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HALL OF FAME 2022

How it happened: David Ortiz’s Hall of Fame speech caps special day in Cooperstown

Jim Kaat (left), Tony Oliva, and David Ortiz pose with their plaques on Sunday.John Minchillo/Associated Press

David Ortiz has been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

The Red Sox slugger, who helped Boston break its championship curse in 2004 en route to winning three World Series rings, entered Cooperstown in his first year of eligibility.

During his speech, which ran about 18 minutes, Ortiz weaved from English to Spanish, acknowledging his Dominican roots in front of legions of loyal fans who trekked to upstate New York to watch their hero achieve baseball immortality.

Ortiz is just the fourth player born in the Dominican Republic to be elected to the Hall of Fame. He joins Juan Marichal (1983), fellow Red Sox legend (and close friend) Pedro Martinez (2015), and Vladimir Guerrero (2018).

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The slugger, who is the only designated hitter elected to the Hall on the first ballot, was emotional and grateful for those who supported him on his journey from the Twins to the Red Sox, where he found immense success and legions of loyal fans.

“I can’t thank you enough for building me up and supporting me throughout the years,” he said of Red Sox leadership. “That organization made me the man I am today.”

Ortiz was inducted alongside Tony Oliva, Jim Kaat, and deceased inductees Buck O’Neil, Bud Fowler, Minnie Miñoso, and Gil Hodges.

An estimated crowd of 35,000 traveled to Cooperstown for the first “normal” induction ceremony since 2019.

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Watch David Ortiz’s Hall of Fame speech — 5:00 p.m.

Here’s a video of the entire speech.

Inside the Hall of Fame plaque — 4:30 p.m.

Here’s what it says on Ortiz’s plaque:

Minnesota A.L. 1997-2002; Boston A.L., 2003-16. Powerhouse left-handed slugger who was at his best in the clutch with legendary postseason performances that took the Red Sox from championship drought to three World Series titles in a 10-year stretch. Eight times named top designated hitter while earning 10 All-Star selections. Drove in 100-or-more runs in 10 seasons, leading American League three times. His 541 home runs, 632 doubles and 1,768 RBI are all-time highs among designated hitters. Extra innings walk-off hits in Games 4 and 5 of 2004 A.L.C.S, netted series M.V.P. honors. Set A.L. record for batting average (.688) en route to 2013 World Series M.V.P.

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Learn more about how the plaque came together here.

Ortiz’s interview after the speech — 4:17 p.m.

Ortiz joined Peter Gammons and Greg Amsinger after the speech for an interview.

Oh wow,” Ortiz said with the plaque on his lap. “This is like a new baby right here.”

He continues: “It’s a serious honor to be able to be part of this incredible group of players that have done amazing things and have amazing careers.”

‘You can change their future:’ Ortiz wraps up speech — 4:08 p.m.

“When you believe in someone, you can change their world, you can change their future,” Ortiz said as he entered the end of his speech, acknowledging all of the people in his life who supported him.

Ortiz spoke for almost 20 minutes.

‘I love you, Boston’ — 4:06 p.m.

Ortiz said among the many moments that stand out, that he particularly recalls the 2013 season in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing.

Ortiz says after his final game in 2016, it felt like everyone in New England was on the field with him. He says Boston will always be in his heart and he will always be there for the city.

‘Our teammates are our second family’ — 4:04 p.m.

Ortiz shouts out “los chicos locos” — his former teammates with the Red Sox, like Johnny Damon, Tim Wakefield, and Dustin Pedroia, among others.

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“I can’t forget about Jason Varitek. That man is serious. I love you, Cap.”

‘Mi compadre Pedro’ — 4:01 p.m.

Ortiz shifts back into Spanish to shout out his close friend and fellow Hall of Famer Pedro Martinez.

“I could talk about Pedro all day long. I am going to let it go now.”

Ortiz thanks his agent, Fern Cuza, who has been with Ortiz since Ortiz was 17.

Ortiz begins to thank the Red Sox — 3:59 p.m.

Ortiz thanks owner John Henry and his wife Linda (who also own the Globe), Tom Werner, and Sam Kennedy.

“I can’t thank you enough for building me up and supporting me throughout the years ... That organization made me the man I am today.”

He also acknowledged his experience with the Jimmy Fund, and with his own foundation.

‘Mi gente’ — 3:54 p.m.

Ortiz shifts into Spanish as he acknowledges his children, then begins to shout out the legions of Dominican fans who are in Cooperstown to watch their hero be inducted.

Read more about Ortiz’s connection with local Dominicans here.

‘Wow, Cooperstown!’ — 3:50 p.m.

David Ortiz has begun his speech.

“I’ve been thinking about my life, my career, and most of all, the people who believe in me,” he said of his journey to the Hall of Fame.

Ortiz thanks the BBWAA for voting him in on the first ballot — the first designated hitter to earn that honor.

Cheers of “Papi! Papi!” rang out as Ortiz approached the microphone.

What David Ortiz’s Hall of Fame plaque says — 3:48 p.m.

Here’s a first look at Ortiz’s Hall of Fame plaque.

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Jeff Swensen/Jeff Swensen for The Boston Glob

Minnesota A.L. 1997-2002; Boston A.L., 2003-16. Powerhouse left-handed slugger who was at his best in the clutch with legendary postseason performances that took the Red Sox from championship drought to three World Series titles in a 10-year stretch. Eight times named top designated hitter while earning 10 All-Star selections. Drove in 100-or-more runs in 10 seasons, leading American League three times. His 541 home runs, 632 doubles and 1,768 RBI are all-time highs among designated hitters. Extra innings walk-off hits in Games 4 and 5 of 2004 A.L.C.S, netted series M.V.P. honors. Set A.L. record for batting average (.688) en route to 2013 World Series M.V.P.

Crafting a Hall of Fame plaque: Go behind-the-scenes as David Ortiz’s hardware was created — 3:47 p.m.

Peter Abraham got a behind-the-scenes look at how a Hall of Fame plaque is created.

Learn more here.

What to expect from Ortiz’s speech — 3:45 p.m.

Inductees have been asked to limit their speeches to 10 minutes or less (not that all have followed that today).

Ortiz has said he will speak in English and Spanish.

Dr. Angela Terry, Buck O’Neil’s niece, wraps up. — 3:42 p.m.

David Ortiz will take to the podium shortly.

David Ortiz will be speaking next — 3:34 p.m.

Sixth inductee: Buck O’Neil, with his niece speaking on his behalf — 3:29 p.m.

O’Neil played in the Negro Leagues for 10 seasons and joined the Chicago Cubs as a scout in 1955. Chicago promoted him to their coaching staff in 1962, making O’Neil the first Black coach in American League or National League history. He also led the creation of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum, established in 1990.

Fifth inductee: Gil Hodges, with his daughter speaking on his behalf — 3:12 p.m.

Hodges played 16 seasons with the Brooklyn (later Los Angeles) Dodgers and two with the New York Mets. He finished his playing career as an eight-time All-Star, a three-time Gold Glove winner at first base, and a two-time World Series champion.

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Hodges would later become a manager for nine seasons and won the 1969 World Series with the Mets.

Tony Oliva says Luis Tiant belongs in the Hall — 3:00 p.m.

Fourth inductee: Tony Oliva — 2:47 p.m.

Tony Oliva, Jim Kaat, and David Ortiz are the only living players being inducted today.

Oliva batted .304 across his 15-year career with the Minnesota Twins. He earned three batting titles and led MLB in hits in five seasons.

Oliva was named American League rookie of the year in 1964 and had eight consecutive All-Star appearances from 1964-1971.

Third inductee: Minnie Miñoso, with his wife speaking on his behalf — 2:32 p.m.

After playing three seasons with the New York Cubans in the Negro National League, Miñoso joined the Cleveland Indians in 1949 and became a nine-time MLB All-Star.

Miñoso batted .299 with 2,110 hits in his career and also earned three Gold Glove awards as a left fielder.

Second inductee: Bud Fowler, with Dave Winfield speaking on his behalf — 2:14 p.m.

Fowler was a trailblazer for the Black baseball community, playing for over two decades. He helped establish the Page Fence Giants, one of the great Black barnstorming teams, in 1894, and played a part in forming several other barnstorming teams during his life.

Fowler grew up in Cooperstown.

Dave Winfield will speak on Fowler’s behalf.

First inductee: Jim Kaat — 2:02 p.m.

The southpaw won 283 games in his 25-year career from 1959-83, which included stints with the Senators, Twins, White Sox, Phillies, Yankees and Cardinals.

Kaat eclipsed 20 wins in three different seasons and is 17th all-time with 625 career games started. He is a 16-time Gold Glove recipient and won a World Series with the Cardinals in 1982. — Ethan Fuller

Ortiz’s daughter, Alex, sings national anthem — 1:55 p.m.

Ortiz’s daughter, 21-year-old Alex Veda, was selected to perform the national anthem before the ceremony in Cooperstown.

“I’m so happy to have this opportunity,” she told the Globe earlier this month. “That’s the way our family works. If we have the ability to help each other, we do. There’s no shyness. To be there for my father means a lot to me.”

A rising senior at the prestigious Berklee College of Music, Veda is preparing for a career in music production but also has performed for years.

She chose Alex Veda as her professional name in part to distinguish herself from her famous father.

Veda sang the anthem at Fenway Park when she was 16 and has since performed at other venues, including a packed house at Amalie Arena before a Tampa Bay Lightning game.

“This is a huge opportunity for me as a performer and musician,” she said. “Anything you can do to get your name out there helps. I love collaborating with other people and producing. I’d rather be Dr. Dre than Beyoncé. But performing is something I still love.” — Peter Abraham

Big cheers for Pedro and Koufax — 1:48 p.m.

More than 50 Hall of Famers have returned, and Pedro Martinez got a rousing cheer from fans when he took the stage.

So did Sandy Koufax, the longest tenured living Hall of Famer.

The scene in Cooperstown — 1:42 p.m.

Brian Kenny, master of ceremonies, announces that there will be some shortened elements to today’s programming. There’s a threat of thunderstorms in Cooperstown.

The ceremony is underway — 1:35 p.m.

Jane Forbes Clark, the chairwoman of the Baseball Hall of Fame board of directors, has introduced Josh Rawitch, the president of the Hall.

David Ortiz gets a big cheer when mentioned.

Who’s in Cooperstown, and who’s not? — 1:20 p.m.

As of Saturday, 52 of the 75 living Hall of Famers are expected to attend the ceremony. Among them will be Red Sox icons Wade Boggs, Pedro Martinez, and Jim Rice.

Carl Yastrzemski, who turns 83 next month, had concerns about COVID-19 and decided to skip the ceremony. He plans to be at Fenway Park on Tuesday when the Red Sox recognize Ortiz.

Of special significance to Ortiz will be the presence of 84-year-old Juan Marichal, the first Dominican voted to the Hall of Fame. Ortiz will be the fourth.

The out-of-town visitors on Sunday will include Red Sox owners John Henry and Tom Werner, and a cadre of team executives. Former Sox players Johnny Damon, Mike Lowell, Trot Nixon, Dustin Pedroia, Jason Varitek, Tim Wakefield, and Kevin Youkilis — champions all — are here to support Ortiz.

Derek Jeter will miss the ceremony due to a COVID-19 issue.

— Peter Abraham

Fans make their way to Clark Sports Center as induction ceremony approaches — 1:17 p.m.

Waves of thousands made the pilgrimage across Cooperstown, basking and roasting in the upstate New York sun as they walked (no cars allowed!) from a small downtown village to the Hall of Fame induction ceremonies at the Clark Sports Center.

They wore the jerseys of heroes whose last names – Ortiz, Williams, Martínez – conjured not just players but moments in time, years of their lives, aspirations and dreams.

As David Ortiz took the stage in front of a jubilant throng, the enduring meaning of his history with the Red Sox was apparent. Yet while the day served as a celebration of his remarkable tenure with the club, it also served to amplify the forming questions about the future direction of the Red Sox and their identity.

For Ortiz, Boston became “a second home.” To Boston and the Red Sox, Ortiz became, in the words of CEO and president Sam Kennedy, “The most important player in the history of the Red Sox.” — Alex Speier

Who else is going into the Hall of Fame today? — 1:15 p.m.

By Ethan Fuller

The seven members of the Baseball Hall of Fame Class of 2022:

Bud Fowler (1858-1913)

Fowler was a trailblazer for the Black baseball community, playing for over two decades. He helped establish the Page Fence Giants, one of the great Black barnstorming teams, in 1894, and played a part in forming several other barnstorming teams during his life.

Gil Hodges (1924-1972)

Hodges played 16 seasons with the Brooklyn (later Los Angeles) Dodgers and two with the New York Mets. He finished his playing career as an eight-time All-Star, a three-time Gold Glove winner at first base, and a two-time World Series champion.

Hodges would later become a manager for nine seasons and won the 1969 World Series with the Mets.

Jim Kaat (1938- )

The southpaw won 283 games in his 25-year career from 1959-83, which included stints with the Senators, Twins, White Sox, Phillies, Yankees and Cardinals.

Kaat eclipsed 20 wins in three different seasons and is 17th all-time with 625 career games started. He is a 16-time Gold Glove recipient and won a World Series with the Cardinals in 1982.

Minnie Miñoso (1923-2015)

After playing three seasons with the New York Cubans in the Negro National League, Miñoso joined the Cleveland Indians in 1949 and became a nine-time MLB All-Star.

Miñoso batted .299 with 2,110 hits in his career and also earned three Gold Glove awards as a left fielder.

Tony Oliva (1938- )

Oliva batted .304 across his 15-year career with the Minnesota Twins. He earned three batting titles and led MLB in hits in five seasons.

Oliva was named American League rookie of the year in 1964 and had eight consecutive All-Star appearances from 1964-1971.

Buck O’Neil (1911-2006)

O’Neil played in the Negro Leagues for 10 seasons and joined the Chicago Cubs as a scout in 1955. Chicago promoted him to their coaching staff in 1962, making O’Neil the first Black coach in American League or National League history. He also led the creation of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum, established in 1990.

David Ortiz (1975- )

After spending six seasons with the Twins, Ortiz joined the Red Sox in 2003 and helped them win three World Series titles in his 14 years with the team. The 10-time All-Star won seven Silver Slugger awards and led the league in RBIs in three different seasons. Ortiz finished with 541 career home runs (17th all-time) and 1,192 extra-base hits (8th all-time).

You know who else is excited for David Ortiz’s induction? The people of Cooperstown. — 1:05 p.m.

In the eyes of voters, David Ortiz’s baseball credentials are Hall of Fame-worthy.

To the Village of Cooperstown, N.Y., Big Papi is a certifiable Pied Piper.

Legions of New England Ortiz fans will hit the road this weekend, filling the streets, stores and motels surrounding the tourism-dependent hamlet. In doing so, they’ll provide a Papi-sized economic relief package that is perfectly timed. It will mark the first “normal” Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum induction weekend since pre-pandemic 2019.

Read more here.

David Ortiz is joining a select club, and entry might get tougher — 12:50 p.m.

David Ortiz is set to be inducted into the Hall of Fame on Sunday, the only member of the seven-man class voted in by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America.

The BBWAA has elected only one candidate in the last two election cycles and could throw another shutout in the next one.

The controversial trio of Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, and Curt Schilling have fallen off the ballot after 10 years of being considered. The leading returning candidate is seven-time All-Star third baseman Scott Rolen, who has climbed from 10.2 percent to 63.2 percent in five years.

He jumped 10.3 percent in the last election and would need to exceed that to reach the 75 percent required for induction. Rolen has at least five more years on the ballot, so voters who have yet to come around on him won’t feel pressure to change their minds.

The top new candidates will be Carlos Beltrán, John Lackey, Francisco Rodriguez, and Jayson Werth. Beltrán is the only realistic choice of that group, but will have to overcome the stigma of his actions regarding the 2017 Astros’ sign-stealing scandal.

Read the rest of the story from Peter Abraham.

See photos from David Ortiz’s big weekend — 12:40 p.m.

The Globe’s Barry Chin is in Cooperstown to chronicle all the moments.

Barry Chin/Globe Staff

Take a look at his best photos here.

‘He’s my hero’: Boston’s Dominicans cheer David Ortiz’s entry into Hall — 12:20 p.m.

Freddy Cabral pointed out the window of his convenience store across Centre Street in Jamaica Plain.

“You see that car over there? He was parking over there.”

That’s how close, many years ago, Cabral got to the man whose photo sits above the window, watching over the store: Red Sox legend David Ortiz.

“He’s my hero,” he said.

Standing behind the counter Thursday at Freddy’s Market Bodega, with Latin music playing on the radio, Cabral said there’s a chance he might finally meet Ortiz this weekend. He and hundreds of other local Dominicans will travel to Cooperstown, N.Y., to watch Ortiz’s induction ceremony into the Baseball Hall of Fame on Sunday.

Read the full story here.

ARod and Big Papi? BFFs. — 12:05 p.m.

Boston fans who blanch at seeing the word “friendly” precede “rivalry” in any discussion of Red Sox-Yankees history might not want to learn this, but David Ortiz and Alex Rodriguez, who was traded to the Yankees in 2004 after nearly ending up with the Red Sox, remained tight even when the competition between their teams reached full boil nearly 20 years ago.

Read Chad Finn’s column on their friendship here.

Ortiz (left) and Rodriguez (right) pose with Juan Soto before a 2019 World Series game.Pablo Martinez Monsivais/Associated Press

Of course Ted Williams came up in conversation — 11:55 a.m.

On a day when the Hall of Fame will celebrate the induction of the most significant Red Sox player of the 21st century in David Ortiz, it will also welcome a pitcher who faced the greatest hitter in franchise history.

Lefthander Jim Kaat, elected to the Hall’s class of 2022 by the Golden Era committee, went 283-237 over a career that spanned 25 years with the Senators, Twins, White Sox, Phillies, Yankees, and Cardinals. The quarter-century arc of his career from 1959 to 1983 and his subsequent decades as a broadcaster have connected Kaat with several generations of players.

On Saturday, Kaat recalled facing Ted Williams at Fenway Park as a 20-year-old in his third big league game in 1959. He turned to second baseman John Schaive in awe.

“I said to Shaive, ‘I’m facing Ted Williams!’ " recalled Kaat. “He ripped one off the Monster against me.”

Read more from Alex Speier.

‘He’s the player who changed everything’ — 11:40 a.m.

We are all judged by individual accomplishments and the company we keep. No one more so than a professional athlete.

David Ortiz hit 541 regular-season home runs, won three World Series with the Red Sox, and was a 10-time All-Star. He’s one of only five players with at least 500 home runs and 600 doubles. Flip over his baseball card and the bold numbers tell the story of an extraordinary 20-year major league career.

The final validation will come Sunday when Ortiz is inducted into the Hall of Fame. Then, he will walk with legends.

As of Saturday, 52 of the 75 living Hall of Famers are expected to attend the ceremony. Among them will be Red Sox icons Wade Boggs, Pedro Martinez, and Jim Rice.

Of special significance to Ortiz will be the presence of 84-year-old Juan Marichal, the first Dominican voted to the Hall of Fame.

“I’m proud of David,” Marichal said. “It was not always easy for him. But he showed determination. I’m glad to be here to see this for him.”

“We had a lot of battles,” said Mariano Rivera, the brilliant Yankees closer who was a unanimous choice to the Hall in 2019. “He deserves to be here.”

Read more on the vibe in Cooperstown from Peter Abraham.

Long drives to Cooperstown — 11:25 a.m.

David Ortiz hit home runs against all 30 major league teams.John Hancock/Globe Staff

When you think of David Ortiz, it’s probably about a ball sailing over the fence. After all, he did it 558 times.

Big Papi hit 541 regular-season home runs, 17th in major league history. He added 17 more in the postseason, including some of the most memorable blasts that ever sailed into an October night.

Only four players — Ortiz, Reggie Jackson, Mickey Mantle, and Babe Ruth — share the distinction of hitting at least 500 homers, winning at least three World Series championships, and being inducted into the Hall of Fame.

“His power was legit,” Jackson said last fall during the World Series. “When David hit one, you knew it was going to go.”

That immense power is one of the reasons Ortiz is being inducted into the Hall of Fame on Sunday in Cooperstown, N.Y. He’ll also be one of the few Hall of Famers who played primarily as a designated hitter. Ortiz made 87.8 percent of his plate appearances as a DH, the most among Hall of Famers.

We created a special interactive so you can explore each one of Ortiz’s homers. Check it out here.

The business of being Big Papi — 11:15 a.m.

The business of being David Ortiz was flourishing before his election to the Baseball Hall of Fame on the first ballot.

Now, it’s boom time.

Since the announcement in January, Ortiz’s appearance and signing fees have jumped 20 to 35 percent, his list of regional and national endorsement partners has grown to 10, his licensing deals to eight, and he has a long-term contract with Fox Sports and Fox Bet that ensures Big Papi’s booming laugh, sartorial flair, and baseball insights will be seen and heard from coast to coast, especially in New England, for years to come.

“It’s a validation, a first-ballot Hall of Famer — rhetorically, what better description can one give that’s better than that?” said Alex Radetsky, president of Radegen, the sports and entertainment agency he founded, with Ortiz as one of his first two clients, in 2010. “Now it’s just up to David on how much he wants to do. He could continue at a very high level of being front and center like Charles Barkley and Shaq [O’Neal] are in the NBA, and some NFL names. He’ll have to work, but the opportunities will be there.”

Read more from Michael Silverman here.


Katie McInerney can be reached at katie.mcinerney@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter at @k8tmac. Alex Speier can be reached at alex.speier@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter at @alexspeier. Peter Abraham can be reached at peter.abraham@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @PeteAbe.