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House Speaker

Mike Johnson was elected House speaker after weeks without a leader. Here’s how it all unfolded.

Newly elected House Speaker Mike Johnson was sworn in at the Capitol on Wednesday.TOM BRENNER/AFP via Getty Images

The House finally has a speaker again.

After three replacement speaker nominees failed to win the job, Republicans on Wednesday afternoon elected Louisiana Representative Mike Johnson, elevating a lesser-known conservative lawmaker and a key player in Donald Trump’s attempt to overturn the 2020 election.

The vote to elect Johnson ends weeks of chaos in the chamber after former House speaker Kevin McCarthy’s ouster earlier this month.

Here’s a look at how the scramble to elect a House speaker unfolded.

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October 25, 2023

 

House is back from recess to consider resolution supporting Israel — 3:36 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

The House went into recess after Johnson was sworn in as speaker, but they reconvened Wednesday afternoon to consider a House resolution in support of Israel in the war against Hamas.


Biden releases statement on Johnson’s speaker election — 3:30 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

In a statement Wednesday afternoon, President Biden congratulated Johnson on his election as speaker, pledged to work him, and addressed the need to avoid a government shutdown in a few weeks.

“We need to move swiftly to address our national security needs and to avoid a shutdown in 22 days,” Biden said in the statement. “Even though we have real disagreements about important issues, there should be mutual effort to find common ground wherever we can. This is a time for all of us to act responsibly, and to put the good of the American people and the everyday priorities of American families above any partisanship.”


R.I. congressional delegation reacts to choice of Johnson as House speaker — 3:16 p.m.

By Edward Fitzpatrick, Globe Staff

Candidates for Rhode Island’s vacant congressional seat and the state’s one current House member on Wednesday reacted to Johnson’s election.

Representative Seth Magaziner, a Democrat elected last year to represent Rhode Island’s Second Congressional District, blasted the choice.

”Unfortunately, rather than choosing bipartisanship, House Republicans have instead doubled down on extremism,” Magaziner said. “They have selected a speaker in Mike Johnson who supports a nationwide abortion ban, cutting Social Security and Medicare, and plotted to overturn the results of a free and fair election when his candidate did not win.”

Gerry W. Leonard Jr., the Republican candidate for the vacant First Congressional District seat, said, “We must end this gridlock. The election of a speaker should be a step towards that goal. I do not know Speaker Johnson, but I urge him to stand up to extremes and put principles over politics.”

Gabe Amo, the Democratic candidate for the congressional seat the Democrat David N. Cicilline vacated on June 1 to lead the Rhode Island Foundation, said he hopes Johnson will try to govern in a bipartisan way. But, he said, “It is extremely disturbing that the consensus choice for House Republicans is an election denier, a supporter of a nationwide abortion ban, and an opponent of gay marriage — to name just a few of his extreme positions.”


Johnson is officially sworn in as House speaker — 2:47 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Johnson took the oath of office and was officially sworn in as the speaker of the House.

Representative Hal Rogers of Kentucky administered the oath.


How Mass. lawmakers are reacting to Johnson’s election — 2:45 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff


Johnson is ‘absolutely unfit to serve’ as speaker, Pressley says — 2:40 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Massachusetts Representative Ayanna Pressley said shortly after Johnson’s election that he is “absolutely unfit to serve as Speaker,” calling him a “Trump pawn who worked to overturn the 2020 election.”

“Johnson is also one of the most egregious anti-abortion extremists in Congress and he has written bills that are outright attacks on our LGBTQ+ siblings,” Pressley said in a statement.

“His presence in Congress is a threat to our democracy, and the consequences of him wielding the Speaker’s gavel will be dire. He is both ineffective and harmful, the worst kind of paradox. He will only perpetuate and accelerate the cruelty, chaos, and confusion we have seen under this Republican majority,” she wrote.


In a statement, Johnson says it’s ‘the honor of a lifetime’ to be elected speaker — 2:29 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Johnson took to X after he was elected House speaker, calling the role “the honor of a lifetime.”

“It has been an arduous few weeks, and a reminder that the House is as complicated and diverse as the people we represent,” his statement said. “The urgency of this moment demands bold, decisive action to restore trust, advance our legislative priorities, and demonstrate good governance. Our House Republican Conference is united, and eager to work.”


Johnson is speaking now — 2:25 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Johnson, freshly elected speaker, is addressing lawmakers from the House floor now.

He began by thanking Jeffries and pledging to find common ground with the Democrat. He also thanked McCarthy for his leadership, saying the former speaker “is the reason we are in the majority today.”

Watch it live.


Watch the moment Johnson was elected speaker — 2:20 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff


Jeffries is speaking on the House floor — 2:06 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Jeffries is addressing House lawmakers after Johnson was elected speaker. Watch it live.


The final tally — 1:58 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Johnson received 220 votes and Jeffries received 209 votes. There were no votes for other candidates, unlike previous rounds of House speaker elections.


Johnson is elected speaker — 1:54 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

The House finally has a speaker again.

After three replacement speaker nominees failed to win the job, Republicans on Wednesday afternoon elected Louisiana Representative Mike Johnson, elevating a lesser-known conservative lawmaker and a key player in Donald Trump’s attempt to overturn the 2020 election.

The vote to elect Johnson ends weeks of chaos in the chamber after former House speaker Kevin McCarthy’s ouster earlier this month.

Johnson received 220 votes and Jeffries received 209 votes. There were no votes for other candidates, unlike previous rounds of House speaker elections.


Republicans cheer after Johnson reaches 215 votes — 1:49 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Johnson reached 215 Republican votes, and applause erupted from House Republicans.

It appears he was the unanimous choice of House Republicans, though an official tally hasn’t been confirmed.


Another round of applause for a former speaker nominee — 1:39 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Another round of applause broke out when Scalise, a former speaker nominee, voted for Johnson as House speaker.

With more than 300 lawmakers voting, Johnson is still the unanimous choice of House Republicans.


Still no defections from either party — 1:25 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

With more than 200 lawmakers voting, there are still no defections from either Republicans or Democrats.


Applause erupts when Emmer votes for Johnson — 1:18 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Republicans stood and applauded after Tom Emmer, the most recent speaker nominee who withdrew Tuesday afternoon, voted for Johnson.

Representative Tom Emmer was acknowledged as he voted for Representative Mike Johnson for House speaker.HAIYUN JIANG/NYT

So far, no defections — 1:12 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

More than 60 lawmakers have voted, and so far, both Republicans and Democrats have voted unanimously for their parties’ nominees.

It’s the first time we’ve made it this far into the alphabet without defections this Congress.


Voting is underway — 1:07 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Voting has begun in the latest attempt to elect a House speaker. Watch the vote live.


Aguilar nominates Jeffries — 1:03 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Representative Pete Aguilar of California is nominating Jeffries.

“We have been left wondering if Republicans were truly intent on solving our issues, reopening the House of Representatives, and rallying around someone to lead this chamber,” Aguilar said. “Or has this been about something else? Has this been about a focus of House Republicans to find the person who can pass their extreme litmus test to oppose marriage equality, enact a nationwide abortion ban without exceptions, gut Social Security and Medicare, and support overturning a free and fair election?”

To jeers from Republicans, Aguilar said “it’s a fair question,” and Democrats applauded.

Aguilar called out Johnson’s role in supporting a legal effort that tried to overturn the results of the 2020 election.

House Democratic Caucus Chair Pete Aguilar delivered the nominating speech for House Minority Leader Hakeem Jeffries as the House of Representatives held an election for a new speaker of the House.Alex Wong/Getty

Stefanik nominates Johnson — 12:53 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

New York Representative Elise Stefanik is nominating Johnson for House speaker, prompting a long round of applause and cheers from Republicans.

Stefanik said “today is the day” Republicans elect Johnson as speaker, calling him a man of deep faith, a deeply respected constitutional lawyer, and a “titan” on the Judiciary Committee.


Trump weighs in on Johnson as speaker — 12:14 p.m.

By the Associated Press

“I think he’s gonna be a fantastic speaker,” Trump said Wednesday at the New York courthouse where the former president, who is now the Republican frontrunner for president in 2024, is on trial over charges of business fraud.

As the House convened at noon, Johnson, who won the GOP majority behind closed doors, still needed all Republicans in the public roll call to win the gavel.

Trump said he hadn’t heard “one negative comment about him. Everybody likes him.”


House convenes for speaker vote — 12:03 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

The House is meeting now ahead of a vote to elect a speaker.

After the Pledge of Allegiance and a prayer, the House is holding a quorum call. Then there will be nominating speeches and a vote.


Lawmakers set to reconvene soon. Watch it live. — 11:50 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

The House is set to meet shortly to try to elect a speaker. Watch it live.


Democrats on Johnson: ‘same extremist menu, new waiter’ — 11:25 a.m.

By Tal Kopan, Globe Staff

Democrats on Wednesday morning were unimpressed with Republicans’ latest nominee for speaker, calling Johnson a new variety of the same Trump-inspired policies they’ve seen from Republicans all along.

They noted Johnson’s role in crafting legal arguments to overturn the 2020 election and his hard-right views on abortion and LGBTQ rights.

Representative Katherine Clark, a Revere Democrat and the House minority whip, cited her colleague from Worcester in describing Johnson.

”They are making a choice to double down on MAGA extremism,” Clark said of the GOP. “It’s as Jim McGovern said, same extremist menu, new waiter.”

Maryland Democrat Representative Jamie Raskin, a constitutional law professor who is one of the party’s top voices on issues of democracy and the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection, said Johnson was similar to a previous speaker nominee Jordan, who was in close contact with Trump during that day.

”He’s just like Jim Jordan who’s taken the Bar,” Raskin said. “He’s an insurrectionist, Esq.”


Abortion, LGBTQ rights, Ukraine aid: What to know about Johnson’s political views — 10:50 a.m.

By The Washington Post

Johnson, who serves on the House Armed Services Committee, was one of 57 lawmakers — all of them Republicans — who voted against a $39.8 billion aid package for Ukraine in May. He opposes abortion and has celebrated the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade

Here’s what to know about his political views.


Asked about his election denying activity after he was nominated, Johnson says ‘next question’ — 10:14 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

After his nomination on Tuesday night, a reporter asked Johnson about his efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election. The question was met with boos from members of the Republican conference who joined his appearance. Representative Virginia Foxx of North Carolina appeared to tell the reporter to “shut up.”

Representative Mike Johnson spoke after he was chosen as the Republicans' latest nominee for House speaker on Tuesday. Jose Luis Magana/Associated Press

Johnson voted against certifying 2020 election results — 9:38 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

In January 2021, Johnson was among more than 100 House Republicans who voted against certifying President Biden’s Electoral College victory.

Johnson voted to object to the election results in Arizona and Pennsylvania.


Johnson was lead organizer of an amicus brief supporting Texas lawsuit asking Supreme Court to intervene in 2020 election — 9:04 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Johnson was the lead organizer of an amicus brief that was signed by 125 other House Republicans supporting a lawsuit filed by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton that tried to invalidate electoral votes that Biden won in key swing states. The lawsuit asked the Supreme Court to intervene in the vote counting.

The Supreme Court dismissed the lawsuit in December 2020.


House to convene Wednesday afternoon for expected speaker vote — 8:33 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

House lawmakers will try again on Wednesday afternoon to elect a House speaker, as the chamber remains leaderless and Republicans attempt to unite behind their fourth nominee since McCarthy was ousted earlier this month.


 

October 24, 2023

 

Watch: Johnson speaks after his nomination — 11:00 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff


Republicans nominate Mike Johnson for House speaker — 9:45 p.m.

By the Associated Press

Republicans chose Representative Mike Johnson as their latest nominee for House speaker desperate to unite their fractious majority and end the chaos, just hours after an earlier pick abruptly withdrew in the face of opposition from Donald Trump.

Johnson of Louisiana, a lower-ranked member of the House GOP leadership team, becomes the fourth Republican nominee in what has become an almost absurd cycle of political infighting since Kevin McCarthy’s ouster as GOP factions jockey for power.


Emmer reportedly withdraws as speaker nominee — 4:40 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Emmer reportedly withdrew his nomination for House speaker on Tuesday afternoon, the third nominee to fail in a matter of weeks after McCarthy was ousted.

Emmer’s candidacy was imperiled after hard-liners declined to support him and Trump released a statement warning Republicans that electing him would be a “tragic mistake.”

The Washington Post, The New York Times, and CNN all reported that Emmer’s bid had come to an end.


Republicans are reconvening shortly — 3:50 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

House Republicans are set to reconvene in a few minutes after they took a break earlier in the afternoon.


Rosendale says Emmer ‘no longer has a path to secure 217 votes’ — 3:44 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Representative Matt Rosendale of Montana said on X that while Emmer secured the nomination earlier Tuesday, he “no longer has a path to secure 217 votes.”

“It’s time to get back in the room and give Kevin Hern and Mike Johnson an opportunity to get to 217!” Rosendale wrote.

Johnson and Emmer were the two candidates remaining in the race for the nomination until Emmer prevailed, and Hern was among the final four nominee candidates.


Emmer can only afford to lose a few Republican votes — 3:06 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

With Republicans controlling the House 221-212 over Democrats, any GOP nominee can afford just a few detractors.

“It’s going to be another close race by the time we get to one,” said Representative Kelly Armstrong of North Dakota. “I think it would behoove whoever wins this to stay in the room and figure where they are at and whether they can get there.”


Trump slams Emmer in social media post — 2:38 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Trump took to his Truth Social platform on Tuesday to warn Republicans against electing Emmer as House speaker, saying he is out of touch with Republican voters.

“Voting for a Globalist RINO like Tom Emmer would be a tragic mistake!” Trump wrote.


What Republican holdouts are saying about Emmer — 2:17 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Some lawmakers explained to Capitol Hill reporters their opposition to Emmer as House speaker.

Representative Mike Collins, of Georgia, said he’s “just not there yet.” Representative Jim Banks of Indiana said he “can’t go along with putting one of the most moderate members of the entire Republican conference in the speaker’s chair.” And Representative Eli Crane of Arizona said his constituents want an outsider speaker candidate who hasn’t served in leadership.


Republicans take a break as Emmer meets with holdouts — 2:01 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Republicans are breaking until 4 p.m. while Emmer meets with the lawmakers who are so far declining to back him, according to reporters.


What’s next in the process? — 1:52 p.m.

By the Associated Press

After the Republican conference nominated a speaker — again — a House floor vote would be the final step.

The speaker is normally elected every two years, in January, when the House organizes for a new session. A new election can be held if the speaker dies, resigns or is removed from office. This is the first time an election is being held after the removal of a speaker.

Once the House is in a quorum — meaning the minimum number of members are present to proceed — each party puts a name into nomination for speaker. Democrats will nominate their current leader, Jeffries, and vote for him.

Once the roll call for speaker begins, members are called on individually and each shouts out their choice. The candidate to become speaker needs a majority of the votes from House members who are present and voting. The House will vote as many times as necessary until someone reaches that threshold.


These lawmakers reportedly didn’t vote for Emmer — 1:30 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Here’s a look at the lawmakers who either voted present or for Jordan during the roll call vote, according to reporters.


26 Republicans decline to back Emmer in a roll call vote — 1:05 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

According to Jake Sherman of Punchbowl News, 26 Republicans declined to back Emmer in a roll call vote.

A number of those votes were for Jordan, according to Annie Grayer of CNN.


Emmer baselessly said there were ‘questionable election practices’ in 2020 election — 12:52 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

In the wake of the 2020 election, Emmer baselessly said there were “questionable election practices” in the election and signed an amicus brief supporting a lawsuit filed by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton that tried to invalidate electoral votes that Biden won in key swing states. That lawsuit was dismissed by the Supreme Court in December 2020.

Emmer voted to certify the results on Jan. 6, 2021.

According to CNN, which reviewed Emmer’s comments in the aftermath of the 2020 election, Emmer refused to say that Biden won the election and criticized the media for calling the race for Biden.


What to know about Emmer — 12:40 p.m.

By The New York Times

Emmer, 62, is the highest-ranking Republican in the race. Endorsed by McCarthy, Emmer is the No. 3 Republican in the House, whose job is to “whip,” or count votes, to pass the speaker’s agenda. A former college ice hockey player and coach, Emmer has allies among both the conservative and the establishment wings of the party. He served two terms as chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee.

House Majority Whip Tom Emmer last week. Jose Luis Magana/Associated Press

A look at the vote tally — 12:28 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Emmer received 117 votes from Republicans to become the nominee. Jordan, who failed to become speaker in three House votes before Republicans voted to drop him, received 124 when he was nominated.

Emmer’s total is slightly higher than Scalise, who received 113 to become the nominee but ended his bid before it went to a House vote.


Republicans nominate Tom Emmer as House speaker — 12:17 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Republicans on Tuesday nominated Emmer of Minnesota as House speaker, their third choice in a span of weeks after they ousted McCarthy.

The nominee will need to win a vote before the full House.


Speaker nomination is down to two candidates, Stefanik says — 11:55 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

The race for a speaker nominee is down to two candidates, Emmer and Johnson, Stefanik said.


What to know about the candidates still in the running — 11:53 a.m.

By The New York Times

Tom Emmer of Minnesota: Emmer, 62, is the highest-ranking Republican in the race. Endorsed by McCarthy, Emmer is the No. 3 Republican in the House, whose job is to “whip,” or count votes, to pass the speaker’s agenda. A former college ice hockey player and coach, Emmer has allies among both the conservative and the establishment wings of the party. He served two terms as chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee.

Byron Donalds of Florida: Donalds, 44, a member of the ultraconservative House Freedom Caucus, is a favorite of the party’s right wing. This is only his second term in Congress; he won his Naples-based district in 2020. A native New Yorker, he received as many as 20 votes for speaker on the House floor in January during the prolonged fight that resulted in McCarthy emerging as speaker.

Kevin Hern of Oklahoma: Hern, 61, is chair of the Republican Study Committee, a group committed to advancing conservative ideology that a majority of the Republican conference belongs to. The post often serves as a springboard to leadership positions. Nicknamed the “McCongressman” for his previous ownerships of 18 McDonald’s franchises, Hern, a former aerospace engineer, was elected to the House in 2018.

Mike Johnson of Louisiana: Johnson, 51, is a lawyer who is a former chair of the conservative Republican Study Committee. An evangelical Christian who is a member of the Judiciary Committee, Johnson was a key architect of Republicans’ objections to certifying the victory of Biden on Jan. 6, 2021. Many Republicans in Congress relied on his arguments.

Representative Mike Johnson spoke to reporters before a House Republican candidates forum on Tuesday. Justin Sullivan/Getty

Emmer emerges as top vote getter in first ballots — 11:46 a.m.

By the Associated Press

The senior-most lawmaker, Rep. Tom Emmer, the GOP whip, jumped out front as the top vote-getter in the first ballots, but it’s no sure path to the gavel. Others have started dropping out.

“We’re going to have to figure out how to get our act together — I mean, big boys and big girls have got to quit making excuses and we just got to get it done,” said Representative Dusty Johnson, of South Dakota, a conservative caucus leader.


4 candidates are in the running, Stefanik says — 11:23 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Donalds, Emmer, Hern, and Johnson are left as Republicans enter voting on the fourth ballot.


5 candidates are in the running, Stefanik says — 10:59 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Republicans were voting behind closed doors on five potential House speaker nominees, as the field continues to shrink.

For the third ballot, five candidates were still in the running. They are Donalds, Emmer, Hern, Johnson, and Scott, according to Stefanik.


Now 7 candidates are in the running — 10:30 a.m.

By the Associated Press

Early Tuesday morning, Representative Gary Palmer of Alabama announced he would withdraw, leaving seven contenders.


Speaker candidates are mostly conservatives and election deniers — 9:40 a.m.

By the Associated Press

Those running for speaker are mostly conservatives and election deniers, who either voted against certifying the 2020 presidential election results, when Biden defeated Trump, in the run up to the Jan. 6, 2021 attack on the Capitol, or joined a subsequent lawsuit challenging the results.


House Republicans meet privately to try to nominate speaker — 8:45 a.m.

By the Associated Press

House Republicans will meet privately to try nominating a new House speaker to accomplish the seemingly impossible job of uniting a broken, bitter GOP majority and returning to the work of governing in Congress.

Having dispatched their speaker then rejected two popular GOP figures as replacements, the House Republicans on Tuesday will be voting instead on a hodge-podge of lesser-known congressmen for speaker, a powerful position second in line to the presidency. The private session could take all day before a nominee emerges.


 

October 23, 2023

 

One Republican drops out of House speaker race — 8:40 p.m.

By the Associated Press

As Republicans gathered late in the evening to hear quick speeches from the congressmen seeking the gavel, the nine candidates suddenly dropped to eight, as Representative Dan Meuser of Pennsylvania dropped out. The others were making their elevator pitches to become House speaker ahead of internal party voting.

Representative Dan Meuser spoke to the media after ending his bid for speaker of the House outside of a House Republican candidates forum on Monday. Win McNamee/Getty

What comes next? — 12:30 p.m.

By The New York Times

House Republicans are expected to meet Monday evening to hold a candidate forum for aspiring speaker nominees to present their visions for the conference.

They plan to hold an internal election for a new nominee Tuesday — and if they elect one, Republicans could go to the House floor for a vote that same day.

But because nine Republicans are running for the job, that internal election may take longer than usual. Conference rules mandate that the party nominee must capture a simple majority of votes. If no one captures a majority on the first ballot, the candidate who received the fewest votes will be kicked off the second ballot and lawmakers will vote again. That process will continue until there is a nominee.


All candidates but 2 objected to certifying Biden’s 2020 victory in at least one state — 10:00 a.m.

By The New York Times

All candidates except for two — Representatives Tom Emmer of Minnesota and Austin Scott of Georgia — voted to object to certifying President Biden’s 2020 victory in least one state.


These nine Republicans have entered the speaker’s race — 8:00 a.m.

By The New York Times

Nine Republicans have announced that they will run for speaker, after the party cast aside Jordan as its latest nominee for the leadership post.

A flood of lawmakers began campaigning just hours after Republicans voted in a closed-door meeting to restart the nomination process after Jordan, his support ebbing, failed on a third-floor vote to win the speakership. The vote essentially ensured that the office of the speaker would remain empty for a third week.

The lawmakers vying for the job include veterans of the House, committee chairs, a top member of Republican leadership, and a sophomore. Virtually none have the kind of commanding national profile normally required of the speaker, who is not only second in line to the presidency but a key fund-raiser for their party’s efforts to protect and expand its majority.

Here’s what to know about them.


 

October 20, 2023

 

Bergman enters speaker race — 3:40 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Michigan Representative Jack Bergman announced he’s running for speaker.


Will House Republicans come together? — 3:27 p.m.

By Tal Kopan, Globe Staff

As they left their afternoon meeting once again without a speaker designee, Republicans said they needed to come together.

But as they walked away, some carrying leftover boxes of pizza, it didn’t sound like the hard feelings had subsided.

”There’s obviously a problem from my perspective that a significant portion of our conference doesn’t want to do the things that they tell the voters they want to do,” said Virginia Republican Bob Good, who backed Jordan and voted for the motion that ousted McCarthy, when asked if the conference could come together. “There’s a significant portion of our conference that is fine with the establishment swamp running the place.”

Asked the same question, California Republican Mike Garcia, who represents a swing district, said there was no alternative.”I think it’s possible,” Garcia said. “Otherwise we’re screwed. If we can’t do it, then we’re genuinely screwed as a country.”


‘We’re in a very bad position as a party,’ McCarthy says — 3:15 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

“We’ll have to go back to the drawing board,” McCarthy said, as Republicans work to start over on nominating a speaker.

McCarthy placed blame on Matt Gaetz and the seven other Republicans who voted to oust him as speaker earlier this month, saying “the amount of damage they’ve done to this party and to this country is insurmountable.”

“I’ve never seen this amount of damage done to just a few people for their own personalities, for their own fear of what’s going through,” he said.

“It’s astonishing to me, and we’re in a very bad position as a party, one that has won the majority, one that America has entrusted us with, that a simple 8 people have put us in this place.”


Here’s what’s next — 3:06 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Republicans will return Monday at 6:30 p.m. for a candidate forum before they come in on Tuesday at 9 a.m. for an election process, McHenry said.

“The reason why I made that decision is we need space and time for candidates to talk to other members,” he said.


These lawmakers have announced their speaker candidacies — 2:53 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Representatives Kevin Hern of Oklahoma and Austin Scott of Georgia have announced they’re running for House speaker.


Watch: Jordan speaks after Republicans drop him as nominee — 2:39 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Jordan said House Republicans “made a different decision” when they were asked if they wanted him to continue as their speaker nominee.

“We need to come together and figure out who our speaker is going to be,” he said. “I’m going to work as hard as I can to help that individual so that we can go help the American people.”

“It’s important we do unite, let’s figure out who that individual is, get behind them, and get to work for the American people,” he said.


Jordan withdraws from speaker race after secret ballot — 2:14 p.m.

By Tal Kopan, Globe Staff

Jordan withdrew his nomination after Republicans voted in a secret ballot that he should not continue to be their nominee, according to Republicans leaving the GOP meeting.


Jordan loses secret ballot on staying in speaker race — 2:07 p.m.

By Tal Kopan, Globe Staff

Following Jordan’s third loss, House Republicans gathered behind closed doors to vote on whether he should continue to be their nominee by secret ballot. They ultimately decided against it, voting 86 to 112 against Jordan continuing his candidacy, according to Representative Kat Cammack.


How lawmakers are reacting after the third vote — 1:36 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff


House Republicans are about to meet — 12:56 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

House Republican lawmakers are meeting privately at 1 p.m. after failing to elect a speaker for the third time.

On his way to the meeting, Jordan told a CNN reporter that he plans to try to make up the lack of support during the meeting.


These 25 Republicans didn’t vote for Jordan — 12:48 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Here are the 25 Republicans who didn’t back Jordan in the third round, and who they voted for instead.

  • Bacon voted for McHenry
  • Buchanan voted for Donalds
  • Buck voted for Emmer
  • Chavez-DeRamer voted for McHenry
  • D’Esposito voted for Zeldin
  • Díaz-Balart voted for Scalise
  • Ellzey voted for Garcia
  • Ferguson voted for Scalise
  • Fitzpatrick voted for McHenry
  • Garbarino voted for Zeldin
  • Giménez voted for McCarthy
  • Tony Gonzalez voted for Scalise
  • Granger voted for Scalise
  • James voted for Donalds
  • Kean voted for McCarthy
  • Kelly voted for Scalise
  • Kiggans voted for McHenry
  • LaLota voted for Zeldin
  • Lawler voted for McHenry
  • Miller-Meeks voted for McHenry
  • Molinaro voted for Zeldin
  • Rutherford voted for Scalise
  • Simpson voted for Scalise
  • Stauber voted for Westerman
  • Womack voted for Scalise

Three lawmakers flipped their votes in the third round — 12:31 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

In the latest round, Representatives Marc Molinaro of New York, Tom Kean of New Jersey, and Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania flipped their votes from Jordan to others.

Molinaro voted for Zeldin, Kean voted for McCarthy, and Fitzpatrick voted for McHenry.


The House is in recess — 12:20 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

After failing to elect a speaker on the third try, McHenry gaveled the House into recess.

“A speaker has not been elected,” he said.


See the results from the third vote — 12:13 p.m.

By Adri Pray and Christina Prignano, Globe Correspondent and Globe Staff

Here’s a look at how the three votes unfolded:


Jordan fails in third vote to win speakership — 12:07 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Jordan failed in the third vote to win the speakership on Friday. In the official tally, he received 194 votes, Jeffries received 210, and others received 25.


The unofficial third vote tally — 11:52 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

In the unofficial tally of the third vote, 210 lawmakers voted for Jeffries, 194 voted for Jordan, and 25 lawmakers voted for others. According to unofficial results, Jordan appeared to fall short of the speakership for the third time.


25 Republicans decline to back Jordan — 11:48 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Twenty-five Republicans have declined to back Jordan. No House Republicans have switched their vote to support him in the third round.


Molinaro flips against Jordan — 11:36 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

New York Representative Marc Molinaro flipped his vote from Jordan to vote for Zeldin in the third round. There are now 21 votes against Jordan.


Votes against Jordan are up to 19 — 11:32 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Nineteen Republicans are declining to back Jordan so far.

Watch live as the vote continues.


Another new no vote for Jordan — 11:29 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Tom Kean of New Jersey flipped his vote from Jordan to McCarthy.


Now 13 votes against Jordan — 11:25 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Garbarino, Giménez, Tony Gonzalez, and Granger all declined to back Jordan in the third vote, bringing the number of Republican votes against him to 13.


A Jordan vote flips for McHenry — 11:20 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania, who had previously voted for Jordan, voted for McHenry in the third round, marking a new no vote for Jordan.

Representative Brian Fitzpatrick during a third round of voting for House speaker on Friday. HAIYUN JIANG/NYT

Seven votes against Jordan — 11:16 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Anthony D’Esposito of New York again for former Representative Lee Zeldin, and Mario Díaz-Balart of Florida voted for Scalise.

Jake Ellzey of Texas voted for Mike Garcia of California.


Chavez-DeRemer votes for McHenry — 11:14 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Lori Chavez-DeRemer voted for McHenry, marking four Republican votes against Jordan.


Three Republicans don’t vote for Jordan — 11:11 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

There are now three Republicans who declined to back Jordan, after Buchanan voted for Byron Donalds and Buck voted for Tom Emmer.


Bacon votes for McHenry — 11:09 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Don Bacon of Nebraska, who has declined to back Jordan, voted for Patrick McHenry. In the last two rounds of voting, he had voted for McCarthy.


Voting is underway. Track the votes live. — 11:06 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Voting is underway for a third time to elect a House speaker.

Use our tracker to follow along with the vote tally.


‘The majority’s nominee is disconnected,’ Clark says of Jordan — 11:04 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Clark began her nominating speech by emphasizing the 212 votes Jeffries has received in the last two rounds of voting.

”Leader Jeffries has answered our call,” Clark said. “But the majority’s nominee is disconnected. Disconnected from the American people and their values. MAGA extremism is designed to divide, and it has broken the Republican Party.”

”It is not too late for the majority to choose a bipartisan path forward to reopen the House,” Clark said.

”Every day the majority chooses to engage in a Republican civil war that is threatening their own members instead of engaging with us in the work of the American people is a day that weakens this institution and the standing of our country,” she said.

Representative Katherine Clark nominated Representative Hakeem Jeffries, right, for House speaker on Friday. HAIYUN JIANG/NYT

Clark nominates Jeffries — 11:00 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Clark is nominating Hakeem Jeffries now. Watch it live.


McCarthy nominates Jordan — 10:54 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

McCarthy, who was ousted from the speakership 17 days ago, is nominating Jordan.

He described Jordan as an “effective legislator” who can reach compromises, prompting laughs from Democrats.

Those with their names on legislation can be “selfish,” McCarthy said, but Jordan “is one of the most selfless members I know.”

In Jordan’s 16 years in Washington, not a single bill bearing his name has been signed into law.


427 members are present for the vote — 10:50 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Four hundred twenty-seven members are present for the third vote. That means Jordan will need 214 votes to become speaker.


A Jordan voter will be absent from the third round — 10:40 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Wisconsin Representative Derrick Van Orden, who has voted for Jordan in the last two rounds, will be absent from the next round of votes because he is heading to Israel amid the Israel-Hamas war, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.


Katherine Clark will nominate Jeffries this time — 10:24 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman and Tal Kopan, Globe Staff

Massachusetts Representative Katherine Clark, a Revere Democrat and House minority whip, will nominate Jeffries for speaker, according to her office.

In the previous two round of voting, California Representative Pete Aguilar has delivered Jeffries’s nominating speech.

House Minority Leader Hakeem Jeffries, accompanied by Democratic Whip Representative Katherine Clark and Democratic Caucus Chair Representative Pete Aguilar, talked to reporters before walking to the House chamber at the Capitol in Washington on Friday. Jose Luis Magana/Associated Press

House gavels in — 10:05 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Patrick McHenry gaveled in the House on Friday morning.

Then, there will be a prayer, a quorum call, nominating speeches, and then the vote.


Jeffries says Democrats will ‘be here as long as it takes to end this nightmare’ — 10:01 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

House Democratic Leader Hakeem Jeffries, when asked about the prospect of standing by for more speaker votes this weekend, told reporters that Democrats will “be here as long as it takes to end this nightmare.”


The House is set to convene soon. Watch it live. — 9:55 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

House lawmakers are convening in a few minutes to try to elect a speaker.

Watch the vote live.


A look at the tally from the second vote — 9:33 a.m.

By Christina Prignano and Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

In the second round of voting for a speaker on Wednesday, Jeffries received 212 votes, Jordan got 199, and others got 22.


Some names to watch in the third speaker vote — 9:12 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

These are the 22 lawmakers who didn’t back Jordan in the second round, and who they voted for instead:

  • Bacon for McCarthy
  • Buchanan for Donalds (flip vote)
  • Buck for Emmer
  • Chavez-DeRemer for McCarthy
  • D’Esposito for Zeldin
  • Díaz-Balart for Scalise
  • Ellzey for Garcia
  • Ferguson for Scalise (flip vote)
  • Garbarino foro Zeldin
  • Giménez for McCarthy
  • Gonzalez for Scalise
  • Granger for Scalise
  • James for Miller
  • Kelly for Boehner
  • Kiggans for McCarthy
  • LaLota for Zeldin
  • Lawler for McCarthy
  • Miller-Meeks for Granger (flip vote)
  • Rutherford for Scalise
  • Simpson for Scalise
  • Stauber for Westerman (flip vote)
  • Womack for Scalise

Watch Jordan’s Friday morning press conference — 8:53 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff


Friday could produce an even worse tally for Jordan — 8:37 a.m.

By the Associated Press

Drawing on his Ohio roots, the far-right Jordan, who is popular with the GOP’s activist base of voters, positioned his long-shot campaign alongside the history of American innovators including the Wright brothers, urging his colleagues to elect him to the speakership.

“We need to get to work for the American people,” he said.

But after two failed votes, Jordan’s third attempt at the gavel is not expected to end any better. In fact, Friday is likely to produce an even worse tally for the fiery Judiciary Committee chairman — in large part because more centrist rank-and-file Republicans are revolting over the hardball tactics being used to win their votes. They have been bombarded with harassing phone calls and even reported death threats.


Jordan vows to ‘fight the good fight’ ahead of third vote — 8:18 a.m.

By Shannon Larson, Globe Staff

At a morning press conference, Jordan vowed to “fight the good fight” and indicated that he would forge ahead with a third speaker vote Friday, and go into the weekend if necessary.

“The quickest way to get all this work in is to get a speaker elected,” Jordan said. “That’s what I hope we can do today.”

The Ohio Republican said he thinks the votes he “lost can come back,” adding that “there have been multiple rounds of votes for speaker before.”

“The plan this weekend is to get a speaker elected to the House of Representatives as soon as possible,” Jordan said.


 

October 19, 2023

 

House to convene Friday morning for speaker vote, Jordan spokesperson says — 7:19 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

The House will meet Friday morning at 10 a.m. for another vote to elect a House speaker, Jordan’s spokesperson said.


‘I plan to go to the floor and get the votes,’ Jordan says — 3:17 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Jordan told reporters on Thursday afternoon that he’s still running for speaker and plans “to go to the floor and get the votes and win this race.”

The resolution to empower McHenry was pitched to House Republicans “as a way to lower the temperature and get back to work,” Jordan said. “We decided that wasn’t where we’re going to go.”

Jordan said he planned to talk with the 20 people who voted against him “so that we can move forward and begin to work for the American people.” Twenty Republicans voted for other candidates on Tuesday while 22 Republicans declined to back him in Wednesday’s vote. It was unclear when a third round of voting would take place.


Jordan’s speaker run resurfaces allegations he ignored abuse — 2:14 p.m.

By Jeremy C. Fox, Globe Staff

Jordan, an Ohio Republican, is known on the national stage for his hard-right stances on immigration and tax policy and a deep loyalty to former president Donald Trump, who has endorsed him for speaker. Jordan’s attempt to become House speaker has also resurfaced allegations that he ignored the sexual abuse of student athletes at Ohio State University when he worked there 30 years ago.

Jordan, who worked as an assistant wrestling coach at Ohio State in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s, has long denied any knowledge of alleged abuse at the university. A spokesperson for Jordan said in 2018 that the congressman was unaware of any allegations while he was a coach there and had not been contacted by investigators at that time.

Read the full story.


Temporary plan: Dead or alive? — 2:14 p.m.

By Tal Kopan, Globe Staff

Several Republicans emerged from their closed-door meeting declaring “dead” the idea to temporarily empower McHenry with speakership powers, including Vern Buchanan and Byron Donalds. Buchanan said “reading the room,” it was clear the idea didn’t have support.

But some are not giving up.

Don Bacon, one of the leading anti-Jordan advocates, said he wouldn’t go that far yet. Kat Cammack said the past three hours had been an intense discussion about what even is constitutionally permissible, leaving many to conclude the McHenry plan was not viable.

Bacon predicted nothing would come to the floor today, at this point.


State of play in the House: Chaos — 1:52 p.m.

By Tal Kopan, Globe Staff

This morning, Republican speaker candidate Jordan announced to his GOP colleagues that he wants to see McHenry granted temporary full powers to oversee the House, giving himself more time to try to cobble together the needed votes for his speakership.

But we remain in a state of limbo, and here’s why:

In the meeting, Republicans were not in agreement on the plan. Some thought Jordan was self-servingly try to delay the inevitable, others thought it would give power to Democrats.

But even beyond the disagreement — it’s not even clear what the resolution would look like, how long it would run for, and what would work under the law and the Constitution. All of the above remains in flux.

Further, with it likely that Democratic votes would be needed to pass such a resolution, Democrats are not tipping their hand, saying they want some assurances that voting for such a deal would guarantee votes on government funding, monetary support for Israel and Ukraine, and generally a sense that someone will be holding up Republicans’ end of the bargain. At the moment, though, it’s not even clear who Democrats would be negotiating with, as McHenry says he is just going along with the conference and Jordan wouldn’t have the power to cut any deals in this scenario.

TLDR: The House remains in an incredibly fluid situation and no one is quite sure what is going to happen next.


It reportedly got heated in the Republicans’ meeting — 1:25 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

According to Capitol Hill reporters, tensions were rising as House Republican lawmakers met to consider how to move forward.

McCarthy screamed at Matt Gaetz to sit down, according to Juliegrace Brufke, a congressional reporter for Axios. McCarthy is backing the effort to empower McHenry, while Gaetz, who led the effort to oust McCarthy as speaker more than two weeks ago, said today he would try to stop it.


McCarthy ally says it’s unclear if support is there for a temporary speaker — 12:34 p.m.

By the Associated Press

A McCarthy ally Rep. David Valadao, R-Calif., said there was a show of hands at the private meeting asking members whether they would support the pro-tempore effort but it was just “a small number that raised their hands.”

“I just don’t know if the numbers are there,” he said.

Still, installing a temporary speaker for the next few months is backed by many of Jordan’s opponents and would give him an offramp so he would not have to declare defeat.


House convenes, then goes into recess — 12:07 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

The House on Thursday afternoon, then McHenry gaveled lawmakers into recess.


How lawmakers are reacting to plan to empower McHenry — 11:53 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff


Lawmaker who flipped vote against Jordan in the second round says he’s getting death threats — 11:44 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Georgia Representative Drew Ferguson, who voted for Jordan in the first ballot on Tuesday and then voted for Scalise in the second on Wednesday, said he and his family started receiving death threats after he changed his vote.

“That is simply unacceptable, unforgivable, and will never be tolerated,” Ferguson said.


Jordan reportedly won’t seek a third speaker vote — 11:27 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Multiple outlets are reporting Jordan won’t seek a third speaker vote on Thursday and will instead back an effort to give the interim speaker pro tempore, Patrick McHenry, more power to reopen the immobilized House and temporarily conduct routine business.

CNN, The Washington Post, and Punchbowl News reported on the plan on Thursday morning.


We don’t know what’s going to happen with the speaker race — 11:03 a.m.

By Tal Kopan, Globe Staff

Bottom line up front: We don’t know what’s going to happen with the House speaker’s race, or when.

This is an unprecedented moment of incredible uncertainty in the House, as the chamber is in its third week without a speaker and Congress remains effectively paralyzed by the Republican in-fighting.

Several paths forward are viable, some others are less likely, but Washington is essentially at the mercy of the choices of Ohio Republican Jim Jordan, who Republicans nominated to be speaker last week, and Speaker Pro Tempore Patrick McHenry of North Carolina right now, and they are figuring out what they want to do next.

Here is the basic state of play.


Three N.Y. Republicans say they still won’t back Jordan — 10:50 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Three New York Republicans who voted against Jordan in the first round of speaker votes on Tuesday and Wednesday released a joint statement on Thursday saying they still won’t vote for him.

Representatives Anthony D’Esposito, Andrew Garbarino, and Nick LaLota, said in a statement posted to X that they “remain steadfast that the next Speaker of the House prioritize our neighbors’ concerns.”

“While Chairman Jordan has not yet made an offer addressing our priorities, we remain in communication with the Chairman in hopes of finding common ground,” the statement said.


The House will convene at noon, but it’s unclear if a speaker vote will happen — 10:35 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

The House is expected to reconvene at noon on Thursday, but it’s unclear if a third round of voting to elect a speaker will take place.


 

October 18, 2023

 


The next speaker vote will reportedly be Thursday — 4:37 p.m.

By the Associated Press

There will be no further votes for House speaker on Wednesday after Republicans reached an impasse on how to move forward with picking a leader, according to the Associated Press, which cited a person familiar with the matter.

The next speaker vote will take place on Thursday, according to the person, who spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity to discuss private negotiations.

Jordan, who was nominated by the Republican conference last week, has faced back-to-back defeats as a number of moderate GOP lawmakers have refused to throw their support behind him.

Republicans’ next move is unclear. A bipartisan group of lawmakers have floated an extraordinary plan — to give the interim speaker pro tempore, Patrick McHenry, more power to reopen the immobilized House and temporarily conduct routine business. But it’s unclear if majority Republicans will pursue that.


Arrests made at demonstration over Israel-Hamas war — 3:56 p.m.

By the Associated Press

As the House recessed after another failed speaker vote, a large group of demonstrators from Jewish advocacy groups gathered at one of the Capitol office buildings to call for a ceasefire in the ongoing war between Israel and Hamas.

The dozens of demonstrators chanted, “Not in our name!” in reference to Israel’s bombardment of Gaza in response to a recent attack by Hamas. Some were arrested for illegally demonstrating in a Capitol office building.

Without a speaker, many members of the House have been frustrated by the chamber’s inability to pass legislation, particularly in response to the war.

Police lined up detained protesters outside the Cannon Office Building, where they were being shuttled to a temporary holding area in the Capitol complex. None of the protesters was in the Capitol building itself.


‘The ball’s in their court,’ Katherine Clark says — 3:30 p.m.

By the Associated Press

Democrats say they are waiting for Republicans to reach out for their support to elect a House speaker after two weeks without one.

Rep. Katherine Clark of Massachusetts, the No. 2 House Democrat, says, “The ball’s in their court. This is their civil war.”

Democrats met briefly Wednesday for a closed-door strategy session after Ohio Republican Rep. Jim Jordan lost the speaker’s vote for a second day in a row.

Clark says she hopes Republicans will come to Democrats to talk about alternatives to move forward.

Bipartisan groups of lawmakers have been floating ways to operate the House by giving greater power to the interim speaker, Republican Rep. Patrick McHenry of North Carolina, or another temporary speaker.


‘All options are on the table,’ Jeffries says — 2:52 p.m.

By the Associated Press

Jeffries says “all options are on the table to end the Republican civil war.”

Jeffries made the comment Wednesday after majority Republicans failed for a second day to elect Jordan as speaker. The final vote total was 199 for Jordan and 212 for Jeffries, with both short of the 217 votes needed to win the gavel.

On Wednesday, Jeffries reiterated his earlier call to reopen the House in a “bipartisan way.”

He has shown willingness to support a Republican speaker but also wants Republicans to negotiate with Democrats for their support.

Bipartisan groups of lawmakers have been floating ways to operate the House by giving greater power to Rep. Patrick McHenry, the speaker pro tem, or another temporary speaker. The House had never ousted its speaker before Kevin McCarthy two weeks ago, and the lawmakers are in rarely tested terrain.


McCarthy says Jordan shouldn’t give up now — 2:30 p.m.

By the Associated Press

McCarthy says Jordan should have the opportunity to earn the nomination for the speaker’s gavel.

After Jordan failed on a second ballot Wednesday, McCarthy noted that it took 15 rounds of balloting before he himself was successful in January. He was ousted from the job two weeks ago.

He also said he had two months to wrangle the necessary votes. Jordan, he said, has only had days.

When asked what advice he would give to Jordan, McCarthy said he would encourage him to talk to members and listen. He said he “definitely” wouldn’t tell Jordan to give up after only two or three rounds of votes.


The GOP lawmakers who didn’t back Jordan — 2:03 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

These are the 22 lawmakers who didn’t back Jordan in the second round, and who they voted for instead:

  • Bacon for McCarthy
  • Buchanan for Donalds (flip vote)
  • Buck for Emmer
  • Chavez-DeRemer for McCarthy
  • D’Esposito for Zeldin
  • Díaz-Balart for Scalise
  • Ellzey for Garcia
  • Ferguson for Scalise (flip vote)
  • Garbarino foro Zeldin
  • Giménez for McCarthy
  • Gonzalez for Scalise
  • Granger for Scalise
  • James for Miller
  • Kelly for Boehner
  • Kiggans for McCarthy
  • LaLota for Zeldin
  • Lawler for McCarthy
  • Miller-Meeks for Granger (flip vote)
  • Rutherford for Scalise
  • Simpson for Scalise
  • Stauber for Westerman (flip vote)
  • Womack for Scalise

Jordan vows to stay in race despite losing support in second round — 1:40 p.m.

By the Associated Press

Jordan is vowing to stay in the race for House speaker despite shedding support in the second round of voting.

The Ohio congressman said he would meet with lawmakers individually, but did not know when he would seek a third round of voting. He came up 18 votes short of winning the gavel Wednesday.

“We picked up some today, a couple dropped off, but they voted for me before and I think they can come back again, so we’ll keep talking to members, keep working on it,” Jordan told reporters.

He said he felt he could bring the conference together.

“We’ve got a complete cross-section of the conference. There’s, you know, 20 individuals we need to talk to. We continue to do that.”


‘We’re going to keep going,’ Jordan spokesperson says — 1:27 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

A spokesperson for Jim Jordan said that “we’re going to keep going.”


Where those 22 Republican votes went — 1:20 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Twenty-two Republicans didn’t vote for Jordan in the second round. Here’s who got their votes:

  • Scalise: 7
  • McCarthy: 5
  • Zeldin: 3
  • Donalds: 1
  • Emmer: 1
  • Mike Garcia: 1
  • Miller: 1
  • Boehner: 1
  • Granger: 1
  • Westerman: 1

The House recesses — 1:19 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

The House is in recess after it failed to elect a speaker in the second round of voting.


The official tally — 1:17 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Out of 433 votes cast, Jordan got 199, Jeffries got 212, and others received 22 votes.


How key GOP votes changed from first to second rounds — 1:12 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Four Republicans — Buchanan, Ferguson, Miller-Meeks, and Stauber, changed their votes from backing Jordan to backing others in the second round, and two GOP lawmakers — LaMalfa and Spartz — who voted for others in the first round decided to back Jordan in the second. One lawmaker, Bilirakis, who was absent in Tuesday’s vote for personal reasons was present during Wednesday’s vote and backed Jordan.


House GOP will meet after second vote, lawmakers says — 1:06 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

With Jordan appearing to have lost on the second ballot, Representative Kevin Hern of Oklahoma said Republican lawmakers plan to head to a conference meeting at 1:30 p.m.


Jordan appears to fall short of votes to become speaker — 12:56 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

With 22 Republican votes against him in an unofficial tally, Jordan doesn’t appear to have the votes to become speaker in the second round of voting.


Jordan loses another vote, now has 21 Republicans who don’t support him — 12:50 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Pete Stauber of Minnesota, who voted for Jordan yesterday, voted for Representative Bruce Westerman of Arkansas, marking the 21st vote against Jordan, one more than the number who voted against him Tuesday. So far, he has lost 4 votes from the first to second round of balloting.


A look at the scene on the House floor — 12:47 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Representative Jim Jordan, second row second from left, listened as the House convened for a second day of balloting to elect a speaker. J. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press
From left to right, Representatives Carlos Giménez (R-FL), Mike Lawler (R-NY), Anthony D'Esposito (R-NY) and Nicholas LaLota (R-NY) talked as the House of Representatives holds its second round of voting for a new speaker. Chip Somodevilla/Getty
A member of Congress kept track of voting in the second round as Republicans try to elect Representative Jim Jordan as speaker. Alex Brandon/Associated Press
Representative Hakeem Jeffries stood for applause as he is nominated for House speaker.AL DRAGO/NYT

So far, 18 Republicans aren’t backing Jordan — 12:40 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

The number of Republicans who are declining to support Jordan is up to 18. Watch live as voting continues.


Jordan picks up a vote — 12:36 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Doug LaMalfa of California, who voted for McCarthy yesterday, voted for Jordan on Wednesday.


A vote for Boehner — 12:31 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Mike Kelly of Pennsylvania, who voted for Scalise yesterday, votes for former speaker John Boehner. Jennifer Kiggans of Virginia again votes for McCarthy.


13 GOP votes against Jordan — 12:29 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Thirteen Republican lawmakers have now voted against Jordan for speaker.


Another Jordan vote flips — 12:24 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Drew Ferguson of Georgia, who voted for Jordan on Tuesday, voted for Scalise.


Now it’s six not voting for Jordan — 12:22 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Anthony D’Esposito of New York again voted for Zeldin, and Mario Díaz-Balart of Florida again voted for Scalise.


Four Republicans don’t back Jordan — 12:21 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Lori Chavez-DeRemer of Oregon, who voted for McCarthy on Tuesday, again voted for him, and Ken Buck of Colorado again voted for Majority Whip Tom Emmer of Minnesota.


Vern Buchanan’s Jordan vote flips — 12:18 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Vern Buchanan, a Florida lawmaker, who voted for Jordan on Tuesday, voted for Representative Byron Donalds.


Bacon votes for McCarthy — 12:14 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Don Bacon of Nebraska, who voted for McCarthy in Tuesday’s vote, again voted for the former House speaker, marking the first GOP lawmaker not to back Jordan.


Voting is starting now — 12:11 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Watch live as lawmakers are voting now to elect a speaker.


Aguilar again nominates Jeffries — 12:07 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Democratic Representative Pete Aguilar again nominated House Minority Leader Hakeem Jeffries of New York for speaker.

Aguilar highlighted that Jeffries got more votes than Jordan in Tuesday’s vote, with Jeffries receiving 212 and Jordan receiving 200, saying Jeffries “has the support to be [the] speaker that this country needs.”

“No amount of election denying is going to take away from those vote totals,” Aguilar said, taking a shot at Jordan’s refusal to accept the results of the 2020 election.

Representative Pete Aguilar nominated Hakeem Jeffries, right, for House speaker on Wednesday. AL DRAGO/NYT

Jordan can only lose 4 votes to become speaker — 12:05 p.m.

By the Associated Press

Jordan can lose up to four Republican votes on Wednesday’s vote and still become speaker.

But it will be a slog to get there. He lost 20 GOP votes in the first round of voting Tuesday.

To be elected speaker, a member must win more than half the votes in the chamber. The typically 435-member House currently has two vacancies, and one Democrat wasn’t present for Wednesday’s vote, so Jordan would need 217 to win.

On Tuesday’s first ballot, Jordan only managed to win 200 votes. Democratic leader Hakeem Jeffries won 212, still short of the number needed.


Cole nominates Jordan for speaker — 11:57 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Representative Tom Cole of Oklahoma is nominating Jordan for speaker, saying lawmakers have a chance today to end the “chaos” and “uncertainty” in the chamber that has gone 15 days without a speaker.

“It takes a spine of steel to do this job,” Cole said. “My friend has that kind of determination, has that kind of character, has that kind of spine, and I think the next speaker is going to need that quality and I know my friend has it in great abundance.”

If you’re a Republican, it “ought to be a pretty easy decision,” Cole added.

Representative Jim Jordan, center left, thanked Representative Tom Cole for his endorsement.J. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press

A look at some of the conversations on the House floor — 11:42 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

As the House holds a quorum call, Capitol Hill reporters covering the speaker vote say they are observing some interesting conversations taking place on the House floor. Here’s a sample:


Temporary speaker dismisses questions about resolution to give him more power — 11:36 a.m.

By the Associated Press

Patrick McHenry, the speaker pro tem, walked on to the House floor and dismissed questions about a resolution that would give him more powers as the conference struggles to elect a speaker.

“I’m going to the floor to support Jim Jordan,” the North Carolina Republican said ahead of Wednesday’s vote.

Bipartisan groups of lawmakers have been floating ways to operate the House by giving greater power to McHenry or another temporary speaker. The House had never ousted its speaker before Kevin McCarthy two weeks ago, and the lawmakers are in rarely tested terrain.

McHenry was named to the role of speaker pro tempore by McCarthy as part of a process established in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Never before used, the system was designed as a way to keep Congress functioning if leaders and lawmakers were killed or incapacitated. When he became speaker, McCarthy drafted a list of who should succeed him should something happen — and McHenry’s name was at the very top.


These 20 Republicans didn’t back Jordan on Tuesday — 11:25 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

These are the 20 Republicans who voted against Jordan in the first round of balloting on Tuesday, and where their votes went

  • Don Bacon of Nebraska voted for McCarthy
  • Lori Chavez-DeRemer of Oregon voted for McCarthy
  • Anthony D’Esposito of New York voted for Zeldin
  • Mario Díaz-Balart of Florida voted for Scalise
  • Jake Ellzey of Texas voted for Garcia
  • Andrew Garbarino of New York voted for Zeldin
  • Carlos Giménez of Florida voted for McCarthy
  • Tony Gonzales of Texas voted for Scalise
  • Kay Granger of Texas voted for Scalise
  • Mike Kelly of Pennsylvania voted for Scalise
  • Jennifer Kiggans of Virginia voted for McCarthy
  • Nick LaLota of New York voted for Zeldin
  • Mike Lawler of New York voted for McCarthy
  • John Rutherford of Florida voted for Scalise
  • Mike Simpson of Idaho voted for Scalise
  • Steve Womack of Arkansas voted for Scalise
  • Ken Buck of Colorado voted for Emmer
  • John James of Michigan voted for Cole
  • Doug LaMalfa of California voted for McCarthy
  • Victoria Spartz of Indiana voted for Massie

N.Y. representative who voted against Jordan Tuesday says he won’t back him today — 11:16 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

New York Representative Nick LaLota, who voted for former representative Lee Zeldin in Tuesday’s vote, wrote on the social media platform X that he would again vote against Jordan on Wednesday.

“For weeks, I’ve asked Speaker candidates to demonstrate how they’ll keep our government open and pay our troops while making progress on our budget and border,” LaLota wrote. “While I continue to meet with Mr. Jordan on this and issues important to my district, I cannot support any Speaker candidate without clarity on these important issues.”


House gavels into session — 11:04 a.m.

By the Associated Press

The House is gaveling into session ahead of a second vote to elect a speaker.

After a prayer and a quorum call, there will be nominating speeches, and then voting will begin.


Jordan supports vote for giving speaker pro temp more power — 10:55 a.m.

By the Associated Press

Jordan says the House should vote on a resolution that some centrist Republicans are pushing that would give the speaker pro tempore more power if they can’t agree on a permanent speaker.

“Let’s get an answer. We’ve been at this for two weeks,” Jordan told reporters just minutes before the House was gaveled into session for a second round of voting for speaker Wednesday. “The American people deserve to have their government functioning.”


House is meeting soon. Watch the proceedings live. — 10:40 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

The House is meeting Wednesday morning for a second round of voting. Watch it live.


Key holdout predicts more defections for Jordan — 10:25 a.m.

By the Associated Press

A key holdout to Jim Jordan’s bid for House speaker says he thinks Jordan will lose more votes on the second round of balloting.

Republican Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart of Florida said before Wednesday’s vote that he thinks the path will grow even more difficult for Jordan. The Florida congressman was among 20 Republicans who voted against Jordan in the first round.

Diaz-Balart also said that the strategy of trying to pressure Republicans into supporting Jordan is backfiring. He says honorable, dignified members of Congress oppose Jordan and threatening them will only make it worse.

When asked about whether he had personally received threats because of his opposition to Jordan, he declined to provide specifics, saying, “I keep my private stuff private.”

More generally, he said, “the nanosecond that anybody thinks they can intimidate me or threaten me is the day that I shut down.”


Gingrich and Boehner, former GOP speakers, float plan for interim deal — 10:00 a.m.

By the Associated Press

Bipartisan groups of lawmakers have been floating ways to operate the House by giving greater power to the interim speaker, Republican Rep. Patrick McHenry of North Carolina, or another temporary speaker. The House had never ousted its speaker before Kevin McCarthy, and the lawmakers are in rarely tested terrain.

Two former Republican House speakers, Newt Gingrich and John Boehner, have come out in support of the idea.

Gingrich said that while he likes Jordan, he has “no faith” the nominee can get much beyond the 200 votes he won in the first vote.

“We can’t sit around and suck our thumbs and hope the world will wait until the House Republicans get their act together,” Gingrich told Fox News’ Sean Hannity on his show.

Boehner reposted Gingrich’s views on social media, adding, “I agree.”

The two men have deep experience with the subject. Both were chased to early retirement by threats of ouster from right-flank insurgents like those who toppled McCarthy.


House to vote again this morning — 9:20 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

The House will try again on Wednesday to elect a House speaker, with plans to vote at 11 a.m. Jordan will have to pick up most of the 20 votes he lost on Tuesday afternoon to prevail.


Jordan says ‘we must stop attacking each other and come together’ — 9:00 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

After 20 of his Republican colleagues rejected him for speaker, Jordan took to the social media platform X to make a plea for party unity.

“We must stop attacking each other and come together,” he wrote. “There’s too much at stake. Let’s get back to working on the crisis at the southern border, inflation, and helping Israel.”


 

October 17, 2023

 

House adjourns, will reconvene Wednesday for speaker vote — 5:33 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

The House adjourned on Tuesday evening after Republicans failed to unite behind Jordan as speaker in the first round of voting. To win the position, he’ll need to gain the support of most of the 20 GOP lawmakers who declined to back him.

Jordan said lawmakers will return for a vote at 11 a.m. on Wednesday morning and will go “as many rounds as it takes” to elect a speaker.


Lawmakers call on McHenry to reconvene House for second vote — 4:39 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

With the House in recess after Jordan lost 20 Republican votes in the first round of voting, some GOP lawmakers are calling on House Speaker Pro Tempore Patrick McHenry to reconvene the House for a second round of voting.

In a letter to McHenry, Representative Mario Diaz-Balart, who voted for Scalise in the first round, wrote: “I respectfully request the House of Representatives return immediately and begin a second vote on electing a new Speaker.”

Other Republicans, including Representative Kay Granger, Don Bacon, Steve Womack, and Mariannette Miller-Meeks.

It’s not clear as of Tuesday evening when the House would reconvene, though Jordan’s spokesperson said in a statement to “expect another round of votes today.”


Nancy Pelosi says Republicans are ‘taking lessons in mathematics’ — 3:16 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

After Jordan lost 20 Republican votes in the first round of voting, California Representative Nancy Pelosi, the first woman to serve as speaker, said Republicans are “taking lessons in mathematics and learning how to count.”


Jordan might lose even more votes in the next rounds — 2:58 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Reporters on Capitol Hill say lawmakers are telling them Jordan could lose even more than 20 votes on the next ballots.


‘Expect another round of votes today,’ Jordan spokesperson says — 2:47 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

A spokesperson for Jordan said in a statement to “expect another round of votes today.”

“It’s time for Republicans to come together,” the spokesperson said.


No quick second round of voting, McCarthy says — 2:29 p.m.

By the Associated Press

McCarthy says he does not expected another vote on House speaker right away.

McCarthy said the Republican conference would regroup and talk to the members who have “differences of opinion” on who the next House speaker should be.

He noted that Jordan’s first round of balloting looked similar to his. McCarthy lost 19 votes back in January in his first election for speaker. Jordan lost 20.


House is in recess — 2:13 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Shortly after the final vote was tallied, the House moved to recess. There could be more votes today.


The final tally, plus where those 20 votes went — 2:06 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

The final tally of the first round of voting was Jordan with 200 votes, Jeffries with 212, and other current or former lawmakers receiving 20 votes. Here’s where those 20 votes went:

  • Scalise: 7
  • McCarthy: 6
  • Zeldin: 3
  • Mike Garcia of California: 1
  • Tom Emmer of Minnesota: 1
  • Tom Cole of Oklahoma: 1
  • Thomas Massie of Kentucky: 1

Jim Jordan fails to secure enough votes to become speaker — 1:55 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Jordan failed to secure enough votes to become House speaker in the first round of voting, having only received 200 votes. Jeffries received 212, while 20 votes went to others.


Jordan doesn’t appear to have the votes, as final number is tallied — 1:40 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Jordan appeared poised to lose the vote for House speaker in the first round, as the final vote count is tallied.


Number of lawmakers who didn’t vote for Jordan is up to 13 — 1:23 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Representatives Jen Kiggans of Florida voted for McCarthy, Mike Kelly for Scalise, and Nick LaLota of New York for Zeldin.


Lawmakers applaud as nominees vote for themselves — 1:19 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

As Jeffries and Jordan voted for themselves, members of their parties erupted in applause.


Now nine votes not supporting Jordan — 1:14 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

A total of nine GOP representatives failed to back Jordan for speaker.


Two more GOP lawmakers don’t support Jordan — 1:09 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Representatives Anthony D’Esposito of New York and Mario Díaz-Balart of Florida failed to back Jordan for speaker, instead voting for former New York representative Lee Zeldin and Steve Scalise, respectively.


Another GOP vote for McCarthy, not Jordan — 1:06 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Representative Lori Chavez-DeRemer, an Oregon Republican, also voted for McCarthy, making her the second Republican who declined to back Jordan.


Buck didn’t vote when his name was called — 1:04 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Representative Ken Buck of Colorado, a closely watched vote, didn’t vote when his name was called in the chamber.


Bacon votes for McCarthy — 1:01 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Representative Don Bacon of Nebraska was the first Republican to vote against Jordan, placing a vote for McCarthy instead.


Lawmakers are voting now — 12:59 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

House lawmakers are voting now to select a speaker.

Watch it live.


Jeffries and Jordan will be the only nominees — 12:56 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

No other lawmakers came forward to nominate another candidate for speaker, so Jeffries and Jordan will be the only nominees.


Aguilar nominates Jeffries — 12:48 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Democratic Representative Pete Aguilar of California nominated House Minority Leader Hakeem Jeffries of New York for House speaker.

Aguilar slammed Republicans for failing to elect a House speaker, saying the chamber was brought to a breaking point by “extremism and partisanship.”

Representative Pete Aguilar, Democrat of California, nominated Representative Hakeem Jeffries, Democrat of New York, for new Speaker of the House.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

“A vote today to make the architect of a nationwide abortion ban, a vocal election denier, and an insurrection insider to a speaker of this House would be a terrible message to the country and our allies,” Aguilar said, prompting Democrats to stand and applaud.


Stefanik nominates Jordan — 12:43 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Representative Elise Stefanik of New York is nominating Jordan for House speaker.

“Jim Jordan is a patriot,” Stefanik said in her nominating speech. “He is an America First warrior who wins the toughest of fights, going after corruption and delivering accountability at the highest levels of government on behalf of we the people.”

Representative Elise Stefanik, Republican of New York, was applauded as she spoke on the nomination of Representative Jim Jordan, of Ohio, as new Speaker of the House on Tuesday.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

432 members are present for voting — 12:42 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Four hundred thirty-two members of the House are present for today’s House speaker vote. That means Jordan needs 217 votes to become speaker, as long as no one votes that they are “present.”


What to know about Jim Jordan — 12:33 p.m.

By the Associated Press

Jordan’s journey to the cusp of House speakership would have once seemed far-fetched.

He was the founding member of the House Freedom Caucus, a group of conservative hardliners who pressured House Speaker John Boehner to step aside in 2015. Boehner famously called him a “legislative terrorist.”

Should Jordan succeed, it would help cement the far right’s takeover of the Republican Party and trigger fresh conflict with Democrats over the size and scope of government. Jordan questioned the results of the 2020 election and refused to say that President Biden won.

But a Jordan speakership would also come with baggage that could present a challenge to Republicans as they labor to hold their House majority in next year’s election, an effort that will likely hinge on drawing support from moderate voters in swing districts.


Some names to watch during today’s vote — 12:16 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

There are still a number of Republican holdouts heading into Tuesday’s vote. Some names to watch as voting begins include Don Bacon of Nebraska, Mario Diaz-Balart, Carlos Gimenez, Mike Kelly, Mike Lawler, and John Rutherford, according to NBC’s Scott Wong.


House gavels into session — 12:04 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

The House is gaveling into session ahead of a vote to elect Jim Jordan, though it’s unclear if he has enough support to prevail.

After a prayer and a quorum call, there will be nominating speeches for House speaker, and then the first round of voting will begin.


Voting is expected to start soon. Watch it live. — 11:56 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Republicans are expected to back Jim Jordan for speaker today, though a few holdouts remain. He can only afford to lose a few votes in the narrowly split House.

Watch the voting live.


Kevin McCarthy shares his prediction for the speaker vote — 11:45 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

McCarthy, who was ousted from the speakership two weeks ago and has been working to corral support among Republicans for Jordan, told Fox Tuesday morning that he predicts Jordan “will win this and even on the first round of votes.”

He went on to criticize Representative Matt Gaetz and the other Republicans who voted to remove him as speaker two weeks ago for creating “this chaos.”


A GOP holdout says Jordan’s refusal to admit Trump lost 2020 election is an issue — 11:41 a.m.

By the Associated Press

One holdout, Republican Rep. Ken Buck of Colorado, said Jordan’s role in the runup to the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol and his refusal to admit President Joe Biden won the 2020 election remained an issue.

“Jim, at some point, if he’s going to lead this conference during the presidential election cycle and particularly in a presidential election year ... is going to have to be strong and say Donald Trump didn’t win the election and we need to move forward,” Buck said.

Jordan has been a top Trump ally, particularly during the Jan. 6 Capitol attack by the former president’s backers who were trying to overturn the 2020 election he lost to Biden. Days later, Trump awarded Jordan a Medal of Freedom.


Jordan says he feels ‘confident’ about the vote — 11:30 a.m.

By the Associated Press

Jordan says he’s been picking up support every day and feels good ahead of the vote for House speaker.

“I feel confident,” he said Tuesday while trailed by a scrum of reporters in the Capitol.

When asked if he thought it would take many rounds for him to become speaker, he said he is in the race for the long haul. “Whatever it takes,” he said.

Jordan was spotted heading into the speaker’s office, about a half hour before the vote was expected to start.


In 16 years, not a single bill bearing Jordan’s name has become law — 11:15 a.m.

By the Associated Press

While Jordan has made a reputation as a chaos agent in his time in Congress, the Ohio Republican, unlike previous speaker candidates, has no real legislative chops.

In his 16 years in Washington, not a single bill bearing Jordan’s name has been signed into law.

Instead, he has spent his time in Congress fighting to get retribution for his political allies, to kill legislation and eventually to maneuver his way to becoming the top Republican on some of the chamber’s most powerful committees.

His lack of legislative experience has been a criticism that moderates and Democrats have deployed against him in recent days. But his office has pushed back, saying he has been instrumental in getting legislation through the committees he serves on without putting his name on it.


Jordan clinches support of Biden-district Republican — 11:00 a.m.

By the Associated Press

Hours before a floor vote, one of former House Speaker Kevin McCarthy’s most loyal supporters threw his support behind Jordan after days of hesitation.

Rep. Juan Ciscomani, R-Ariz., a first-term member, said that after having several conversations with Jordan, he’s decided to vote for him on the floor.

“There’s too much at stake to continue to be stalled,” he posted on X, the website formerly known as Twitter. “I came to D.C. to work—not sit around.”

Ciscomani was one of at least a dozen Republicans who had yet to throw their support behind Jordan. He represents a district won by Democrat Joe Biden in the 2020 election.


Will this speaker election go 15 rounds? — 10:40 a.m.

By the Associated Press

It’s uncertain how many rounds it might take for Jordan to clinch the gavel, but his supporters are confident that the public floor vote will force the remaining holdouts to flip their way. McCarthy narrowly won the speakership in January on the 15th round of balloting, after five excruciating days.

It is unlikely to take Jordan nearly as long to triumph. House Republicans are exhausted by weeks of infighting over who will lead the conference and frustrated by the inability of the chamber to pass legislation, particularly in response to the Israel-Hamas war.


After Monday night meeting, Jordan says ‘we’ve got a few more people to talk to’ — 10:15 a.m.

By the Associated Press

“The American people deserve to have their Congress and House of Representatives working, and you can’t have that happen until you get a speaker,” Jordan said after a late-night meeting Monday at the Capitol.

As the private meeting turned into a venting session of angry Republicans, he acknowledged: “We’ve got a few more people to talk to, listen to.”

Representative Jim Jordan spoke briefly to reporters as he departed a House Republican Caucus at the Capitol on Monday. Drew Angerer/Getty

Who is supporting Jordan? — 9:45 a.m.

By the Associated Press

Jordan, a darling of the party’s hardline right-wing base, still faces opposition from some members of the conference who doubt his ability to lead.

“Being speaker of the House is not being the chairman,” Representative Mario Diaz Balart, one of the holdouts, said Friday. “Because you deal with foreign policy, you deal with the heads of state, you deal with domestic policy and you deal with security issues.”

He added, “I think there are a lot of questions about whether he can unify and lead the conference, and whether he can even lead his own people, his closest people.”

Some Republicans are upset with how the speaker’s race has played out.

Rep. Steve Scalise, the majority leader, first won his colleagues’ nomination for speaker on Wednesday. Jordan, who came in second, threw his support behind Scalise, stating that he would support his nomination when it came to the floor and urging the rest of the conference to do the same. But more than a dozen Republicans refused to back Scalise, leading him to withdraw a day later.


Here’s how today’s vote will work — 9:00 a.m.

By the Associated Press

The House is expected to gavel into session Tuesday at noon to hold what could be the first of several votes to elect a speaker. It’s a speaker’s election unlike any other following the removal of Representative Kevin McCarthy, who was suddenly and unexpectedly ousted from the post after just nine months on the job.

Once the House is in a quorum — meaning a minimum number of members are present to proceed — each party will put a name into nomination for speaker. Republicans will nominate Jordan, and it’s possible another GOP candidate will come up in protest.

Democrats will nominate Jeffries and are expected to vote for him in unison.


 

October 13, 2023

 

Scott says he’ll support Jordan — 4:56 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Scott, who challenged Jordan for the GOP nomination, says he’ll support Jordan for speaker and encouraged other Republicans to back him.

In a statement on X, Scott said Jordan is “an asset to the Republican Party and our nominee for Speaker.”


House Republicans say they plan to break for the weekend — 4:47 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

House Republicans reportedly plan to go home for the weekend and return next week to try to elect a House speaker.

They’re eyeing a Tuesday vote.


Here’s how many votes Jordan won, and how many he still needs to be speaker — 4:36 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

In a secret ballot vote, Jordan reportedly won 124 votes from his Republican colleagues, according to reporters on Capitol Hill.

In a second secret ballot, Jordan got 152 votes, while 55 Republicans declined to support him. If all lawmakers are present during a vote on the House floor, Jordan would need 217 votes to secure the position.

McCarthy told CNN’s Manu Raju he was confident Jordan could get there, and suggested lawmakers would break for the weekend and reconvene next week.

“I see where we’re at, I see where the conference is,” McCarthy told Raju, adding Scalise had fewer votes, putting Jordan in a stronger position than the previous nominee.


What happens next that Jordan is the nominee — 4:20 p.m.

By the Associated Press

Jordan will now try to unite colleagues from the deeply divided House GOP majority around his bid ahead of a floor vote, which could push to next week.

Not all Republicans want to see Jordan as speaker, second in line to the presidency. Overwhelmed and exhausted, anxious GOP lawmakers worry their House majority is being frittered away to countless rounds of infighting and some don’t want to reward Jordan’s wing, which sparked the turmoil.

“If we’re going to be the majority party, we have to act like the majority party,” said Scott, who posed a last-ditch challenge to Jordan.

While the firebrand Jordan has a long list of detractors who started making their opposition known, Jordan’s supporters said voting against the Trump ally during a public vote on the House floor would be tougher since he is so popular and well known among more conservative GOP voters.


Republicans nominate Jim Jordan for House speaker — 4:12 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Republicans nominated Jim Jordan as House speaker in a closed-door vote, the second time the conference voted on a leader this week. He would still need to win a floor vote in the narrowly split chamber to secure the job.


Republicans begin voting by secret ballot on speaker nominee — 3:40 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

House Republicans are voting for the second time this week by secret ballot on a nominee for House speaker. If a candidate prevails, the next step would be a vote on the House floor, where the nominee would need to win a majority of the full chamber — 217 is every lawmaker votes.


What’s behind the hold up in electing a speaker — 3:27 p.m.

By the Associated Press

The main complication for House Republicans is their narrow 221-212 majority. Any nominee must have near full support from Republicans, and the GOP conference is often split.

Additionally, lawmakers can vote for anyone they want to on the floor. While it has been the tradition for the speaker candidate to be a member of the House, it is not required. In January, a few Republican members even called out votes for former president Donald Trump, taking votes from McCarthy.

Historically, the magical number to become speaker has been 218 out of the 435 members of the House. But many previous speakers, including McCarthy and former Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif, have ascended to the dais with fewer votes than that because some members voted present instead of calling out a name. Every lawmaker voting “present” lowers the overall tally needed to reach a majority.

There are two vacancies in the 435-seat House right now, which means it would take 217 votes to become speaker if every lawmaker voted for a nominee.


Republicans expect a nomination vote soon — 2:58 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Republicans may vote shortly on a nominee for speaker, choosing between Jordan and Scott after they address the conference. It is not clear that either candidate has the votes to win the nomination.


Liz Cheney says GOP will be ‘abandoning the Constitution’ if Jordan is speaker — 2:20 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Former representative Liz Cheney, a Wyoming Republican who was vice chair of the Jan. 6 committee, voted to impeach Donald Trump, and frequently criticized him and far-right Republicans in the wake of the Capitol insurrection, said on the social media platform X on Friday that if Jordan is elected House speaker, Republicans “will be abandoning the Constitution.”

Trump endorsed Jordan for House speaker last week.


McCarthy says he’ll support Jordan for speaker — 2:04 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

McCarthy said he intends to support Jordan for House speaker, saying he thinks Jordan is “better prepared” than Scott for the job.


What’s next? — 1:43 p.m.

By the Associated Press

Once the Republican conference nominates a speaker — again — a House floor vote would be the final step.

The speaker is normally elected every two years, in January, when the House organizes for a new session. A new election can be held if the speaker dies, resigns or is removed from office. This is the first time an election is being held after the removal of a speaker.

Once the House is in a quorum — meaning the minimum number of members are present to proceed — each party puts a name into nomination for speaker. Democrats will nominate their current leader, New York Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, and vote for him.

House members are seated during the speakership vote. It’s one of the few times that lawmakers are all seated around the chamber.

Once the roll call for speaker begins, members are called on individually and each shouts out their choice. The candidate to become speaker needs a majority of the votes from House members who are present and voting. The House will vote as many times as necessary until someone reaches that threshold.


A speaker candidate forum is underway. Here’s who’s nominating Jordan and Scott. — 1:14 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Representatives Dusty Johnson of South Dakota, Kevin Hern of Oklahoma, and Nicole Malliotakis of New York will reportedly give speeches nominating Jordan.

Oklahoma Representative Frank Lucas will nominate Scott.


How lawmakers are reacting to Scott challenging Jordan — 12:55 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff


Georgia Representative Austin Scott jumps into race to become speaker — 12:23 p.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Representative Austin Scott, of Georgia, said he has entered the race to be speaker of the House, challenging Jim Jordan for the gavel.

“We are in Washington to legislate, and I want to lead a House that functions in the best interest of the American people,” Scott said on the X social media platform.

Scott told a CNN reporter “when I woke up this morning, I had no intentions of doing this.”


Speaker candidates have to announce bids shortly — 11:50 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Candidates seeking to become speaker of the House were given until early Friday afternoon to announce whether they are jumping into the race. Lawmakers will then reconvene at 1 p.m. for a speaker candidate forum.


Who is Jim Jordan? — 11:36 a.m.

By The Washington Post

Jordan, who finished a close second to Scalise for the nomination in a closed-door vote of House Republicans on Wednesday and was endorsed by Trump last week, is still in the hunt, but other candidates could emerge.

Jordan has risen in the ranks of the Republican conference since first being elected to Congress in 2006.

He previously served as chair of the House Freedom Caucus, a group of the most conservative House members. He also has been the top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee since 2020 - fighting off investigations into former president Donald Trump and launching investigations into President Biden since becoming chair of the committee this year.

Jordan and Scalise have a lot in common. But they also diverge in notable ways. Jordan has a reputation as a political flamethrower - lobbing attacks against Democrats and being unafraid to disagree with his party’s leadership.

Jordan, 59, was one of eight House members who served on Trump’s defense team during his first impeachment trial in the Senate. Before he left office, Trump awarded Jordan the Presidential Medal of Freedom - the nation’s highest civilian honor.

Jordan has had a hand in high-profile investigations of Democrats. As a leader of the House hearings on the deadly 2012 terrorist attack on U.S. diplomatic facilities in Benghazi, Libya, he questioned then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. He is now one of the leaders of the impeachment inquiry into Biden.


Some House Republicans say they support Jordan. Some don’t. — 11:14 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Multiple House Republicans have released statements backing Jordan for speaker, while others have told reporters they don’t support him as the nominee.

Representative Mike Rogers of Alabama told CNN’s Manu Raju he wouldn’t support Jordan, and Representative Carlos Gimenez of Florida says he remains “only Kevin.”


Jordan says he’s running for speaker, feels ‘real good’ about having the votes — 10:51 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

Jordan told reporters Friday morning that he’s running for speaker, and feels “real good about us having the votes.”

Here’s what he said:


Some Republicans urge temporary speaker to interpret powers more broadly — 10:35 a.m.

By the Associated Press

Some Republicans are urging McHenry to interpret his powers more broadly, if that’s what it takes to get the House working again, even if it means setting a new precedent that could ripple down through congressional history.

Read more.


Attention now turns to Jim Jordan — 10:16 a.m.

By the Associated Press

Attention now focuses on Jordan and his backers instantly revived calls for party members to get behind the Ohio Republican, who is a founding leader of the hard-right House Freedom Caucus.

“Make him the speaker. Do it tonight,” said Rep. Jim Banks, R-Ind. “He’s the only one who can unite our party.”

But the firebrand Jordan has a long list of detractors who started making their opposition known. Other potential speaker choices were also being floated.


House convenes, then recesses for Republicans to meet — 10:05 a.m.

By Amanda Kaufman, Globe Staff

The House went into recess on Friday morning, a day after Scalise withdrew his candidacy for speaker after he couldn’t secure enough votes.

House Speaker Pro Tempore Patrick McHenry gaveled out the House after three minutes, and the GOP conference began meeting.


What Scalise said after withdrawing — 9:57 a.m.

By the Associated Press

“I just shared with my colleagues that I’m withdrawing my name as a candidate for speaker-designee,” Scalise, the House majority leader, said as he emerged from the closed-door meeting at the Capitol.

Scalise, R-La., said the Republican majority still has to come together and “open up the House again. But clearly not everybody is there.”

He had been working furiously to secure the votes after being nominated by a majority of his colleagues, but after hours of private meetings over two days and late into the evening it was clear many other Republican lawmakers were not budging from their refusal to support him.

Asked if he would throw his support behind Jordan, Scalise said, “It’s got to be people that aren’t doing it for themselves and their own personal interest.”

Scalise spoke candidly of the perspective on life he said he has gained from surviving being shot in 2017 and said he would push quickly for a resolution. “But it wasn’t going to happen. It wasn’t going to happen today. It wasn’t going to happen tomorrow. It needs to happen soon, but I’ve withdrawn my name,” he said.


Steve Scalise ends his bid to become House speaker — 9:45 a.m.

By the Associated Press

Republican Steve Scalise ended his bid to become House speaker late Thursday after hardline holdouts refused to back the party’s nominee, throwing the GOP majority into deeper chaos and leaving the chamber still unable to function.

Scalise told GOP colleagues at a closed-door evening meeting of his decision and pointedly declined to announce backing for anyone else, including his chief rival, Representative Jim Jordan, the far-right Judiciary Committee chairman backed by Donald Trump who had already told colleagues he no longer would seek the job.

House Majority Leader Steve Scalise of Louisiana talked to reporters as he announced he is ending his campaign to be the next House speaker after a Republican meeting at the Capitol in Washington on Thursday.Jose Luis Magana/Associated Press

Amanda Kaufman can be reached at amanda.kaufman@globe.com. Follow her @amandakauf1.