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Week ahead: Arts

(Frank Meuschke)

Theater

LEGACYDaniel Goldfarb's new play is a smartly layered examination of our quest for some kind of immortality, some way to project our selves and our stories into the future. Jessica Hecht, Halley Feiffer, and Justin Long deliver strong performances, but Eric Bogosian brings little of his trademark intensity to a role that would seem to call for it: Neil, a Rothian-Maileresque literary lion in his 60s who suddenly decides that he and his wife, played by Hecht, should have a baby.
Directed by Oliver Butler. Through July 12. Williamstown Theatre Festival, at Nikos Stage, Williamstown. 413-597-3400, www.wtfestival.org

OUT OF STERNOPaula Plum's production delivers on the farcical humor and the deeper resonance of Deborah Zoe Laufer's 2009 comedy. Amanda Collins excels as a young woman whose bumpy journey of self-
discovery begins when she walks out the door of the apartment she has not left for seven years. With an indelible supporting performance by Jennifer Ellis as the raucous proprietor of a beauty emporium. Through July 18. Gloucester Stage Company, Gloucester. 978-281-4433, www.gloucesterstage.com

MAN OF LA MANCHADirector Julianne Boyd makes a pretty compelling case for this 1965 warhorse, delivering a production that is bracingly dark while also sentimental enough to raise the requisite quotient of goosebumps. Featuring strong performances by Jeff McCarthy as Don Quixote and Felicia Boswell as Aldonza, with key contributions from set designer James Kronzer and lighting designer Chris Lee. Through July 11.
Barrington Stage Company. Boyd-Quinson Mainstage,
Pittsfield. 413-236-8888, www.barringtonstageco.org

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THOREAU OR, RETURN
TO WALDEN
Racial injustice is very much on the mind of Henry David Thoreau as he revisits the place that inspired "Walden.'' Thoreau is a man locked in conflict with his nation — and to a certain extent, himself — in this smart and searching new solo play, written and performed by David Adkins and directed by Eric Hill. Through July 11. Berkshire Theatre Group, at the Unicorn Theatre, Stockbridge. 413-997-4444, www.berkshiretheatregroup.org

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DON AUCOIN

A DOLL'S HOUSEFaithful on the surface, Robert Kropf's Ibsen adaptation breathes new life and psychological insight into an oft-revived classic. Every small detail in this production bespeaks a profound understanding of the play's core. Through July 11. Harbor Stage Company, Wellfleet. 508-514-1763, www.harborstage.org

SANDY MACDONALD

Dance

PAUL TAYLOR DANCE
COMPANY
The company makes its eighth consecutive summer visit to the Berkshires, offering a wide-ranging look at Taylor's masterful
choreography. Dances include the exuberant "Esplanade" and the ever-popular "Company B,"
as well as "Diggity," "Eventide,"
"Promethean Fire," and the tango-inspired "Piazzolla Caldera." July 9-12, $15-$65 ($20 per family of six or less for the matinee). Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington. 413.528-0100, www.mahaiwe.org

NEDERLANDS DANS
THEATER 2
From the caliber of the dancing, you'd never guess this spectacular troupe of stunning young performers is designed as a kind of training company. They tackle some of the most challenging repertoire with ferocious commitment and impeccable facility. The upcoming program features works by Swedish dancemaker Johan Inger, Israeli choreographers Sharon Eyal and Gai Behar, and the Spanish-British choreographic duo Sol León and Paul Lightfoot. July 8-12, $39-$69.
Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival, Becket. 413-243-0745,
www.jacobspillow.org

THE DREAM PROJECTNative Taiwanese choreographer Chun Jou Tsai and friends meld modern-dance improvisation and Chinese traditional long-sleeves dance technique to embody the calligraphy of a Buddhist poem about pursuing one's dream. Part of the Somerville Council for the Arts' "Dancing in the Streets" series. July 10, 8:30 p.m., Free.
City Hall Concourse, Somerville. 617-625-6600, www.somerville
artscouncil.org

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BOSOMA DANCE COMPANYThis spirited troupe, led by Katherine Hooper and Irada Djelassi, wraps up this summer's "Dancing in the Streets" series with a repertory program that includes the informal premiere of "Turn on, Boot up, Jack in," developed with former Giordano Dance Chicago dancer Lindsey Leduc and workshopped with David Dorfman. July 11, 8:30 p.m., Free. Foss Park, 219 Broadway, Somerville. 617-625-6600, www.somerville
artscouncil.org

KAREN CAMPBELL

Galleries

GLAZED & DIFFUSED Consider clay the canvas and glaze the paint, and you have 3-D paintings, or at least ceramics conversing with painting. This show begins with late 19th-century maverick ceramicist George Ohr and spotlights contemporary clay artists tuned into surface abstraction. Through Aug. 16.
Ferrin Contemporary, 1315 Mass MoCA Way, North Adams.
413-346-4004, www.ferrin
contemporary.com

LYNNE HARLOW: PINK "Limitless and Lonesome," a color-and-sound installation from this multi-media colorist, was inspired by a West Texas dusk. Other lyrical and spare work on view explores rhythm, horizon, and landscape with luminous Plexiglas and brass nails. Through Aug. 15. Drive-By Projects,
81 Spring St., Watertown.
617-835-8255, www.drive-byprojects.com
CATE McQUAID

Museums

NIGHT VISION: NOCTURNES IN AMERICAN ART 1860-1960A major survey of scenes of the night by American artists over the course of a century, taking in works by Albert Ryder, Edward Hopper, Ansel Adams, Georgia O'Keeffe, Lee Krasner, and Andrew Wyeth. Through Oct. 18. Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine. 207-725-3275, www.bowdoin.edu/
art-museum

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ALFRED MAURER: AT THE
VANGUARD OF MODERNISM
A retrospective of the fascinating career of the underrated American modernist. Maurer, a talented realist, converted early to
Fauvism (through his connections with the Steins in Paris), and later adopted Cubism. He was a crucial figure in the
development of American modernism. Through July 31. Addison Gallery of American Art,
Andover. 978-749-4015, www.andover.edu/Museums/
Addison

ROZ CHAST: CARTOON
MEMOIRS
The popular cartoonist associated with The New Yorker and the author of the best-selling memoir "Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant" is the subject of a career overview that is a little bit manic and extremely funny. Through Oct. 26. Norman Rockwell Museum, Stockbridge. 413-298-4100, www.nrm.org

SAMURAI! An exhibition of work by contemporary artists inspired by samurai myths and representations. Includes work by Japanese and American illustrators and painters, and a diverse array of media, including prints and paper sculpture. Inspired by the recent acquisition of the Higgins Armory collection, which includes many samurai-related objects. Through Sept. 6. Worcester Art Museum, Worcester. 508-799-4406, www.worcesterart.org

SEBASTIAN SMEE

ARCADIA: THOUGHTS ON THE CONTEMPORARY PASTORAL

How do we integrate nature into the city? How does technology mediate our experience of the outdoors? Artist Steve Locke curates this show about the increasingly complicated crossroads of nature and culture. Pictured: Frank Meuschke's "Prospect Park," July 10-Sept. 20. Mills Gallery,
Boston Center for the Arts, 551 Tremont St. 617-426-5000, www.bcaonline.org
CATE McQUAID

WOMEN IN CLOTHES

Devoted to edginess and to classical beauty, fashion photographers have a duty to shock and awe. This show features 20th-century luminaries such as Yousuf Karsh, Gordon Parks, Irving Penn, and Man Ray. Pictured: Gordon Parks's "Skin Tight Suit, Malibu, California, 1958.''
July 10-Sept. 12. Robert Klein Gallery, 38 Newbury St.
617-267-7997, www.robertkleingallery.com
CATE McQUAID

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