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Snack makers moonlight as teachers of dieticians

HOUSTON — Snack and soda makers, often blamed for fueling the nation’s obesity rates, also play a role in educating the dietitians who advise Americans on healthy eating.

Frito-Lay, Kellogg, Coca-Cola, and others are essentially teaching the teachers. Their workshops and online classes for the nation’s dietitians are part of a behind-the-scenes effort to burnish the images of their snacks and drinks.

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The practice has raised concerns among some who say it gives the food industry too much influence over dietitians who take the classes to earn the credits they need to maintain their licenses.

‘‘It’s not education. It’s PR,’’ said Andy Bellatti, a Las Vegas-based dietitian who helped found Dietitians for Professional Integrity, a group of about a dozen dietitians who are calling for an end to the practice.

With two-thirds of Americans considered overweight or obese, the makers of processed foods have shouldered much of the blame for aggressively marketing sugary and salty products. Critics say companies use the classes, which are usually free and more convenient than other courses dietitians can take, as a way to cast their products in a positive nutritional light. Also, companies often collect the contact information of dietitians to mail them samples or coupons, in some cases to distribute to their patients.

Food and beverage companies, meanwhile, say their classes are intended to inject perspective into the public debate over nutrition.

At the annual Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo, the industry offered several workshops on nutrition for the thousands of dietitians who show up there each year.

In Houston last fall, Frito-Lay explained to dietitians how it removed trans fats from its Lay’s potato chips and other snacks. The makers of high fructose corn syrup encouraged them to question a study that ties the prevalence of the sweetener to higher rates of Type 2 diabetes. And the company famous for its Frosted Flakes cereal taught about the benefits of fiber.

‘‘Has anyone tried our new chickpea burgers?’’ asked an employee of Kellogg, which also makes Special K and Morningstar veggie burgers.

The matter of corporate influence isn’t limited to dietitians. In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration issued guidance intended to address concerns regarding the role of drug makers in continuing medical education for doctors. The guidance drew distinctions between ads and education, essentially stating that drug companies shouldn’t influence the latter.

Those barriers don’t exist between food companies and dietitians. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, a professional group that’s based in Chicago and has more than 75,000 members, governs the path to becoming a registered dietitian and oversees the accreditation for continuing education providers.

Glenna McCollum, president of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, said dietitians are trained to question any findings that might not seem sound.

For registered dietitians, continuing education is a requirement. After earning a bachelor’s degree in nutrition, completing an internship program, and taking an exam, they must earn 75 credits of continuing education every five years. An hour class typically translates to one credit.

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