The Ticket: music, theater, dance, art, and more

“Flying Untied” is part of “Keith Johnson: An Extended Landscape of Life,” at Panopticon Gallery through Jan. 23.
Keith Johnson/Panopticon Gallery
“Flying Untied” is part of “Keith Johnson: An Extended Landscape of Life,” at Panopticon Gallery through Jan. 23.


Pop & rock

BIG THIEF “Masterpiece,” the first album from this Brooklyn outfit, swaddles Adrianne Lenker’s voice in taut riffs and wondrous guitar fuzz, making the unexpected left turns taken by the singsongy “Interstate” and the crashing “Vegas” even more thrilling. Jan. 6, 8 p.m. $13. Brighton Music Hall. 617-779-0140,

MARSHALL CRENSHAW Long beloved by scholars of quirky, smart pop, this troubadour is touring in support of “The EP Collection,” a commemoration of the six slabs of 10-inch vinyl he put out between 2013 and 2015 that includes “Move Out,” which veils its big hooks with just enough distortion. Jan. 6, 8 p.m. $30. Club Passim, Cambridge. 617-492-5300,



Folk & world

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LIZA ANNE Young Nashville singer-songwriter Liza Anne (born Elizabeth Anne Odachowski) promises to bring “emotional meltdowns to a city near you” via folk-rooted music that is by turns spare and lush and layered. She’ll deliver on that promise, including new songs from a forthcoming album, Friday evening. Jan. 6, 7:30 p.m. $10. Middle East Upstairs, Cambridge. 866-777-8932.

SONGWRITER TRIBUTE NIGHT: LEONARD COHEN You want it darker this year? Start with a look back at this recently departed musical giant. A strong lineup of local artists — Sam Moss, Darol Anger and Emy Phelps, Sean Trischka, Aurora Birch, Dietrich Strause, and others — will explore the music that the high priest of pathos left behind. Jan. 1, 7 p.m. $12. Club Passim, Cambridge. 617-492-7679.

DAMN TALL BUILDINGS This Boston band is typically categorized as a bluegrass outfit, but that’s not how they see themselves. Since they draw from many different roots traditions without belonging to any and “repurpose” those traditions for a modern audience, they’ve come up with their own name for what results: “guerrilla roots.” Jan. 6, 6 p.m. No cover. Sally O’Brien’s, Somerville. 617-666-3589.


Jazz & Blues


IGOR BUTMAN The virtuosic saxophonist, bandleader, club owner, and television personality has been called “Russia’s Wynton Marsalis” and is certainly that country’s best-known jazz performer. But he has a deep Boston connection as well, having attended Berklee and played during those years with everyone from Gary Burton to Pat Metheny to Rebecca Parris and more. Jan. 6, 8 and 10 p.m. $30. Scullers, 400 Soldiers Field Road, Boston. 866-777-8932,

ANDREW DOW, YURIANA SOBRINO & JUNKO FUJIWARA Mandorla Music’s latest season opens with this adventurous new trio featuring acoustic and electric bassist Dow, drummer Sobrino, and cellist Fujiwara performing original compositions and in-the-moment improvisations. Jan. 7, 8 p.m. $15. Third Life Studio, 33 Union Square, Somerville.,

BROOKS WILLIAMS A dazzling master of roots and blues finger style and bottleneck acoustic guitar, Williams is also a fine singer and songwriter, and a marvelous interpreter of the likes of Robert Johnson, Memphis Slim, and Blind Willie McTell, who, like Williams himself, hailed from Statesboro, Ga. Jan. 7, 8 p.m. Tickets: $18. Bull Run Restaurant, 215 Great Road, Shirley. 978-425-4311,



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The orchestra starts the new year with a concerto-heavy program, with soloists drawn from its own ranks. Ken-David Masur, the BSO’s talented assistant conductor, is on the podium. Jan. 5-7, Symphony Hall. 888-266-1200,


BOSTON OPERA COLLABORATIVE The innovative company presents “Mirror,” an immersive concert experience centered on two song cycles: Schumann’s “Frauenliebe und Leben” and Dominick Argento’s “From the Diary of Virginia Woolf.” The performances will be staged in different rooms throughout the Longy School’s Zabriskie House mansion. Jan. 6-8, Longy School of Music of Bard College. 617-517-5883,

MIRIAM FRIED AND JONATHAN BISS The mother-and-son duo begins a two-part series centered on Schumann and Bartok with the first violin sonatas of both composers, as well as Schumann’s “Drei Romanzen” Op. 94. Jan. 8, 1:30 p.m., Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. 617-278-5156,




THE SCOTTSBORO BOYS A return engagement for a production, directed by Paul Daigneault, that I considered one of the top 10 shows of 2016. The entire original cast, including De’Lon Grant, Maurice Emmanuel Parent, and Brandon G. Green, returns for Kander & Ebb’s musical about an infamous episode of racial injustice. Through Jan. 22. SpeakEasy Stage Company, at Roberts Studio Theatre, Calderwood Pavilion, Boston Center for the Arts. 617-933-8600,

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF Austin Pendleton, who was in the original 1964 Broadway cast of “Fiddler,’’ directs a vibrantly alive production that adds up to one of the most rewarding theatrical experiences of the year. Jeremiah Kissel gives it everything he’s got — and that’s a lot — as Tevye, a Jewish dairyman in an early 20th-century shtetl, sweating and struggling to cope with convulsive change in every corner of his life and his world. Through Jan. 1. New Repertory Theatre, Mainstage Theater, Mosesian Center for the Arts, Watertown. 617-923-8487,

DISNEY ON ICE PRESENTS DARE TO DREAM Calculating but nonetheless beguiling, this figure-skating show offers just enough of those expertly engineered moments of enchantment that are central to the Disney formula. Performers portray Disney princesses from “Tangled,’’ “The Princess and the Frog,’’ “Cinderella,’’ and “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.’’ Taylor Steele is a standout as Rapunzel, from “Tangled.’’ Through Jan. 1. Feld Entertainment, Inc. Agganis Arena at Boston University. 800-653-8000,


FINGERSMITH Nothing is as it seems in this Victorian thriller, which playwright Alexa Junge deftly adapted from Sarah Waters’s novel of the same name. A young pickpocket is sent to trick a fine lady into marrying an oily thief. The plan is to commit the lady to a psychiatric institution and steal her fortune. But identities change. Allegiances shift. Director Bill Rauch nimbly re-creates his original production from the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, moving the twisting — and twisted — tale at a rapid pace. Through Jan. 8. American Repertory Theater, Loeb Drama Center, Cambridge. 617-547-8300,



FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE The weekend after New Year’s is traditionally slow for dance. But this ongoing Everett event almost always features a little terpsichorean hijinks to enliven the improvisatory creativity. It’s followed by Open Stage, a monthly showcase for young performers featuring Everett’s house dance troupe Case Closed! Jan. 6. $5 each show. Everett Stage, Providence. 401-831-9479,

DORRANCE DANCE Though it’s still a couple of weeks away, tickets for this engagement are sure to be a hot item. MacArthur “genius” and tap superstar Michelle Dorrance and her talented hoofers are generating some of the most imaginative work in the field. The program features highlights from her award-winning repertoire, including “SOUNDspace” and “Myelination.” Jan. 13-15, $40-$65. Cutler Majestic Theatre. 617-876-4275,

DANCEWORKS BOSTON PROJECT This one’s a week away, but the massive initiative involves about 180 performers, so tickets go fast. Dancers are mostly trained nonprofessional adults looking for a performance outlet, and styles of original choreography range from ballet and contemporary to hip-hop, jazz, and tap. Jan. 12-14, $20-$30. Tsai Performance Center. 617-353-8725, KAREN CAMPBELL


KEITH JOHNSON: AN EXTENDED LANDSCAPE OF LIFE The photographer fashions his own typologies, grouping his images in grids and series to look more closely, find correspondences and stories, follow time’s passage, and echo his experience with the camera. Pictured: “Flying Untied.’’ Through Jan. 23. Panopticon Gallery, 502c Commonwealth Ave. 781-718-5777,

LATINX2@AMERICANAZA Eight Latina artists, including Magda Fernández and Daniela Rivera, tease apart power structures, including sexism, the tenacious vestiges of colonialism, and attitudes toward immigrants. Art and imagination, they suggest, may be the best means to refuel and move ahead. Through Jan. 28. Samson, 450 Harrison Ave. 617-357-7177,

APATHIE In another strategic assault on the patriarchy, this group show uses femme identity as a lens to scrutinize society, and storytelling about personal experience (trauma, growing up biracial) as a way to reach out and regroup. Through Jan. 15. Distillery Gallery, 516 East 2nd St., South Boston. (No phone),



MOUNT WASHINGTON: THE CROWN OF NEW ENGLAND The first exhibition devoted exclusively to depictions of Mount Washington. Includes prints, photographs, illustrated guidebooks, and paintings by such artists as Thomas Cole, Albert Bierstadt, John Frederick Kensett, Winslow Homer, and George Inness. Through Jan. 16. Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, N.H. 603-669-6144,

NICK CAVE: UNTIL A massive installation — the largest yet by the artist previously celebrated for his “Soundsuits” — made up of thousands of found objects and beads. The installation, in Mass MoCA’s largest gallery, will be in place for one year; it will be used as a performance space during that period. Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, North Adams. 413-662-2111,

INVENTING IMPRESSIONISM Many rarely seen works on paper have been pulled out of storage for this exhibition of works from the collection by Berthe Morisot, Paul Cezanne, Camille Pissarro, Mary Cassatt, Edgar Degas, and Edouard Manet, among others. Through June 11. RISD Museum, Providence. 401-454-6400,




100 FIRST JOKES This has become a bit of a tradition at ImprovBoston — two shows featuring 50 comedians each, every one of them getting two minutes to tell jokes they’ve never told in public, to kick off the new year. Jan. 1, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. $10. ImprovBoston, 40 Prospect St., Cambridge. 617-576-1253,

CHRIS KATTAN The former “Saturday Night Live” star and current voice of “Bunnicula,” trained as a sketch and improv performer, has been devoting himself to standup the past few years. Jan. 6-7, 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $29-$39. Laugh Boston, 425 Summer St., Boston. 617-725-2844,

MATCH.PROV Local troupe Improv Jones invites a couple of people from the audience to join them in this improvised exploration of love and dating the first Saturday of each month. Jan. 7, 10 p.m. $5-$10. The Riot Theater, 146A South St., Jamaica Plain. 617-942-0294,



SCHOOL VACATION WEEK The holidays may be over but there’s plenty to celebrate over at The Children’s Museum in Easton. Don’t worry about bringing a party hat, you can make one along with noisemakers, cards, and other exciting gizmos. Jan. 2, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. The Children’s Museum in Easton, 9 Sullivan Ave., North Easton. 508-230-3789

WINTER REIMAGINED Bundle up and explore the gardens and conservatories at Tower Hill along with glittering light displays and scavenger hunts through the trails. Rain or shine, these trees are sure to delight. Jan. 4-8, 11 a.m.- 3 p.m. Free for members, adults $12, kids $7. Tower Hill Botanic Garden, 11 French Drive, Boylston. 508-869-6111

SNOWFLAKE FESTIVAL Ring in the new year with a day full of arts and crafts and demonstrations at the Brookline Arts Center. Hot chocolate awaits! Jan 7, 1 p.m.-3:30 p.m. Free. Brookline Arts Center, 86 Monmouth St., Brookline. 617-566-5715



Jan. 12-15 Guster at Paradise Rock Club

Jan. 13 Kings of Leon and Deerhunter at TD Garden

Jan. 17-29 “Something Rotten!” at Boston Opera House

Jan. 19-Feb. 5 “Trans Scripts, Part I: The Women” at Loeb Drama Center

Jan. 28 CRASHfest (Air Congo, Bombino, Carrie Rodriguez, Daby Touré, Debo Band, Emperor Norton’s Stationary Marching Band, LADAMA, Orkesta Mendoza, Salif Keita, San Fermin and NOW Ensemble) at House of Blues

Jan. 28 Our Lady J at Loeb Drama Center

Feb. 1 LÉON and Jacob Banks at The Sinclair