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This is hardly the time to throw shade on efforts to prevent the killing of animals in shelters (“Why ‘Adopt Don’t Shop’ Isn’t Always Best,” October 31). Every dog or cat bred for profit brings a death sentence to another waiting for a good home. This is simple math. But the issue of dog and cat adoption is not about numbers, it is about living and breathing animals. Until and unless the Perspective writer, Jeff Harder, spends time at his local shelter on kill day putting down “[j]ust under 10 percent of dogs and 13 percent of cats,” he will never understand this issue.

Christine A. Dorchak

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Arlington

Harder’s article completely missed the mark. While it’s true local shelters are running low on cats and dogs, those in the South are overrun and many organizations are sending these wonderful pets up to New England. Our retriever mix is a Tennessee rescue dog we got from Big Fluffy Dog Rescue. Our cat is a Louisiana rescue girl we got from Emma’s Angels Rescue, a Maine group that ships pets up from the South. These wonderful animals make great pets.

Arnie Pollinger

Holliston

My boyfriend and I went through all of these options in the past year. First, shelters were receiving so many applications for dogs that we didn’t have a prayer of getting one. Then, we started looking into puppies we could get online, but once again, they were in high demand. Eventually, we mistakenly applied for a shelter dog that had some behavioral issues that weren’t advertised, but by applying for that dog, we could get a foot in the door. Three weeks ago we met our little Goose. I’m not sure what our next step would have been if we didn’t find our perfect match by accident, but I know we were very tempted to pay someone $2K for a no-questions-asked puppy because we had waited and been told no so many times. I think shelters are great, but there needs to be more options because it’s very hard to distinguish a reputable breeder online.

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CWPzzz

posted on bostonglobe.com

We went to many shelters and rescue leagues in the area, but we could not get a dog. We tried it first when we got our Rusty (a red cocker spaniel) and now with our miniature poodle puppy, Ashoka. The rescue leagues have long forms and multi-step processes. They are very picky about placing dogs. We never qualified. We are good dog owners. I grew up with dogs but these rescues and shelters had very definite procedures and policies. We would have loved a rescue dog, but we could not get one. That fact, combined with having a husband and daughter who have severe allergies, meant we went with a breeder and both times got puppies that would not shed. So, it depends.

MKLofurno

posted on bostonglobe.com

Shelters are “judgmental” about who they adopt to because they have seen utter horror and they want to make sure they get it right, both for the adoptive family and the pet. Pets can be traumatized by many environmental changes and they become harder to adopt after being returned to the shelter. An “ask no questions” breeder doesn’t care if you provide a good home or if it’s a good fit, they breed to make money.

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MotherOfDragons

posted on bostonglobe.com

Obviously [some people] have no idea what reputable breeders go through and the expenses they incur. It starts with health testing for the parents, which alone can run from hundreds to thousands. Next is the vet care and checkups during the pregnancy. Often, despite the best planning, an emergency C-section can be needed. Add [what could be] another $2,500. Then come weeks of possibly round-the-clock hours caring for the puppies—and vet checks and initial shots. Oh, and after all of that, the litter may only consist of a puppy or two.

eppo

posted on bostonglobe.com

The writer does not go far enough in providing tangible information that would be helpful to would-be pet parents to help navigate selecting a breeder. The writer makes it seem like there are two choices: reputable breeders, and puppy mills. The reality is there is a lot of gray area in between, including “backyard breeders” that present as if they are reputable but are not providing a level of health care or genetic testing that a vet would recommend to ensure the puppy does not have genetic health issues.

user_3825326

posted on bostonglobe.com

It’s not the dog’s fault where they end up or come from. A loving home is what they need and deserve after their journey—whether mill, pound, or breeder. As humans we need to care for them with all we can muster. They return so much to us—unconditional love, joy, happiness, and companionship.

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soxfaninkennett

posted on bostonglobe.com

It is not that hard to separate out the good from the bad breeders. There are robust postings about breeds and breeders that did not exist a decade ago. Ask questions of the breeder. Ask the breeder for references. Google the breeder and you will be lead to dog Facebook pages and blogs or other postings from both satisfied and dissatisfied owners. Do not buy from a breeder who refuses to meet with you. Do not buy a dog online without going to visit the dog and the breeder. Chances are, a breeder who could care less who you are could also care less about the health of their dogs.

V-11

posted on bostonglobe.com

Ultimately whether a dog is “adopted” or “bought” is less important if the final place of that dog is a loving home!

b21

posted on bostonglobe.com

You can’t make that choice for someone else. My extended family has owned a certain breed for years. We love this particular breed. When I get my new puppy in December, I will donate to the MSPCA. We had one “rehomed” dog and he was so damaged, he had separation anxiety and many weird little tics. He was not easy and it didn’t change. I wouldn’t do it again. I want a puppy from the very beginning to ensure a well adjusted dog.

eddiedow

posted on bostonglobe.com

Go to the shelter, meet the dog, help an animal. It’s still a great way to adopt a pet. I have two, and love them both. Not everybody has $1,600 for a dog, and it’s no guarantee it will be perfect. EVERY dog probably has an issue of some type.

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Mr.Cape

posted on bostonglobe.com

Actually, you help TWO: the one you take home and the one that now has a spot at the shelter that you freed up.

klor98

posted on bostonglobe.com


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