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Globe Magazine

The 23 best photos of 2022 from Boston Globe photographers

Globe staff

In this edition of the annual Globe Magazine feature, staff photographers share the stories behind the most unforgettable images they took in 2022, which range from heartbreaking to heartwarming. Close to home, they chronicled everything from the opioid epidemic on the streets near Mass. and Cass in Boston to recreational tree climbing in Carlisle. And this year, some Globe photographers ventured to the four corners of the country for the Two Weeks in America project, as well as to Ukraine to report on how people are are trying to survive in a nation under siege.


Erin Clark/Globe Staff

1. SEPTEMBER 9 / Miami, Texas — Beck Booze (above) is an icon. What more is there to say? I didn’t have to do much to make this photo. Witnessing the 2-year-old perched atop his horse with the ease of an old cowboy was a sight to behold. –Erin Clark



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Erin Clark/Globe Staff

2. JULY 3 / Hlybochok, Ukraine — I saw the light filtering in through the door of the community building at this Ukrainian summer camp, then housing nearly 100 refugees, and knew I wanted to make a photo. I stood nearby, waiting. Soon, the children started playing tag and running in and out. I loved this girl’s blue hair clip against the vibrant blue of the door and the contrast of her bright yellow shoes. –Erin Clark



Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

3. NOVEMBER 8 / East Boston — It was Election Night and I needed a quiet place to remotely file the day’s assignments so I drove over to Piers Park. As I pulled in, I caught a glimpse of a girl in a red dress walking away. Fatima Lemus was with her mom and a photographer having her quinceañera portraits taken. I asked if it would be OK if I tagged along and they were all kind enough to say yes. I photographed them for a bit then returned to my car to file. Eventually I looked up from my laptop, saw the sunset, and grabbed my cameras. When I came over the hill and saw Fatima standing atop the cement pillar I audibly gasped — it was such a stunning sight. It’s almost always when you least expect it that you stumble upon a magical scene like this one. –Jessica Rinaldi

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Erin Clark/Globe Staff

4. SEPTEMBER 10 / Miami, Texas — When I heard that 8-year-old Callie John Calvert was the only girl on her football team, I knew I needed to photograph one of her games. I wanted to capture her ferocity. When she joined the huddle and let out her battle cry, I knew I had the shot. –Erin Clark



Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff

5. MAY 10 / Boston — I was working on a story about the opioid crisis in Boston. I had spent a few hours in the area around Massachusetts Avenue and Melnea Cass Boulevard earlier that day, then decided to step back for a while. When I returned I literally walked into this situation. A gentleman had overdosed; he was flat on his back, unresponsive, and a pair of outreach workers began resuscitating him while friends and onlookers were praying for him. Narcan was administered, a life was saved — all in just under a minute. The whole situation breaks my heart. Addiction is ruthless. But on this day I saw a win, a life saved . . . a glimpse of hope. -Craig F. Walker

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John Tlumacki/Globe Staff

6. SEPTEMBER 7 / Dorchester — On September 7, Celebrity Cuts Barbershop in Dorchester gave free haircuts to children for the start of the school year. I photographed Herman Maxwell Hylton skillfully cutting the hair of Rafael Reed, 6, as he sat in Hylton’s chair wrapped in a bright green apron. On October 26, Hylton was shot to death while at work. When I photographed the scene, I was shocked to see the same green apron covering a pool of Hylton’s blood on the floor. –John Tlumacki



David L. Ryan/Globe Staff

7. JANUARY 31 / Truro — An aerial view of a home on pilings at the edge due to erosion by the ocean. –David L. Ryan



Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

8. SEPTEMBER 13 / Sheridan, Wyoming — While we were on the road for the Globe’s Two Weeks in America project, writer Jenna Russell and I drove to Sheridan to reunite with our teammate Hanna Krueger. We didn’t know what Sheridan would hold, but we stumbled upon an amazing Western town with a watering hole called The Mint Bar. The owner’s stepdaughter was there celebrating her 21st birthday and her dog, Sadie, had the run of the place. It was this moment with Sadie that stood out. -Jessica Rinaldi



Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

9. MAY 22 / Lawrence — Jazzy Roulhac was nine months’ pregnant when I photographed her for a story by Jeneé Osterheldt. It was only eight days after a mass shooter had walked into a Buffalo supermarket and targeted and killed Black people; we were still in the midst of the pandemic; there was a baby formula shortage. It was a lot for anyone, let alone someone who was about to bring a new life into the world. I had that in the back of my mind when I met Jazzy and we talked for a while before I took any photos. The best portraits I have made have always felt like ones I shouldn’t put my byline on because so much of what made them great was a result of the person in the frame. That was how this photograph felt to me. -Jessica Rinaldi

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Barry Chin/Globe Staff

10. AUGUST 20 / Providence — Rhode Island state Representative David Morales, now 24, is a legislator by day and a wrestling villain by night. He is also the commissioner of the Renegade Wrestling Alliance in Providence. What I didn’t expect was the level of athleticism exhibited by the participants — here, Morales is body-slammed into the mat during one of the bouts. It might not have been pure wrestling, but it was definitely professional and, dare I say it, somewhat artistically produced mayhem on a mat. A fun night of entertainment for the whole family and even a veteran sports photographer like me. -Barry Chin



Lane Turner/Globe Staff

11. NOVEMBER 2 / Providence — Downtown Providence displays so many fantastic, massive murals in prominent places thanks to the group The Avenue Concept. It’s a joy to walk around there. I saw this work, Salt Water, by artist Georgie Nakima — who’s also known as Garden of Journey — reflected on a car’s hood and windscreen while I was on my way to an assignment. I just needed a human presence to animate the frame, and waited only a few minutes until someone walked into the picture. -Lane Turner

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Erin Clark / Globe Staff

12. JULY 12 / Oberammergau, Germany — Frederik Mayet plays the role of Jesus in Oberammergau’s Passion Play in Germany. I wanted to capture him as he prepared for the scene where he would be hung from the cross. After his makeup was applied, he had a few minutes before he had to be out on stage, and he casually leaned against the cross as it rested on its side in the hallway. I thought the juxtaposition between Frederik’s relaxed demeanor and the cross upon which he was about to be hung was just fascinating. -Erin Clark



Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff

13. SEPTEMBER 9 / West Greenwich, Rhode Island — This is one of the most emotionally and technically difficult photographs I’ve ever made. Through no fault of their own, Holly, her husband, and their four children have been homeless for six months. They were living in a tent in a campground and having a very rough time of it. I hurt for them, but I had to wall off my emotions and focus on the photograph. The difference of the light from the cellphone on Holly’s daughter Andrea, to the medium light on Holly, and then the dark woods meant I had to constantly change the settings in my camera and pray the right combination happened at the right moment. If I got it right, I knew this image would resonate with anyone with a beating heart. -Suzanne Kreiter



Jonathan Wiggs/Globe Staff

14. APRIL 5 / Scituate — What stood out to me when I saw the swan on a pond in Scituate was the early morning light. As I drove by the scene, I decided quickly to make a U-turn. I grabbed a camera and started to shoot as the swan made its way across the pond. Photographers live for great light and I was lucky to catch the moment. -Jonathan Wiggs



John Tlumacki/Globe Staff

15. NOVEMBER 11 / Medway — In the thousands of photo assignments that I have shot for the Globe, I never had someone answer their front door wearing just a bathing suit. Bill Purnell brought me to his backyard dunk tank where he proceeded to dump 10 bags of ice inside. He coaches people in frigid plunges, which he credits with losing 35 pounds. When he completely immersed himself, he looked like he was stuffed into a picture frame. I became a bit alarmed when he took his time resurfacing. -John Tlumacki



Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

16. MAY 17 / Lawrence — State Senator Sonia Chang-Díaz was in Lawrence as part of her campaign for governor and stopped into Mercy Beauty Center & Spa. When she walked in I spotted the bank of dryers and imagined what an incredible photo it would be if she got under them. But, as expected, she walked right past them to chat with customers, and then held court for a bit, taking questions in Spanish and English. When she was done I figured that was it. To my utter amazement when she got to the dryers she slipped in between two customers and made herself right at home. -Jessica Rinaldi



Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff

17. SEPTEMBER 13 / Marianna, Arkansas — I was fortunate to work on the Two Weeks in America project, which brought me to parts of the country I’d never seen, including Marianna. Writer Mark Shanahan was dialed in to visit Jones’ Bar-B-Q Diner, which in 2012 won the first James Beard Award in Arkansas history. Mark’s hunch was right: Ten years later the restaurant and menu are still simple — just chopped pork on white bread—but melt-in-your-mouth awesome. The people were kind and welcoming, including customers Marcus Isom (left) and his father, Melvin. If you find yourself hungry in east Arkansas, this is the place. -Craig F. Walker



Stan Grossfeld/Globe Staff

18. MARCH 13 / Worcester — This is another world: 800 student-athletes competing in a high school state championship and they leave it all on the mats. Teams actually cheer for each other and the athleticism is off the charts. Most photographers are trying to capture the perfect pyramid. It is more fun to just slap on a telephoto lens, head up to the second floor, and watch what happens when the pyramids tumble. Everybody must do their part so that the people on the top don’t hit the mat. That is the essence of teamwork and trust. -Stan Grossfeld



Jim Davis/Globe Staff

19. APRIL 17 / Boston — The Celtics and Nets were playing the first game of the first round of the playoffs at TD Garden, and Boston was trailing by 1 point in the final seconds. Jayson Tatum (right) scored as the buzzer sounded to give his team a victory. Tatum and the crowd erupted, a standard celebration photo. But having Brooklyn’s Kyrie Irving (left) looking stunned in the frame made it a much better storytelling photo. -Jim Davis



Matthew J Lee/Globe staff

20. MARCH 16 / Quincy — Norwood High had had an undefeated season coming into this game and Whitman-Hanson had never advanced to a semifinal. Since it was a close game, the emotions were magnified. As Norwood players celebrated their victory, I tried to position myself to capture the emotion of winning and dejection of losing. I was fortunate to have a player from Whitman-Hanson walk through my viewfinder to complete my task. -Matthew J. Lee



Carlin Stiehl for The Boston Globe

21. NOVEMBER 18 / Cambridge — I set off to photograph a pair of students who were attempting to get Harvard University to adopt the turkey as its new mascot. If you’re a photographer, then you’ve probably had a thought like, If only this would happen, it would really make the photo. Well, for me, it was when a student passing by shouted “Turkeys!” pointing at the mascots, and then “Turkey!” pointing at this real turkey. -Carlin Stiehl


Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff

22. JUNE 28 / Boston — It was the annual Senior LGBTQ+ Pride luncheon. While people ate, I roamed through the lobby exhibit waiting for something to photograph. Hearing the DJ cue up his music, I rushed back into the function room. I started shooting from the periphery and then moved carefully, stealth-like, into the fray, trying to avoid arms jerking to the blasting sounds. While I tried to get a cross section of the dance moves, I kept coming back to the stylings of Cassandra Cato-Louis. Other dancers seemed to appreciate her talent. With the flowing pride dress and glasses, her attitude screamed “enjoying life” and “happy to be here!” -Pat Greenhouse



Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

23. AUGUST 15 / Carlisle — I always love assignments for stories by Billy Baker because it usually means there’s going to be some sort of wild adventure involved. In this case, said adventure was recreational tree climbing, something Billy had attempted but failed to do — succumbing to fear of heights. A writer can use that sort of vulnerability to their advantage to write a great story, but a photographer doesn’t really have that option. Either you climb the tree or you don’t have any photos. I had a blast climbing with Andrew Joslin and his crew and when I got down I could see how high up we had been. -Jessica Rinaldi