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Movie Stars

New releases

Dead Man Down Colin Farrell and Noomi Rapace are two urban loners whose parallel revenge plots intertwine. A bruised, loopy, violent crime thriller that has its melodramatic charms before the story gets stupid, it’s the first Hollywood film by Niels Arden Oplev (the Swedish version of “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo”). Co­starring Terrence Howard and, surreally, Isabelle Huppert. (118 min., R) (Ty Burr)

Don’t Stop Believin’: Everyman’s Journey This overcoming-adversity documentary from director Ramona S. Diaz follows the story of Arnel Pineda, who stepped into the very large shoes of Steve Perry as lead singer of Journey. It’s an inspiring, if slightly by-the-numbers, rags-to-riches story. Who wouldn’t root for Pineda (other than maybe Perry)? (113 min., unrated) (Geoff Edgers)

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Emperor Japan has surrendered. General Douglas MacArthur (Tommy Lee Jones) tasks a deputy, General Bonner Fellers (Matthew Fox), to investigate whether Emperor Hirohito should be charged with war crimes. Doesn’t sound very promising, does it? Watching Jones be Jones — he sure isn’t MacArthur — is, as always, a kick. But, boy, even seen in flashbacks, courting a Japanese woman (Eriko Hatsune), what a hopeless stick Fox is. (104 min., PG-13) (Mark Feeney)

Night Across the Street The final work by the great Chilean surrealist Raul Ruiz joins the handfuls of films about death made by directors who knew they were dying. It’s an elegantly illogical memory play that flits from topic to topic: childhood, pulp fiction, Beethoven. In Spanish, with subtitles. (110 min., unrated) (Ty Burr)

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Oz the Great and Powerful This unofficial prequel has 3-D, the latest computer effects, and Sam Raimi behind the camera. But, alas, a lightweight James Franco is in front of the camera as a feckless young magician whisked to Oz. There are glorious moments, but the film never finds its groove. With Rachel Weisz (great), Michelle Williams (good), and Mila Kunis (sorry, no). (130 min., PG) (Ty Burr)

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