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Take a look at the new mask guidance in Massachusetts

A group of friends dined outdoors at Piattini on Newbury Street on Monday.
A group of friends dined outdoors at Piattini on Newbury Street on Monday.Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

The Baker administration on Monday said that starting May 29, fully vaccinated individuals will no longer need to wear a mask or socially distance indoors or outdoors in most settings, following a similar announcement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week.

Until then, individuals are still required to wear a face covering in all indoor public places and outdoors if they are unable to maintain 6 feet from others. Governor Charlie Baker announced the relaxed mask guidance as part of an updated reopening timeline in which most COVID-19 restrictions in Massachusetts will be lifted by Memorial Day weekend.

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On May 29, masks will still be required for both fully vaccinated and non-vaccinated individuals in certain settings, such as on public transportation, in K-12 schools, and in healthcare facilities. These rules do not apply to children who are 5 years old or younger or for people for whom wearing a face masks poses a health risk.

The state is still advising non-vaccinated individuals to wear face masks and to practice social distancing.

On May 18:

  • Masks will no longer be required for athletes that are 18 years old or younger during outdoor sports.
  • Masks will no longer be required during outdoor activities, such as recess, at K-12 schools and early education programs.

On May 29:

  • Fully vaccinated individuals will no longer need to wear a mask or socially distance indoors or outdoors in most settings.
  • Baker said that as the state transitions away from its current COVID-19 restrictions, some businesses “may choose to set their own requirements for vaccinations or masking.”

On May 29, masks will still be required in these settings:

  • Individuals will still be required to wear a mask while on public and private transportation, such as the MBTA, commuter rail, buses, airplanes, and when in Uber or Lyft rides. Masks will also be required in train stations, bus stops, and airports.
  • Students, teachers, and staff will continue to wear masks inside K-12 public schools, collaboratives, approved special education schools, and childcare programs.
  • Masks will be required for patients and staff in healthcare facilities and provider offices, such as nursing homes, hospitals, doctor’s offices, vaccination sites, and community health centers. Individuals will be required to wear masks in healthcare and rehabilitation day services and programs.
  • Masks will also be required in congregate care settings, including group homes, prisons, and emergency shelter programs.

Anissa Gardizy can be reached at anissa.gardizy@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @anissagardizy8.