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TV CRITIC'S CORNER

‘Loot’ is rich with relationships, if not messages

From left: Joel Kim Booster, Maya Rudolph, and Ron Funches in the Apple TV+ comedy "Loot," which premieres Friday.APPLE TV+

Like its star, Maya Rudolph, the new comedy “Loot” is pleasingly eccentric. Rudolph plays Molly Novak, who catches her billionaire husband (Adam Scott) cheating and walks out of the marriage with $87 billion. A little bored, she decides to work in the office of a charitable foundation she forgot she started years ago.

Philanthropy as a whim? It’s funny enough, and it gives Rudolph plenty of room to play grandiose while simultaneously making fun of filthy rich people’s lives. Doesn’t everyone jet around the world for dinner dates, as she does? Doesn’t everyone eat meals cooked by David Chang (in a cameo)? Isn’t everyone attended to with passion and deference by a personal assistant — in Molly’s case Nicholas, who is played wonderfully by Joel Kim Booster (“Fire Island”)?

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Booster and the rest of the office ensemble give the show, from Alan Yang (“Parks and Recreation”) and Matt Hubbard (“30 Rock”), its warmth and heart. Molly’s cousin Howard, an IT guy, is played with sweet optimism and supportiveness by Ron Funches, and Nat Faxon is endearing as the low-key accountant who may or may not be flirting with Molly. Michaela Jae Rodriguez from “Pose” plays the director of the foundation, a severe and driven leader who has little patience for Molly’s frivolousness. Molly certainly has an arc awaiting her, as she must learn to take charity seriously and not hand out panini presses at the opening of a homeless shelter — but Sofia also has a few lessons waiting for her about being human.

“Loot,” which premieres on Apple TV+ on Friday, occasionally tries to make big points about big money, but they feel less than half-hearted. The real strength of the show is the workplace relationships, most notably the surprising bond that forms between Nicholas and Howard, who are at opposite ends of the personality spectrum. “Loot” also provides us with an opportunity to watch Rudolph have fun, always a good thing in my book.

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Matthew Gilbert can be reached at matthew.gilbert@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @MatthewGilbert.