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The names of the first owners of the condos in the Millennium Tower are public, and there's barely an Old Boston name among them.

Deeds for the first 47 units to officially close at the ultra-luxury tower in Downtown Crossing were filed with Suffolk County Thursday morning, with prices ranging from $875,000 for a unit on the 16th floor to $8.7 million for one on 45.

And unlike the other high-profile luxury condo building to open recently, 22 Liberty in the Seaport District, most of the names wouldn't ring a bell with the average Bostonian.

It appears that three members of the Agganis family — relatives of the Lynn native, former Red Sox player, and Boston University arena namesake Harry Agganis — bought three units on the tenth floor. One of the Agganises did not return a message seeking comment.

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Several other units were bought by local executives.

But most names in the deeds so far, which account for about 10 percent of sales in the 442-unit tower, have a low profile.

By contrast, the buyers of condos at 22 Liberty include Patriots owner Bob Kraft, technology entrepreneur Paul English, and Vertex Pharmaceuticals founder Josh Boger. Others included well-heeled suburbanites trading empty nests for a pad in the city.

Richard Baumert, who's leading the Downtown Crossing project for developer Millennium Partners, said many of his buyers were also trading homes in the suburbs, while some are moving from other condos downtown. About 75 percent of the new owners, Baumert said, are from the Boston area, while the remaining, from out-of-town and overseas, reflects Boston's emergence as an international city.

"One of the interesting things that has happened in Boston in the last 10 or 15 years is that change," he said. "This is a very eclectic and international city today."

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The Globe reported in June that the Millennium's most expensive unit, a 13,000-square-foot penthouse that was listed at $37.5 million, was purchased by John Grayken, a South Shore native who has made a fortune running a hedge fund and has homes in England and Geneva and on a small island in Cohasset Harbor.

Debra Taylor Blair, president of LINK, a real estate data firm that tracks luxury housing sales, said Boston has become a draw for overseas investors looking for a secure places to park money and a pleasant place to live. With more luxury condo buildings underway in Boston, Taylor Blair expects Boston will see even more global cash coming here.

"Boston is still relatively undervalued compared to other international real estate markets," she said. "But it's increasingly on the map as an international city with ultraluxury housing. What's new for us is we have a critical mass of units."

Some Millennium units registered Thursday were bought in the name of businesses or shell companies that hide the buyer's identity — not an unusual move in high-end real estate. A few of those companies bought several units on different floors.

For example, 11 units on the building's lower floors were purchase by two companies with the same address in Concord, for a total of $10.6 million. Attempts Thursday to reach the person listed in state records as the companies' general partner were not successful.

Baumert said he did not know details but added that Millennium has tried to limit purchases by people who would not live there themselves, but rent them out instead. All but about 20 of the tower's 442 units have sold, he said.

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This week, workers were finishing the lower half of the tower. The first two residents are scheduled to move in Friday, with more following over the coming weeks. Units on the top floors will be ready for move-in later this year.


Tim Logan can be reached at tim.logan@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter at @bytimlogan.