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Backing Liz Cheney, Charlie Baker reiterates the presidential election was not stolen

Boston, MA -- 5/3/21 --  Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker announces that Massachusetts will transition to a new phase of its vaccination efforts, including gradually ramping down some mass vaccination sites in the coming months and pivoting to more targeted approaches at a press conference held at the State House. (Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff)
Boston, MA -- 5/3/21 -- Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker announces that Massachusetts will transition to a new phase of its vaccination efforts, including gradually ramping down some mass vaccination sites in the coming months and pivoting to more targeted approaches at a press conference held at the State House. (Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff) Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker said Wednesday that US Representative Liz Cheney, a fellow Republican, was “absolutely right” that the presidential election was not stolen.

“I made very clear that I felt the election process that took place back in November was fair, and that President Joe Biden won the election. And, on those issues, I believe Liz Cheney is absolutely right,” Baker said.

Cheney has condemned Donald Trump’s false claim that the election was stolen. Her refusal to stay quiet about Trump’s election lies prompted House Republicans on Wednesday to purge her from their leadership ranks, where she served as House conference chair, the party’s third-ranking House official.

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Cheney, who represents Wyoming, has described her decision to battle the twice-impeached ex-president as a matter of principle, warning that allowing him to claim that the election was stolen amounted to an attack on democracy and is destructive to the Republican Party and its values.

Trump’s stranglehold on the party has prompted some Republicans to threaten to form a third party. A letter signed by a number of prominent GOP members is being prepared for release this week.

Baker said Wednesday he hadn’t been approached about the letter and continued to believe in what he considered Republican values.

“I’ve been a Republican since I was 20 years old. And I continue to believe in what I consider to be sort of the core values of the party,” he said at a media briefing.

“I’ve had my differences, as everybody knows, with plenty of folks in the party over the course of the time that I’ve been in public life. But I’m a big believer in what the party fundamentally stands for, based on what I believe it stands for,” he said.

He also expressed a wish for bipartisan cooperation at the federal level, saying governors are not as partisan.

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“I think in many ways, one of the things I like about playing this role as governor is the fact that most governors will pick up the phone when you call them and help you try to solve whatever problem it is you’re trying to solve and vice versa. Because we have a lot of commonality on that. And I think, in some ways, it’s something I wish there was a lot more of at the federal level,” he said.

Material from Globe news services was used in this report.


Martin Finucane can be reached at martin.finucane@globe.com.