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The strong nor’easter continues to pull slowly away from New England this morning, but its impact will be felt for days to come.

The storm created a wind gust as high as 94 miles an hour at the Edgartown ferry dock around 4 a.m. There were numerous other gusts of wind over 70 miles per hour, including ones of 78 miles per hour in Rockport and 84 miles per hour at one station in Duxbury.

All this wind is an indication of the strength of the storm, which underwent bombogenesis overnight. The term bombogenesis is used when a storm’s pressure decreases at least 24 millibars in as many hours.

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Sometimes you’ll also hear the term “bomb cyclone” used for this phenomenon, which is a combination of bombogenesis and cyclone, another name for a low pressure area.

The central pressure of the nor’easter was around 980 millibars early Wednesday.
The central pressure of the nor’easter was around 980 millibars early Wednesday. NOAA

You’re likely wondering what’s going to happen the rest of the day. As the storm continues to move toward the south, the bands of rain that are coming in from the ocean will slowly diminish. Both the intensity of the rain and the frequency of the showers will lessen. Eventually, we will be left with a little bit of drizzle this afternoon, but it will remain very windy through the first part of the day, particularly at the coastline.

This is the fifth year in a row we have had a significant storm this time of year. It is also a time of year that has generated many memorable recent storms, including Sandy in 2012, the Halloween nor’easter of 2011, and the legendary “Perfect Storm” of 1991.

Rainfall will continue across southern New England as bands of moisture rotate in from the ocean Wednesday morning.
Rainfall will continue across southern New England as bands of moisture rotate in from the ocean Wednesday morning. COD weather

The powerful winds have taken their toll. As of early Wednesday morning, nearly 500,000 customers were without power. It may be hard for power crews to restore power along the coastline until these winds subside. I suspect that some folks could be without power for several days. If you need to travel this morning, prepare for closed roads and other hazards. I would recommend holding off hitting the road for a few hours if possible, as the storm should quiet down this afternoon.

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Wind gusts are still going to be near 50 miles per hour over Southeastern Mass. into the afternoon.
Wind gusts are still going to be near 50 miles per hour over Southeastern Mass. into the afternoon. WeatherBELL

Temperatures are going to stay in the 50s during the day today, chilly enough that folks without heat are going to need to put on an extra sweater or two. Fortunately, we’re at the point of the month where the tides are astronomically low, and this avoided us having major coastal flooding issues. It’s a good thing the storm didn’t occur during the higher tides a couple of weeks ago. Had this storm occurred during high tide, this could have been a record-breaking flooding event.

I’m expecting a lot of clouds Thursday and Friday with temperatures in the low-to-mid 50s. At times the sun may break through. It should remain a bit breezy on Thursday, but there won’t be much wind at all on Friday.

Showers will arrive Friday night, probably around midnight, and then continue during the day on Saturday before coming to an end Saturday evening. Sunday generally looks dry. Even if there’s a morning shower, the bulk of the day is partly to mostly cloudy with temperatures of 55 to 64 degrees. For the kids heading out Halloween evening, it will be in the mid-50s under partly cloudy skies.

The 6 p.m. temperatures are forecast to be in the 50s for Halloween under partly cloudy skies.
The 6 p.m. temperatures are forecast to be in the 50s for Halloween under partly cloudy skies. WeatherBELL