so am a huge fan of Brady,” Parker said in the post. “The last Super Bowl win was just a mind-blowing accomplishment. I’ve also had a love of collecting cards since I was a kid. Given Brady’s uncontested status as GOAT in football, this card is an important piece of sports history and of any collection and I’m incredibly excited to now— own 1 of only 100 of Brady’s best rookie card.”

Brady reacted to the news with some good-natured GOAT humor. He shared PWCC Marketplace’s image on his own Instagram story and joked: “Okay I am definitely cleaning out the basement this morning.”

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On Friday PWCC Marketplace followed up with another Instagram post about the sale, explaining that there were “inconsistencies” with the image that they posted on Thursday and the card that was actually sold.

“To celebrate the historical sale, a member of our team made a mistake in judgment to edit the image to meet our typical imaging standards,” the post said. “Posted is the original, unedited image of the card sold. This is the exact card that the buyer received. We understand and respect the intricacies and nuances of each and every card. There was never any intention to deceive, just to celebrate the sale of a truly exceptional card in our industry.”

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Emily Sweeney can be reached at emily.sweeney@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @emilysweeney.