fb-pixel

OPENINGS

Sept. 27

“Abominable”

“Buñuel in the Labyrinth
of the Turtles”

“The Death of Dick Long”

“Judy”

“Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool”

“Monos”

SERIES, REVIVALS, ONE-OFFS

Coolidge Corner

THE SOUNDS OF SILENTS

“Underworld” (1927), accompanied by the Alloy Orchestra, Sept. 23, 7 p.m.

CINE ALMÓDOVAR

“All About Mother” (1999), Sept. 24, 7 p.m.

NT LIVE

“Fleabag,” Sept. 26, 7 p.m. and 9:45 p.m.

Harvard Film Archive

THE B-FILM. LOW-BUDGET HOLLYWOOD CINEMA 1935-1959

“Crime Wave” (1954)/”Plunder Road” (1957), Sept. 22, 3:30 p.m.

“The Leopard Man” (1943)/”The Ghost Ship” (1943) Sept. 23, 7 p.m.

“Murder by Contract” (1958), Sept. 28, 9 p.m.

GODFREY REGGIO, CINEMATIC SEER

Advertisement



“Naqoyqatsi” (2002), Sept. 22, 7 p.m., with Reggio at screening

AN EVENING WITH MARGARET HONDA

“Wildflowers” and “Color Correction” (both 2015), Sept. 27, 7 p.m., with Honda at screening

Somerville

JACK ATTACK

“The Evening Star” (1996), Sept. 22, 4:30 p.m.

“Mars Attacks!” (1996), Sept. 22, 7:15 p.m.

“As Good as It Gets” (1997), Sept. 26, 7:30 p.m.

SILENTS, PLEASE

“Girl Shy” (1924), accompanied by Jeff Rapsis, Sept. 22, 2 p.m.

Fenway, Assembly Row

“The Shawshank Redemption” (1994), Sept. 22, 24, 25

Mount Auburn Cemetery,

“Wings of Desire” (1987)/“The Royal Tenenbaums” (2001), Sept. 26, 7 p.m.

FESTIVAL JUNCTION

Boston Film Festival, through Sept. 22, at ICON Seaport,

www.bostonfilmfestival.org

Boston Latin International Film Festival, Sept. 25-29, at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Public Library, Emerson Paramount Center, Harvard, Northeastern, www.bliff.org

Boston Women’s Film Festival, Sept. 26-29, at Brattle and MFA, www.bostonwomensfest.org

STREAMING

“Late Night”

Available on Amazon

“Yesterday”

Available on Amazon, Apple, Google Play, Vudu

A YEAR AGO PEOPLE WERE LOOKING FORWARD TO . . .

★ ★ ★ ½ A Star Is Born The latest version of the unkillable showbiz saga (filmed before in 1937, 1954, and 1976) has heart, soul, and sinew. Above all, it has Lady Gaga in the lead and a grizzled Bradley Cooper opposite her and behind the camera. The midsection is baggy, but the opening hour is as good as mainstream moviemaking gets in the 21st century. Gaga, Cooper, and the picture all earned Oscar nominations. She and three co-writers won for best song, “Shallow.” (135 min., R) (Ty Burr)

Advertisement



Available on Amazon Prime, HBO, Vudu, YouTube

HAPPY BIRTHDAY . . .

Pedro Almodóvar (Sept. 25, 1949)

What’s the Spanish for “enfant terrible”? Almodóvar has always been so energetic, buoyant, playful, irreverent. His spirit animal must be an electric eel, he loves to shock so much. Come to think of it, a creature that lives in the water nicely chimes with that, um, bathtub-toy scene in “Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!” (1989). It’s hard to believe Almodóvar’s turning 70. It’s almost as unthinkable as if his early-days cast regulars Rossy de Palma were to go the rhinoplasty route or Carmen Maura, she of those bottomless dark eyes, started wearing blue contacts. The Coolidge, in conjunction with El Planeta, is celebrating the birthday with its Cine Almodóvar series, through Oct. 1.

Above and beyond Almodóvar’s talent and ebullience — above and beyond the films themselves, and the latest, “Pain and Glory,” arrives next month — there’s something else notable about the career. Almodóvar’s emergence in the late ’70s and ’80s marked Spain’s return not just to contemporary film but also contemporary European culture. A society that had spent nearly four decades under the deadening grip of Francisco Franco finally burst back on the scene. Almodóvar didn’t light the fuse, but he sure had fun throwing some of the most outrageous munitions. So did audiences, who got to witness the explosions.

Advertisement



MARK FEENEY


Mark Feeney can be reached at mfeeney@globe.com.