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COOKING FOR THE HOLIDAY

Recipe: What is roast turkey without gravy? Here’s a simple recipe for those delectable pan juices.

Turkey Gravy.
Turkey Gravy.Justin Tsucalas/The Washington Post

Serves 8

The pan juices around the roast turkey make delectable gravy. You pour them into a saucepan, skim off the fat, and let them simmer with a little wine or vermouth and chicken stock (or turkey stock, if you've made some). Then whisk in a butter-flour paste until the juices thicken into a thin gravy. The paste is a French technique called beurre manie and it's essentially a roux that you add at the end of simmering instead of at the beginning. If you decide you don't want to make a gravy, don't discard those pan juices. Just tip them into a saucepan, skim off the fat, and bring to a boil. Spoon the juices over the sliced carved turkey before you serve it.

Turkey roasting pan with all the juices
½cup white wine, red wine, or vermouth
cups chicken or turkey stock
Salt and pepper, to taste
4tablespoons butter, at room temperature
6tablespoons flour
Juice of 1/2 lemon

1. When the turkey is done (a meat thermometer will register 165 degrees in three places in the bird and in the center of the stuffing), transfer it to a cutting board or platter; cover loosely with foil and set the turkey in a warm place to rest.

2. Tip the roasting pan juices into a saucepan. Make sure you get all the sediment from the bottom of the pan. If the sediment is hard to release, pour a cup of boiling water into the pan to release it. Tip those pan juices into the saucepan. Let the mixture sit for a minute to let the fat separate from the juices; the fat will float to the top. With a large metal spoon, skim off the fat from the juices.

3. Set the saucepan over medium heat. Add the wine or vermouth and stock. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the mixture comes to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer for 5 minutes, skimming the fat from the surface. Lower the heat.

4. On a plate, mash the butter and flour together with a fork to make a paste. Stir the butter-flour mixture into the saucepan a little at a time. Cook the gravy, stirring often, for 3 to 5 minutes or until the mixture thickens. If you prefer a thicker gravy, make more butter-flour paste and whisk it in a little at a time. Let the gravy cook for at least 3 minutes after you whisk in more thickener.

5. Add the lemon juice. Taste for seasoning, and add more salt and pepper, if you like. Keep the gravy warm until serving.

Sheryl Julian

Serves 8

The pan juices around the roast turkey make delectable gravy. You pour them into a saucepan, skim off the fat, and let them simmer with a little wine or vermouth and chicken stock (or turkey stock, if you've made some). Then whisk in a butter-flour paste until the juices thicken into a thin gravy. The paste is a French technique called beurre manie and it's essentially a roux that you add at the end of simmering instead of at the beginning. If you decide you don't want to make a gravy, don't discard those pan juices. Just tip them into a saucepan, skim off the fat, and bring to a boil. Spoon the juices over the sliced carved turkey before you serve it.

Turkey roasting pan with all the juices
½cup white wine, red wine, or vermouth
cups chicken or turkey stock
Salt and pepper, to taste
4tablespoons butter, at room temperature
6tablespoons flour
Juice of 1/2 lemon

1. When the turkey is done (a meat thermometer will register 165 degrees in three places in the bird and in the center of the stuffing), transfer it to a cutting board or platter; cover loosely with foil and set the turkey in a warm place to rest.

2. Tip the roasting pan juices into a saucepan. Make sure you get all the sediment from the bottom of the pan. If the sediment is hard to release, pour a cup of boiling water into the pan to release it. Tip those pan juices into the saucepan. Let the mixture sit for a minute to let the fat separate from the juices; the fat will float to the top. With a large metal spoon, skim off the fat from the juices.

3. Set the saucepan over medium heat. Add the wine or vermouth and stock. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the mixture comes to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer for 5 minutes, skimming the fat from the surface. Lower the heat.

4. On a plate, mash the butter and flour together with a fork to make a paste. Stir the butter-flour mixture into the saucepan a little at a time. Cook the gravy, stirring often, for 3 to 5 minutes or until the mixture thickens. If you prefer a thicker gravy, make more butter-flour paste and whisk it in a little at a time. Let the gravy cook for at least 3 minutes after you whisk in more thickener.

5. Add the lemon juice. Taste for seasoning, and add more salt and pepper, if you like. Keep the gravy warm until serving.Sheryl Julian


Sheryl Julian can be reached at sheryl.julian@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @sheryljulian.