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Hull officials issue warning on scary jellyfish in area waters

A foot-wide Lion's Mane jellyfish floated in the water of Scituate Harbor as it passed in the current of high tide at Veteran's Memorial Bridge in June 2020. Photo by John Tlumacki/Globe Staff(metro/FILE)
A foot-wide Lion's Mane jellyfish floated in the water of Scituate Harbor as it passed in the current of high tide at Veteran's Memorial Bridge in June 2020. Photo by John Tlumacki/Globe Staff(metro/FILE)John Tlumacki/Globe Staff

Hull officials on Wednesday warned of recent sightings of humongous Lion’s Mane jellyfish in area waters including Nantasket Beach.

Deputy Fire Chief William Frazier provided details in a strongly worded statement posted to the official Facebook page of the town’s Emergency Management Notifications system.

“Lately there have been some sightings of Lion’s Mane jellyfish in the waters surrounding our town,” Frazier wrote. “It is one of the world’s largest jellyfish, with an orange-brown bell which can grow up to 6 feet wide and tentacles that can grow to lengths exceeding 100 feet.”

He said the sting from a Lion’s Mane is “moderately painful” and can cause allergic reactions that require medical treatment.

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So do yourself a favor if you see one while you’re frolicking in local waters: give it a wide berth, the town advises.

“If you do see one, exit the water and give it plenty of room to avoid those long stinging tentacles,” Frazier wrote. “If you come upon one washed up on the sand, do not attempt to move it, the tentacles can be very difficult to see and some jellyfish can still sting while out of the water.”

He also offered up advice for beach patrons who get stung by the terrifying creatures.

“If you do get stung, exit the water and inspect the affected area. Remove any tentacles using tweezers and gloved hands,” Frazier wrote. “Do not use bare hands to remove any attached tentacles. Rinse the area with warm water and seek medical attention if you have any signs of severe allergic reaction.”


Travis Andersen can be reached at travis.andersen@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @TAGlobe.