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COOKING | MAGAZINE

Three perfect omelet recipes to get your day started right

The cooks from Milk Street offer tips for making perfect omelets.

Herbed Omelet With Tomatoes and Blue CheeseConnie Miller/of CB Creatives

We love the speed and simplicity of omelets, but they can be fussy and easy to overcook. Our solution? Pull them off the heat before they are fully cooked and let them finish in the pan’s residual warmth before folding them over. We use that process with our Gruyère and Chive Omelet, which we stuff with buttery croutons spiked with white wine and mustard. Try an herbaceous version with thyme mixed into the eggs, and filled with tomatoes and creamy blue cheese. Or, skip the folding altogether, as in our take on Persian kuku sabzi, a frittata-like omelet seasoned with turmeric, paprika, dried mint, and lemon zest.

Herbed Omelet With Tomatoes and Blue Cheese

Makes 4 servings

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Sautéed shallots and tangy-sweet grape tomatoes fill this flavorful omelet, along with a scattering of rich, creamy blue cheese. If blue cheese is too pungent for your taste, substitute an equal amount of feta.

Don’t be afraid to use the tender tips of thyme sprigs. Though the woody parts of the stems are too tough and fibrous to chop (only the leaves are usable), the soft, flexible tips can be chopped up with the leaves. The flowers are usable, too.

8 large eggs

1 tablespoon fresh thyme, finely chopped

Kosher salt and ground black pepper

3 tablespoons salted butter, divided

3 medium shallots, halved and thinly sliced

1 pint grape or cherry tomatoes, halved

2 ounces blue cheese, crumbled (½ cup)

2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives (½-inch pieces)

In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, thyme, and 1 teaspoon salt, then set aside. In a 12-inch nonstick skillet set over medium heat, melt 1 tablespoon of the butter. Add the shallots, ½ teaspoon salt, and ¾ teaspoon pepper. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the shallots are lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until they have softened and started to brown, 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl and wipe out the pan.

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In the same skillet over medium heat, melt the remaining 2 tablespoons butter, then swirl the pan to coat. Pour in the egg mixture and, using a silicone spatula, draw the edges toward the center and gently stir, working your way around the perimeter of the pan. Cook the eggs this way until they form soft, pillowy curds but are still runny enough to pool on the surface, 1 to 2 minutes. Spread the eggs in an even layer, then cover, remove from the heat, and let stand until the omelet is set, about 5 minutes.

Run the spatula around the edge and under the omelet to loosen it, then slide it onto a plate. Scatter the tomato mixture over one half of the omelet, then top with the blue cheese and chives. Using the spatula, fold the omelet in half to enclose the filling, then cut into 4 wedges.

Gruyère and Chive OmeletConnie Miller/of CB Creatives

Gruyère and Chive Omelet

Makes 4 servings

This unusual Gruyère and chive omelet — our adaptation of a recipe from The Zuni Café Cookbook by Judy Rodgers — pairs crisp, buttery croutons with soft, creamy eggs. The Gruyère adds a touch of funkiness, while the mustard and chives brighten the dish. Offer a green salad to complete the meal.

Be sure not to let the butter brown before pouring in the eggs; this means that the skillet is too hot, which will cause the omelet to overbrown on the bottom. The goal is a pale golden exterior.

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8 large eggs

4 tablespoons finely chopped fresh chives, divided

Kosher salt and ground black pepper

6 tablespoons (¾ stick) salted butter, divided

1/3 cup dry white wine

¼ cup whole-grain mustard

2 ounces crusty white bread, torn into rough ½-inch pieces (2 cups)

4 ounces (1 cup) shredded Gruyère cheese

In a medium bowl, whisk the eggs, 2 tablespoons of the chives, and ½ teaspoon each salt and pepper.

In a 12-inch nonstick skillet set over medium heat, melt 4 tablespoons of the butter. Add the wine and mustard and stir to combine. Bring to a simmer and cook until the liquid has evaporated and the mixture begins to sizzle, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a medium bowl, add the bread, and toss to coat. Set the skillet back over medium heat, then add the seasoned bread and cook, stirring, until golden brown and crisp, 3 to 4 minutes. Transfer to a plate and set aside. Wipe out the skillet.

Set the skillet over medium-high heat and add the remaining 2 tablespoons butter. When the butter has melted, swirl the pan to coat. Pour in the egg mixture and, using a silicone spatula, draw the edges toward the center and gently stir, working your way around the perimeter of the pan. Cook the eggs this way until they form soft, creamy curds on top and the bottom has set but not browned, about 1 minute. Off heat, scatter the cheese over the omelet, cover, and let stand until the cheese has melted and the surface of the omelet is set, about 3 minutes.

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Run the spatula around the edge and underneath the omelet to loosen, then slide onto a cutting board. Scatter the toasted bread over half of the omelet and, using the spatula, fold it in half to enclose the bread. Cut the omelet into 4 wedges and sprinkle with the remaining 2 tablespoons chives.

Baked Persian Cauliflower OmeletConnie Miller/of CB Creatives

Baked Persian Cauliflower Omelet

Makes 4 servings

Kuku sabzi is a Persian frittata that’s customarily flavored with an abundance of fresh herbs. In this version, we add sweet, buttery cauliflower, along with onion and garlic. A few earthy spices add depth of flavor and lemon zest lends brightness. A small amount of flour helps keep the eggs tender, and baking powder provides lift.

To prevent the flour from clumping, mix it with the seasonings before adding it to the eggs. When removing the skillet from the oven, don’t forget that the handle will be hot.

1 tablespoon grape-seed or other neutral oil

1 medium yellow onion, chopped

3 medium garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 small (about 2 pound) head of cauliflower, trimmed, cored, and cut into 1-inch florets

1 tablespoon all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons ground turmeric

2 teaspoons sweet paprika

1 teaspoon baking powder

¾ teaspoon dried mint

Kosher salt and ground black pepper

5 large eggs

1 teaspoon grated lemon zest

Heat the oven to 350 degrees with a rack in the middle position. In a 10-inch nonstick oven-safe skillet set over medium heat, warm the oil until it shimmers. Add the onion and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion begins to soften, 3 to 5 minutes. Stir in the cauliflower and 2 tablespoons water, then cover and cook, stirring once or twice, until the cauliflower begins to soften, about 5 minutes.

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Uncover and continue to cook, stirring once or twice, until the vegetables are lightly browned and a skewer inserted at the stem of the largest cauliflower floret meets only slight resistance, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer to a medium bowl and set aside; reserve the pan.

In another medium bowl, whisk together the flour, turmeric, paprika, baking powder, mint, 2 teaspoons salt, and 1 teaspoon pepper. Whisk in the eggs and lemon zest. Add to the still-warm vegetables and fold well with a silicone spatula. Pour into the skillet and distribute in an even layer. Bake until the eggs are set on top, about 30 minutes.

Carefully remove the pan from the oven (the handle will be hot). Run the spatula around the edge and under the omelet to loosen, then slide onto a serving plate. Serve warm or at room temperature.


Christopher Kimball is the founder of Milk Street, home to a magazine, school, and radio and television shows. Globe readers get 12 weeks of complete digital access, plus two issues of Milk Street print magazine, for just $1. Go to 177milkstreet.com/globe. Send comments to magazine@globe.com.